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The Crime Cafe https://www.debbimack.com Interviews and entertainment for crime fiction, suspense and thriller fans. Wed, 19 Jan 2022 19:19:30 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.3 yes The Crime Cafe has interviews with authors who write crime fiction, true crime, suspense and thrillers, as well as author readings and old radio episodes. This podcast is released every other Sunday for nine months a year. Patreon supporters get year-round access to bonus episodes and other perks. Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi Mack clean Debbi Mack mackthewriter5@gmail.com mackthewriter5@gmail.com (Debbi Mack) © 2015 - 2021 Debbi Mack Interviews and entertainment for crime fiction, suspense and thriller fans. TV-PG Biweekly Support the podcast! Support the podcast! S. 7, Ep. 15: Interview with Crime Writer Ellery Kane https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/s-7-ep-15-interview-with-crime-writer-ellery-kane/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-7-ep-15-interview-with-crime-writer-ellery-kane Sun, 16 Jan 2022 05:05:52 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22553 This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer Ellery Kane. Check out our interview to learn more about her work in forensic psychology and her fiction. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here's a PDF transcript of the interview! Debbi: Hi everyone. Before I introduce our first guest of 2022, I just want to say thank you to Lanny Larcinese—I hope I pronounced that right—for becoming our first new patron of the new year. Thank you so much. And our first guest for 2022 is a forensic psychologist by day and novelist by night. She was one of 10 semi-finalists in the James Patterson co-author competition. A Texan at heart, she now lives in the beautiful San Francisco Bay area. It's my pleasure to introduce my guest Ellery Kane. Hi Ellery. Thanks for being here today. Ellery: Hi. Thanks so much for having me. I'm looking forward to our chat. Debbi: Me too. Yeah, I've been. I will say this. We have something in common. We've both been to prisons to visit inmates for interviews for different reasons. Ellery: Okay. Debbi: I was an attorney at one time and had to go visit somebody in a prison. Ellery: Oh, were you? I had no idea you were an attorney, so you know a little bit about how prisons are a whole...another world Debbi: They sure are. Yeah, and kind of scary when you first walk into them. Ellery: Absolutely. Can be a real culture shock for somebody that's never been in a prison before. Debbi: Absolutely. For someone who doesn't know, what is your role as a forensic psychologist? What is it that you do? Ellery: A forensic psychologist is a psychologist that has anything to do with the law, so it's really about the intersection of psychology and the law, and forensic psychologists do a lot of different things. Usually in the popular media, you think of people like Alex Cross or Clarice Starling, but forensic psychologists do a lot of different things. They can be involved in things like child custody cases or in determination of disability. What I do specifically is violence risk assessment, so I work for the Board of Parole Hearings in California, and I assess long-term inmates who have been in prison for many years, most of them for very serious crimes like murder or other violent offenses, and they're coming up for their parole hearing. My job is to assess their risk for violence to help the parole board make a decision... This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer Ellery Kane.

Check out our interview to learn more about her work in forensic psychology and her fiction.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

Here’s a PDF transcript of the interview!

Debbi: Hi everyone. Before I introduce our first guest of 2022, I just want to say thank you to Lanny Larcinese—I hope I pronounced that right—for becoming our first new patron of the new year. Thank you so much. And our first guest for 2022 is a forensic psychologist by day and novelist by night. She was one of 10 semi-finalists in the James Patterson co-author competition. A Texan at heart, she now lives in the beautiful San Francisco Bay area. It’s my pleasure to introduce my guest Ellery Kane. Hi Ellery. Thanks for being here today.

Ellery: Hi. Thanks so much for having me. I’m looking forward to our chat.

Debbi: Me too. Yeah, I’ve been. I will say this. We have something in common. We’ve both been to prisons to visit inmates for interviews for different reasons.

Ellery: Okay.

Debbi: I was an attorney at one time and had to go visit somebody in a prison.

Ellery: Oh, were you? I had no idea you were an attorney, so you know a little bit about how prisons are a whole…another world

Debbi: They sure are. Yeah, and kind of scary when you first walk into them.

Ellery: Absolutely. Can be a real culture shock for somebody that’s never been in a prison before.

Debbi: Absolutely. For someone who doesn’t know, what is your role as a forensic psychologist? What is it that you do?

Ellery: A forensic psychologist is a psychologist that has anything to do with the law, so it’s really about the intersection of psychology and the law, and forensic psychologists do a lot of different things. Usually in the popular media, you think of people like Alex Cross or Clarice Starling, but forensic psychologists do a lot of different things. They can be involved in things like child custody cases or in determination of disability. What I do specifically is violence risk assessment, so I work for the Board of Parole Hearings in California, and I assess long-term inmates who have been in prison for many years, most of them for very serious crimes like murder or other violent offenses, and they’re coming up for their parole hearing. My job is to assess their risk for violence to help the parole board make a decision about their release.

Debbi: As a forensic psychologist, how do you feel about the prison system and how well they’re doing in terms of …?

Ellery: Well, that could be a whole dissertation. I think that the area that I most focus on in terms of what’s relevant for psychologists is rehabilitation, and there are a lot of great treatment programs in prison. Unfortunately, not all the prisons have access to the same kinds of treatment, so that means that not all the inmates will have access to the same kinds of treatment, and it can be a real issue for inmates that have specific problems like sex offenders. There’s not a lot of great programming for them, so they do a good job in some areas, but other areas there certainly still needs to be some growth and some attention because one of the main goals of incarceration is rehabilitation. It’s not just about punishment. And that’s one of the things that I’m looking for is to see that somebody has changed and that can be really hard to do if you don’t have access to treatment.

Debbi: Yes, exactly. Before we talk about your forensic pathology books, I’d like to ask you about some of your other work, your previous work. I saw this whole back list that you have. The Legacy series—that’s a trilogy and a prequel, right?

Ellery: Yes.

Debbi: Tell us a little about that.

Ellery: The Legacy series is actually the first set of books that I wrote when I first got back into writing. For as long as I can remember, I’ve always been a writer and I do a lot of writing for my day job as well. I grew up writing short stories and I always thought in my mind, someday I’m going to write a novel, but it sort of got pushed to the wayside with all of my day job duties and the amount of writing that I have to do for that, which is quite extensive. So finally in 2014 I decided this is the time. I’m not going to put it off any longer. I’m just start writing. And I actually signed up for a writing course that I ended up never taking, because I just started writing Legacy, which was the first book, and it just flowed, unlike any book has flowed since then, I’ll be honest. That was the easiest one to write, and I wrote it in about six weeks and that series just came pretty easily and quickly. So those books were published in 2014, 2015, 2016, around that timeframe.

It’s a young adult series, set in a dystopian world and it also involve psychology and forensic psychology in a way, because the main issue is that society has really become addicted to emotion-altering medications and they have had a big consequence on the world. The series is set at that time. It’s set in 2041 and I think it involves a lot of my day job as well. So, all of my books have been inspired by my day job. I completed that series and then actually decided to take a turn towards thrillers, and that’s my other series that I have ongoing, which is the Doctors of Darkness series.

Debbi: Right. Yeah. So I think that’s fascinating. I love that in the Legacy series, you have this female, basically action protagonist, kind of like an adventure protagonist in the dystopian world. Did you have to spend a lot of time? I mean you draw on your background, but it seems like there’s some world building you’d have to do as well. Is that something that you really worked on?

Ellery: Yeah, absolutely. I think that was one of the big … I think that’s always a challenge when you’re writing a dystopian novel is really setting up the world and building the world. I wrote the first book and honestly, I intended it just to be that, just to be a single standalone book. But I was working with an editor at the time and she said, I think you should keep going, and so I ended up continuing on. And as I continued writing the second book and the third book, and then the prequel, I built the world even more than I had ever intended and it became a much bigger story and almost a saga that I never really pictured from the beginning, but I’m so that I did continue on, because I think it’s great to have those. That second and third book really round out the main character and you get to know all the characters so much better.

Debbi: That’s fantastic. It’s almost as if you started out with that world built in your head but not on the page necessarily, but it came to you as you wrote the series.

Ellery: Yes, and it drew a lot on my psychology background because I was talking about emotion-altering medications, and I made up some different medications in the books. Things that you would take to help you experience no anxiety whatsoever, or to just experience extreme happiness. And in a way, these aren’t so different than the actual medications that we have available, that psychiatrists prescribed. So, I was kind of drawing on that idea of the way that we oftentimes I see in society today. We are seeking kind of a quick fix. We don’t really want to address what’s underlying our problems and our emotions, but we just want to fix them and cover over them. So that’s a lot of what the books are about. It’s about carrying that idea to the extreme and what would happen if we really could just take a pill and our anxiety would just disappear, or we could just feel happy.

I made up some different medications in the books. Things that you would take to help you experience no anxiety whatsoever, or to just experience extreme happiness. And in a way, these aren’t so different than the actual medications that we have available, that psychiatrists prescribed.

Debbi: Wow. I really hear everything you’re saying. That’s fantastic. I also love that the covers of those books have pictures of the Golden Gate Bridge on them. That’s like a continuing theme. I take it, is San Francisco like another character in your books?

Ellery: It is, yes. And especially in that series. All of those books are set in San Francisco at some of the landmarks that you really think of when you think of San Francisco. So, the Golden Gate Bridge figures quite prominently. Alcatraz is sort of the setting for the villain in the book, and so all the things that you think of when you think about San Francisco are in that Legacy series in different ways and in a dystopian time. So, I agreed to that aspect of it too.

Debbi: Very cool. Let’s see. Now you have the Rockwell and Decker series. Tell us about how you came up with these characters and the idea for that series.

Ellery: The Rockwell and Decker series is a series that I wrote for Bookouture, and this series kind of came about jointly between myself and my editor there. She had contacted me and asked me if I was interested in working with them and writing a series, and of course, I jumped on the chance. Bookouture is really well known for their great marketing and great sales, so I was really excited to work with them. She had in mind a detective and a forensic psychologist working as a team and to me, that was right at my alley, so I created these characters. Olivia Rockwell is the forensic psychologist and Will Decker is the detective, and there’s a little bit of a romance, a budding romance between the two of them, and they tackle some pretty big cases in those first three books and their relationship continues to build. We also meet Will’s partner, who’s one of my favorite characters of the series JB. He’s kind of like that typical grizzled, jaded detective who partners up with Will and is always there to kind of give Will a hard time and sort of jab him every now and again.

Olivia Rockwell is the forensic psychologist and Will Decker is the detective, and there’s a little bit of a romance, a budding romance between the two of them, and they tackle some pretty big cases in those first three books and their relationship continues to build.

Debbi: Yeah. That’s always kind of a nice combination when you have that sort of people playing off each other like that. It’s usually kind of cool.

Ellery: It’s nice, because it also gives me a chance to write some humor into the books. And I think that’s really important when you’re writing about murder.

Debbi: Especially serial killers.

Ellery: Exactly! Even in my day job when I’m dealing with murder and all these serious things on a daily basis, it’s important to inject a little humor. So really all my books, I try to have characters that are sort of foils and have a little bit of humor in there.

Debbi: I love it. To go back for a second to the Doctors of Darkness, that’s a series also, isn’t it? Are they connected in some way, but they’re not about the same protagonist, correct?

Ellery: They are. They’re connected in the sense that they’re all about psychologists who find themselves in dark situations. They all have pasts that they’re bringing to the job and some of those pasts start to rear their ugly heads. Each of the books features a psychologist, which is why it’s called the Doctors of Darkness. The first book Daddy Darkest is actually the book that I was inspired to write for the James Patterson competition that you mentioned earlier, and that was really when my writing of thrillers kind of took off. I always knew that I wanted to write thrillers because those are so in line with what I do day to day, and so I came up with the idea of two friends on a trip to San Francisco and they get off the plane. One of them goes to the restroom and never returns. That was sort of the premise for the beginning of the book, and from there it takes off and we have both a daughter protagonist and a mom protagonist who is the forensic psychologist. And we sort of get to know about the mom’s past and how that influences what’s going on in the daughter’s kind of harrowing present.

I always knew that I wanted to write thrillers because those are so in line with what I do day to day, and so I came up with the idea of two friends on a trip to San Francisco and they get off the plane. One of them goes to the restroom and never returns.

Debbi: Hmm. Interesting. What are you working on now?

Ellery: So now I’ve kind of taken a bit of a hiatus from the Rockwell and Decker series, and I’m still working with Bookouture. I’m working on a standalone thriller. The title is still under wraps so I don’t want to say it, but it’s really honestly a book that I have had so much fun writing because something that is inspired by a real-life situation that’s kind of close to my heart, which is that my elderly father had some people that came into his life that sort of took advantage of him financially. I always knew that this was a topic that I wanted to write about and I wanted to incorporate some way into my books because I think writing is so therapeutic and it helps you to just get out your emotions and play out scenarios that could never happen in real life. But it enabled me to get a little revenge through the written word so it was really fun to write.

Debbi: I understand. Yeah. but really, there is a lot of emotion that comes out in writing this stuff when you write about what you know.

Ellery: Yeah, for sure.

Debbi: Let’s see, what books do you like to read?

Ellery: Gosh, I tend to read sort of polar opposites, so I will read thrillers and then I will read a little bit of contemporary romance as well, so I kind of go back and forth. I think it’s important to not just read the same type of thing, but to have a little bit of variety. It’s similar to how I approach my day job, which is very heavy and dark a lot of times, and so I’ll spend a lot of time watching more humor or romance on TV, just to sort of break up the darkness in my mind. I don’t want to get stuck in that dark place. I did read a great thriller recently that I have loved, and it’s not too often that I will push a book onto people and say you have to read this book. The book is called The Push by Ashley Audrain and I have been telling everyone about this book because I think it’s fantastic. It’s a thriller and it’s not just a thriller. It’s a lot about motherhood. and I don’t have any children, but I think all mothers will relate to this book, and the writing is just beautiful so I highly recommend it.

I think it’s important to not just read the same type of thing, but to have a little bit of variety.

Debbi: Wow. That’s quite a recommendation. I’ve written it down. Are there any authors in particular that you find most inspiring?

Ellery: That’s a tough question. I think I’ve gleaned inspiration from just all over. Some of my favorite authors growing up that really influenced me – James Patterson comes to mind. I love the way he writes his short chapters, and I try to do that as well in my writing. That’s one of the things I kind of stole from him. To me, the short chapters, it just keeps you going. You can just easily say, oh, just one more, just one more and by the time you finished the whole book, so I love that. I also have always loved Joyce Carol Oates. She’s more of a literary writer, but I remember reading her short stories in high school, and just her use of language and the way she leaves you with kind of these just creepy sort of imagery and feelings. I love that.

Debbi: Yeah. Let’s see. What do you wish people understood better about prisons or forensic pathology?

Ellery: Oh, gosh. Well, I think probably the biggest misconception about my job and about what I do and it’s a question that I get asked a lot is why would we ever want to let a murderer out of prison? Aren’t murderers just going to go out and they’re going to kill someone again? And I think that’s probably the biggest misconception about what I do. Murder in and of itself is a very low recidivism crime, which means that most people that commit a murder never commit another murder, and the inmates that I evaluate, many of them are older so they’re in their fifties, sixties. They have had a long time in prison to reflect on their lives, reflect on what they’ve done in the past. Many of them have done extensive amounts of treatment, and they’ve made a lot of changes in their life. And we know that long term offenders who get released from prison have a very low recidivism rate. So, the inmates that I evaluate in California, their recidivism rate is like 1%, and of that 1%, very few of them commit violence. You can count on one hand how many life term inmates have been paroled and gone on to commit violence. So, I think that’s probably the biggest misconception is that people can change and murderers especially are not very likely to go on to reoffend, so these are really the individuals that we should be letting out of prison, which is surprising to most people.

Murder in and of itself is a very low recidivism crime, which means that most people that commit a murder never commit another murder, and the inmates that I evaluate, many of them are older so they’re in their fifties, sixties. They have had a long time in prison to reflect on their lives, reflect on what they’ve done in the past.

Debbi: Yeah. I think most people would find it surprising, but in a way, I don’t find it that surprising because a lot of times murder is sort of a one-off thing, right?

Ellery: Yeah. It’s a really extreme type of event. I think a lot of people though in their minds equate that extreme event with something that is more likely to reoccur, which simply isn’t the case.

Debbi: Interesting. How do you maintain a writing routine and a full-time job? I’ve always found that really, really a challenge. When do you write?

Ellery: I think in the past, before I worked with Bookouture, I was just accountable to myself so I was independently publishing my own books and I could make whatever schedule I wanted to. So, if I didn’t feel like writing one day or I felt really tired, I would just not write that day. But since I’ve been working with Bookouture, I found that I have a deadline now and so it’s important for me to stay really focused. So, I write at least 500 words a day, every day with the exception of days that I have really heavy workload, then I will just try to write something and I keep track of my writing with a little writing app that I use that helps me to set a goal for myself. I’m going to write 80,000 words for this novel at 500 words a day and how long is that going to take me, so that I can make sure to meet my deadlines. And then in terms of when I write, I just kind of fit it in whenever I can. It’s usually at the end of the day, when my brain is tired but I think that’s one of the biggest things that I’ve learned about writing and in terms of like writing advice that I would offer to people is that if you want to really be a professional writer and you want to produce novels, you can’t wait for inspiration to strike. You just have to simply put your butt in the chair every day. Writing is a lot about discipline, which I don’t think I realized when I was back in high school growing up and dreaming of being an author. I never realized how much discipline it required, but it really does. If you want to complete a novel, you have to sit down every day, whether you feel inspired or you don’t, and you just have to write.

I found that I have a deadline now and so it’s important for me to stay really focused. So, I write at least 500 words a day, every day with the exception of days that I have really heavy workload, then I will just try to write something …

Debbi: Amen to that. It’s God’s honest truth, folks.

Ellery: Easier said than done.

Debbi: Easier said than done too. Where can people find you online?

Ellery: I have a website, ellerykane.com , and all my links for various social media are on there. I’m on Twitter @ElleryKane, and Facebook as well. You can find the links on my website. It’s probably the best place to go. And again, that’s ellerykane.com.

Debbi: Cool. Does anybody ever joke about Ellery Queen with you? Like maybe there’s some connection?

Ellery: Well, there actually is a connection in that Ellery Queen is where I stole my name. It’s a pseudonym and Ellery does come from the Ellery Queen mystery magazine, and then the Kane part of the name comes from Erica Kane who was a mainstay on All My Children, and I just thought they sounded great together. So it sounds like you had it figured out.

Debbi: Oh my God. That’s great. That’s fantastic. My husband used to be addicted to that show. He was a firefighter. He’s retired now. Firefighters watch soap operas. Really, they do. He got me into it. I’d never watched it before that. That’s funny. Is there anything else you’d like to add before we finish up?

Ellery: Anything else in terms of writing advice, I think I would say the discipline portion is always really important. And then one thing that I’ve learned from my job as a forensic psychologist is that you really have to, as a writer, constantly be observing and taking in your environment. And I think that being a psychologist, it’s been such a blessing for my writing because every day I interact with different kinds of people and I’m constantly listening for how they speak for dialogue, watching how people interact for my action scenes. I’s really been a blessing to have that experience for my day job. But I think for anybody, just the power of observation is one of the best tools that we have as a writer. So, I would say observe and, and be disciplined would be my two points of advice.

Anything else in terms of writing advice, I think I would say the discipline portion is always really important. And then one thing that I’ve learned from my job as a forensic psychologist is that you really have to, as a writer, constantly be observing and taking in your environment.

Debbi: Yeah. I agree with you there. You’d probably be really good at screenwriting too as a psychologist. The psychology plays a huge part in that.

Ellery: I would love to try that. Yeah, I would love to try that. I did kind of toy with the idea for the first book Daddy Darkest, writing a screenplay, but as I was looking into it, I realized, gosh, this is a whole other type of writing and thinking about doing that, plus continuing my novels plus continuing my day job. I’m sure that I’ll attempt it eventually when things slow down a little bit.

Debbi: I know the feeling and strangely enough, I started screenwriting almost 10 years ago. I think it’s been 10 or 11 years actually.

Ellery: Oh, wow.

Debbi: It’s absolutely crazy to do it, but it is fun. I mean, I know other people do it too, so it’s like, okay, I’m not the only one.

Ellery: Right.

Debbi: So, if you ever want to, just feel free to give me a shout and I’ll lead you to some resources, if you’re interested.

Ellery: I sure will. Yeah, I will do that.

Debbi: Cool. Well, I want to thank you for being here today. Thank you so much.

Ellery: Thanks for having me.

Debbi: It was my pleasure, believe me. For everyone out there who’s listening, remember the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale through all major retailers—the 9-book box set and the short story anthology, as well as I have my own Erica Jensen and Sam McRae mystery series books up, too, at all retailers, and with a big thank you to all my patrons, including Lanny Larcinese. Here’s to a great 2022. Our next guest will be Jennifer Dornbush. Until then, take care and happy reading.

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This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer Ellery Kane. - Check out our interview to learn more about her work in forensic psychology and her fiction. - This is the Crime Cafe, This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer Ellery Kane.<br /> <br /> Check out our interview to learn more about her work in forensic psychology and her fiction.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here's a PDF transcript of the interview!<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. Before I introduce our first guest of 2022, I just want to say thank you to Lanny Larcinese—I hope I pronounced that right—for becoming our first new patron of the new year. Thank you so much. And our first guest for 2022 is a forensic psychologist by day and novelist by night. She was one of 10 semi-finalists in the James Patterson co-author competition. A Texan at heart, she now lives in the beautiful San Francisco Bay area. It's my pleasure to introduce my guest Ellery Kane. Hi Ellery. Thanks for being here today.<br /> <br /> Ellery: Hi. Thanks so much for having me. I'm looking forward to our chat.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Me too. Yeah, I've been. I will say this. We have something in common. We've both been to prisons to visit inmates for interviews for different reasons.<br /> <br /> Ellery: Okay.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I was an attorney at one time and had to go visit somebody in a prison.<br /> <br /> Ellery: Oh, were you? I had no idea you were an attorney, so you know a little bit about how prisons are a whole...another world<br /> <br /> Debbi: They sure are. Yeah, and kind of scary when you first walk into them.<br /> <br /> Ellery: Absolutely. Can be a real culture shock for somebody that's never been in a prison before.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Absolutely. For someone who doesn't know, what is your role as a forensic psychologist? What is it that you do?<br /> <br /> Ellery: A forensic psychologist is a psychologist that has anything to do with the law, so it's really about the intersection of psychology and the law, and forensic psychologists do a lot of different things. Usually in the popular media, you think of people like Alex Cross or Clarice Starling, but forensic psychologists do a lot of different things. They can be involved in things like child custody cases or in determination of disability. What I do specifically is violence risk assessment, so I work for the Board of Parole Hearings in California, and I assess long-term inmates who have been in prison for many years, Debbi Mack 28:42
Interview with Crime Writer Rod Sadler: S. 7, Ep. 14 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-rod-sadler-s-7-ep-14/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-rod-sadler-s-7-ep-14 Sun, 26 Dec 2021 05:05:20 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22519 This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer Rod Sadler. Check out his thoughts about the upcoming release on parole of a convicted serial killer. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Download a PDF copy of the interview here. Debbi: Hi everyone. My final guest of 2021 had a 30-year career in law enforcement before turning his hand to writing true crime. He has three books out: To Hell I Must Go: The True Story of Michigan's Lizzie Borden, A Slayer Waits: The true story of a Michigan double murder, and his latest, Killing Women. I'm pleased to introduce my guest, Rod Sadler. Hi Rod. How are you doing today? [01:34] Rod: Hello, Debbi. Thank you so much for having me. I am doing just great and I have really been looking forward to this. [01:40] Debbi: Fantastic. Well, I have to tell you, your guest post. I really appreciate your being here, first of all, talking to us. Your guest post was most interesting, I have to say. I would think having an actual pen pal, if you'll excuse the pun, who is a serial killer would be interesting. [02:02] Rod: Yeah. And I will tell you, it's much less than a pen pal. I guess it was for a short time, but when the first letter arrived—actually just to take a short side note here, if you're ever going to start a letter to a serial killer, let me give you a piece of advice, and this is directly from my wife. Do it with someone else's return address. She was less than pleased when we started getting letters from him, so... [02:33] Debbi: I can easily imagine. I can just imagine. What drew you to writing true crime in general? And the reason I ask is that there are so many police officers that I've interviewed and some of them write crime fiction and some of them write true crime. How did you pick true crime? What drew to that as opposed to fiction? [03:02] Rod: Well, it actually started as a genealogy project back in—oh my gosh—early in my career. I became a police officer in the early 80s and I worked for a campus police department. I'll try to make this short because I can ramble on, but my great-great grandfather had served as the sheriff in the county that we live in, and so I started doing some genealogy about him just to find out a little bit more. I was going through old newspapers and I found an article from 1897 describing this gruesome murder in the small town where I grew up and it menti... This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer Rod Sadler.

Check out his thoughts about the upcoming release on parole of a convicted serial killer.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

Download a PDF copy of the interview here.

Debbi: Hi everyone. My final guest of 2021 had a 30-year career in law enforcement before turning his hand to writing true crime. He has three books out: To Hell I Must Go: The True Story of Michigan’s Lizzie Borden, A Slayer Waits: The true story of a Michigan double murder, and his latest, Killing Women. I’m pleased to introduce my guest, Rod Sadler. Hi Rod. How are you doing today?

[01:34] Rod: Hello, Debbi. Thank you so much for having me. I am doing just great and I have really been looking forward to this.

[01:40] Debbi: Fantastic. Well, I have to tell you, your guest post. I really appreciate your being here, first of all, talking to us. Your guest post was most interesting, I have to say. I would think having an actual pen pal, if you’ll excuse the pun, who is a serial killer would be interesting.

[02:02] Rod: Yeah. And I will tell you, it’s much less than a pen pal. I guess it was for a short time, but when the first letter arrived—actually just to take a short side note here, if you’re ever going to start a letter to a serial killer, let me give
you a piece of advice, and this is directly from my wife. Do it with someone else’s return address. She was less than pleased when we started getting letters from him, so…

[02:33] Debbi: I can easily imagine. I can just imagine. What drew you to writing true crime in general? And the reason I
ask is that there are so many police officers that I’ve interviewed and some of them write crime fiction and some of them write true crime. How did you pick true crime? What drew to that as opposed to fiction?

[03:02] Rod: Well, it actually started as a genealogy project back in—oh my gosh—early in my career. I became a police officer in the early 80s and I worked for a campus police department. I’ll try to make this short because I can ramble on, but my great-great grandfather had served as the sheriff in the county that we live in, and so I started doing some genealogy about him just to find out a little bit more. I was going through old newspapers and I found an article from 1897 describing this gruesome murder in the small town where I grew up and it mentioned my great-great grandfather’s name, and the murder was so bizarre that I thought this would make a great book and I put it off and put it off for my entire career until I retired in 2012. And then I put that first book together and I had so much fun, I thought this is it. True crime is my retirement job.

I was going through old newspapers and I found an article from 1897 describing this gruesome murder in the small town where I grew up and it mentioned my great-great grandfather’s name, and the murder was so bizarre that I thought this would make a great book and I put it off and put it off for my entire career until I retired in 2012.

[04:09] Debbi: Hmm. Yeah. So, it started with a genealogy project. That’s very interesting. Have you always been into genealogy?

[04:19] Rod: You know, more so when I retired and I had more time. I always was fascinated by the fact that my great-great grandfather had been the sheriff, an elected official and I was able through family members to get his badge and gun and handcuffs from 1897 and those are priceless to me. In doing my research for my first book, I went to the archives of Michigan and they had the original court file from 1897 that had a handwritten statement from my great-great grandfather about what he had seen at this particular murder scene, and that to me was like gold. And so, I have become more interested in genealogy since then, yes.

[05:14] Debbi: It is an interesting subject. How much historical research apart from official records do you do on your books?

[05:26] Rod: I try to get everything that I can, and I use a great internet resource newspapers.com, which is invaluable. And because I have experience in seeking out police records through Freedom of Information Act, that’s what I try to do if the case is actually something that they might still have. And by that, I mean I was able to locate for my second book a murder in 1955, I was able to locate the original police file, mostly through attorneys that were involved in it. They were elderly, but still practicing law. My last book, which I’m sure we’ll talk about here shortly, I was able to get the entire police file and the book that I hope to have published by this summer, I was able to get a 60-year-old police file from the Michigan state police. So historic information I try to get mostly through newspapers.com and through original court documents and police files.

I try to get everything that I can, and I use a great internet resource newspapers.com, which is invaluable. And because I have experience in seeking out police records through Freedom of Information Act, that’s what I try to do if the case is actually something that they might still have.

[06:46] Debbi: That’s the safest bet, isn’t it?

[06:48] Rod: Oh, it’s the most accurate that I have found.

[06:51] Debbi: Yes. Yeah. That’s where you can get actual official things that people have said under oath and so forth.

[06:59] Rod: Yeah, exactly.

[07:00] Debbi: Yeah. How did you get interested in Don Miller’s case? You were interested before he started writing you, right?

[07:09] Rod: I’m sorry.

[07:10] Debbi: You were interested in his case before he started writing you, correct?

[07:15] Rod: I was. Early in my police career—actually before my police career—I was graduating from high school when this was going on. Don Miller was arrested for sexual assault and attempted murder of two teenagers the year that I graduated from high school. I already knew that I was going to go into law enforcement as a career. I had my college curriculum all laid out and in a couple months I was going to start at the community college, and so I kind of followed the headlines because it was a high-profile case. It was literally 20 miles from where I lived and it involved a criminal justice student by the name of Don Miller, who was the prime suspect in all of these particular incidents. And so, I did follow it while it progressed through the court system, and then when he was sentenced to prison in 1979 for 30 to 50 years, everybody thought, hey, we don’t have to worry about Don Miller anymore. Well, guess where we are today? We’re worrying about Don Miller again.

It was literally 20 miles from where I lived and it involved a criminal justice student by the name of Don Miller, who was the prime suspect in all of these particular incidents.

[08:29] Debbi: Yeah. Do you do a lot of interviews or do you mainly rely on official documents?

[08:39] Rod: I do both, actually. In the Don Miller case, one of the things that attracted me to it late in my … well, actually in retirement was the fact that over the years I had become friends, professional colleague friends with numerous people that were directly involved in that case, and that included everybody from the initial officer who took the first missing person complaint in 1977, right up to Don Miller’s own defense attorney and the prosecuting attorney that put him in prison. I probably knew 75% of the people involved in that case, and so I interviewed about 75% of the people involved in that case. And then I relied on court to transcripts and police reports.

I had become friends, professional colleague friends with numerous people that were directly involved in that case, and that included everybody from the initial officer who took the first missing person complaint in 1977, right up to Don Miller’s own defense attorney and the prosecuting attorney that put him in prison.

[09:38] Debbi: How do you keep all the information organized as you collect it?

[09:44] Rod: Oh boy, that’s a tough one. For my first book, it was just kind of a hodgepodge of notes and things, but then as I progressed to my second and my third book, I kind of came up with a system, if you will, where I simply categorize the news articles in one folder and court documents in another and interviews in another, and I try to put things chronologically. That’s how my books progress. Actually, I begin at the very end when the body is located—or bodies in the Don Miller case—and then I jump right to the beginning. So, it’s kind of like a little teaser, if you will.

[10:33] Debbi: So basically, your concern discussed in the book about the release of this person on parole is that he basically is unreleasable?

[10:50] Rod: Well, I would say yes. He is a serial killer. He’s taken the lives of four women, and he tried to take the life of a 14-year-old girl after he raped her in 1978, and it’s alarming to a lot of people that he will be released if he doesn’t get parole, but he will be released in 2031. it’s important for people to understand that Don Miller’s not in prison right now for murder. He’s only in prison right now for possessing a strangulation device in his prison cell. He was originally sent to prison for the rape and attempted murder of two teenagers, and then he was charged with two counts of second-degree murder. But before that ever went to trial, he was offered a plea deal. And that plea deal stated that if he would lead police to the bodies of two missing women, then they would reduce the charges to manslaughter. He could plead guilty to those and serve 15-year sentences at the same time that he was serving the 30 to 50 years for the rape, if that makes sense. And so, everybody at that time thought, hey, we don’t have to worry about Don Miller anymore.

Except back in the 70s, Michigan did not have a Truth in Sentencing law, and what that means is—and I’ll use myself as an example—if I were sentenced to five to 10 years today, I would have to serve a minimum of five years without any chance of parole. Back then, you might get five or 10 years in prison and be out in two or three, based on good time and things like that. And so, by the late 90s, Don Miller was ready to get out of prison and authorities found a strangulation device in his cell and he was charged with that and subsequently convicted, and that really is the only reason that he’s still in prison.

[13:13] Debbi: Now he’s in a psychiatric hospital, correct?

[13:17] Rod: No, he’s not.

[13:17] Debbi: He’s in prison? Okay. I had the impression that he claimed some kind of insanity or diminished capacity or something.

[13:27] Rod: He did. He claimed insanity. He claimed that there were demons in the house where these teens were and that he was going in to rid them of the demons. That defense fell through and he was convicted.

[13:48] Debbi: Hmm. Yeah. Let’s see—is there a usual amount of time you’ll have to research versus writing the book?

[13:57] Rod: I usually spend two or three months doing my research first and getting things organized so that I know how to go back and find something if I need it, because there is just so much. The cases that I choose, there just seems to be so much information available and so much information out there that I really have to organize it. And actually, the last book that I’ve completed that is with my agent right now, in that particular case, I had 2000 pages of police reports from 1960, and I had to categorize those into a 10-page spreadsheet, which was a task in and of itself.

[14:47] Debbi: Yes. Yes. It would be. Just getting all that together and organizing it so that it comes out in a narrative form must be a challenge.

[14:56] Rod: Oh, yes. Yes, it is.

[14:58] Debbi: I could just imagine. What authors inspire you the most, and what do you read for pleasure?

[15:08] Rod: You know, I get asked that a lot and I can remember as a kid that my favorite books were true stories. It was a series by an English author by the name of James Herriot. He wrote All Creatures Great and Small, and a whole series of books about being an English veterinarian back in the 30s and 40s. I loved that series, but I also because I was going into law enforcement became a big fan of Joseph Wambaugh, who was a huge nonfiction writer back in the 70s, and I loved his books too. And so, I would say if I had to choose two authors, those would be the two that probably influenced me the most.

[16:00] Debbi: Very interesting. I know other police officers have said that to me also that Wambaugh was an influence. He wrote very realistically about the police department.

[16:12] Rod: He did. And Los Angeles. California is a lot different than Eaton County, Michigan. but yet I still have a flair for Michigan law enforcement and I think I write about it well.

[16:29] Debbi: Very good. And what is it you’re working on now? You said you’re finishing something up that you hope to get out next year.

[16:37] Rod: Yes. I have a cold case, a 60-year-old cold case that occurred here in Michigan. It is still unsolved, and I have maybe the name of a person that they should look at that I believe is still alive and in prison right now for murder.

[16:58] Debbi: Interesting. Well, it sounds very intriguing. What advice would you give to someone interested in writing for a living?

[17:07] Rod: Oh, I would say my biggest piece of advice is that you have to practice patience. I guess maybe some people can sit down and begin writing a book and not think about it, but when I’m doing a true crime where I have to put facts down and be factual through the whole thing, you have to take time to gather that information and then you have to take time to formulate how you want to do it, and then you have to take time to do the writing. And then beyond that, the whole publishing process is a whole other animal. And so, the biggest thing I can say is to be patient with yourself.

I would say my biggest piece of advice [for aspiring authors] is that you have to practice patience.

[17:58] Debbi: Absolutely. I so agree with you. I just going to ask you something and now of course it slipped my mind. I hate when that happens.

[18:09] Rod: Welcome to my world.

[18:12] Debbi: Yeah. I’m afraid I’m joining that world. Oh, I know what I was going to ask. About the marketing. Yeah, about marketing. What do you do to market your book? Are you doing book signings? Do you do just virtual events or do just do social media, or …?

[18:32] Rod: Actually, I’ve only done one real virtual event. That was interesting. It was fun. I got to meet some other authors virtually but I do a lot of book signings. I try to throughout the year, because they’re Michigan based crimes. They are mostly in Michigan. There’s a huge—oh, what’s the term I’m looking for? A tourist stop about halfway up the state, mid-state in Clare, Michigan and it’s called Cops & Doughnuts. It is a donut shop that’s owned by 13 retired police officers, and it’s police-themed, hence the name. They have books there and they carry my books, and that to me is huge. I think that my upcoming book, I’ll be traveling north for that because that’s where that particular crime occurred, but I do a lot of book signings.

Social media is a big part, mostly Facebook. I do a little bit of Twitter, but I get discouraged by Twitter. It just seems that most of the other authors on there. Not everyone, but most of them are just looking for those likes and I haven’t found it to be a very good marketing opportunity. I’m just starting a little bit on TikTok to throw some videos out about my books to see if that helps at all. But I will say that the local media here in the mid-Michigan area has done an absolutely fantastic job with all three of my first books. It was front page in all of the local newspapers, and really word of mouth, too. Word of mouth helps. So, I kind of use a little bit of everything.

[20:43] Debbi: Oh, that’s fantastic that you got front page coverage somewhere.

[20:47] Rod: I did. I did on all three books and I was so excited about that.

[20:51] Debbi: That is fantastic. Congratulations.

[20:54] Rod: Thank you.

[20:56] Debbi: Is there anything else you’d like to add before we finish up?

[21:00] Rod: I will tell you that some people get confused with my first book, the subtitle because it’s called To Hell I Must Go: The True Story of Michigan’s Lizzie Borden, and people look at that and they go Lizzy Borden wasn’t from Michigan. It’s the way that I worded that. It should have been the true story of a woman some might refer to as Michigan’s version of Lizzy Borden.

[21:28] Debbi: But that seems kind of long, doesn’t it?

[21:32] Rod: It is. It’s very long so I just have to deal with that. I did a lot of research when I did my books. The first two, I designed the covers myself. I did some research on what to look for and how to do a good cover, how to title a book, things like that, because I got into this industry knowing nothing about it. Everything that I learned, I had to research and I’m still learning. I’ll probably be learning until the day I die about ways to improve. So again, the biggest thing I can say to anybody that wants to be a writer out there is please be patient with yourself.

[22:19] Debbi: That is so true. Patience is essential in this field.

[22:24] Rod: It is absolutely essential.

[22:26] Debbi: There’s too much hard work. There’s too much criticism, too much at stake. Too many books, the whole thing. It’s like you have to really be good and really kind of focus your efforts in the right places, I think.

[22:46] Rod: Right. Exactly.

[22:48] Debbi: That’s the thing. Well, I just want to thank you so much for being here. It was great talking to you and hearing about these cases.

[22:56] Rod: Oh, it was my pleasure and I appreciate you having me

[23:00] Debbi: Well, it was my pleasure, too, and thank you so much.

[23:03] Rod: Thank you.

[23:04] Debbi: Sure thing! In closing, I’ll just say that right now, you can get any of my books for half off from Smashwords until the end of the year, or actually the beginning of next year, because I believe the sale ends January 1st. So, pick up a copy of either of the Crime Cafe ebooks. The box set is half off and the short story anthology is free for a limited time, as well as all my novels. All half off, including my latest Fatal Connections, so download away.

To all of you, thanks so much for listening. Have a great holiday and the best wishes for the new year. My next guest after a short break will be Ellery Kane. That’s Ellery Kane, not Ellery Queen. That would be weird. Until next time, happy holidays and happy reading.

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This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer Rod Sadler. - Check out his thoughts about the upcoming release on parole of a convicted serial killer. - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer Rod Sadler.<br /> <br /> Check out his thoughts about the upcoming release on parole of a convicted serial killer.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Download a PDF copy of the interview here.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. My final guest of 2021 had a 30-year career in law enforcement before turning his hand to writing true crime. He has three books out: To Hell I Must Go: The True Story of Michigan's Lizzie Borden, A Slayer Waits: The true story of a Michigan double murder, and his latest, Killing Women. I'm pleased to introduce my guest, Rod Sadler. Hi Rod. How are you doing today?<br /> <br /> [01:34] Rod: Hello, Debbi. Thank you so much for having me. I am doing just great and I have really been looking forward to this.<br /> <br /> [01:40] Debbi: Fantastic. Well, I have to tell you, your guest post. I really appreciate your being here, first of all, talking to us. Your guest post was most interesting, I have to say. I would think having an actual pen pal, if you'll excuse the pun, who is a serial killer would be interesting.<br /> <br /> [02:02] Rod: Yeah. And I will tell you, it's much less than a pen pal. I guess it was for a short time, but when the first letter arrived—actually just to take a short side note here, if you're ever going to start a letter to a serial killer, let me give<br /> you a piece of advice, and this is directly from my wife. Do it with someone else's return address. She was less than pleased when we started getting letters from him, so...<br /> <br /> [02:33] Debbi: I can easily imagine. I can just imagine. What drew you to writing true crime in general? And the reason I<br /> ask is that there are so many police officers that I've interviewed and some of them write crime fiction and some of them write true crime. How did you pick true crime? What drew to that as opposed to fiction?<br /> <br /> [03:02] Rod: Well, it actually started as a genealogy project back in—oh my gosh—early in my career. I became a police officer in the early 80s and I worked for a campus police department. I'll try to make this short because I can ramble on, but my great-great grandfather had served as the sheriff in the county that we live in, and so I started doing some genealogy about him just to ... Debbi Mack 25:16
Interview with Crime Writer David Kushner: S. 7, Ep. 13 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-david-kushner-s-7-ep-13/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-david-kushner-s-7-ep-13 Sun, 19 Dec 2021 05:05:51 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22494 This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer David Kushner. Check out our discussion his nine-part series on Substack about a murder at the Texas Renaissance Fair and other writing. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi, everyone. Today, it's my pleasure to have with me an award-winning journalist and author. And along with writing true crime and non-fiction graphic novels, he's written for a variety of major periodicals. Today, we'll focus on his writing for a newsletter he has on Substack called Disruptor. My guest today is David Kushner. Hi, David. Thanks for being with us today. David: Hi, thanks for having me. Debbi: Well, no problem. It's a pleasure for me. I was reading over what you wrote on Substack about the festival. The Texas Renaissance Festival. What prompted your interest in the crime that took place at this festival? David: Well, I had gone to the Texas Renaissance Festival. Actually, it was about 17 years ago to do a story on it for FHM magazine, which was a men's magazine at the time and I was interested in it for a couple reasons. One was because it's the world's largest renaissance festival. It's in kind of the middle of a small town, that's a town of about 100 people outside of Houston. So, it's kind of in the middle of nowhere. And this guy George Coulam who came there in the 70s and incorporated the town. Became mayor and then essentially transformed the town into a working recreation of a Renaissance Village, all that was super fascinating to me. And I went there and I was there for a few days reporting the story. Then at one point, when I was leaving the festival one night, a scuffle broke out very close to me and a lot of shouting and a crowd formed. And I got out of there, you know don't want to be in a situation like that. But what I later found out was that actually somebody had gotten killed in that fight. Somebody was stabbed multiple times and it was a terrible, obviously, terrible tragedy. It's something that I always thought about having just kind of brushed up so close to it. And then as things went, this magazine went out of business. I never wrote this story, but I thought about it for 17 years. And then I finally decided, you know, I have this newsletter and I thought there's a different way maybe I can approach telling it and telling it i... This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer David Kushner.

Check out our discussion his nine-part series on Substack about a murder at the Texas Renaissance Fair and other writing.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.

Debbi: Hi, everyone. Today, it’s my pleasure to have with me an award-winning journalist and author. And along with writing true crime and non-fiction graphic novels, he’s written for a variety of major periodicals. Today, we’ll focus on his writing for a newsletter he has on Substack called Disruptor. My guest today is David Kushner. Hi, David. Thanks for being with us today.

David: Hi, thanks for having me.

Debbi: Well, no problem. It’s a pleasure for me. I was reading over what you wrote on Substack about the festival. The Texas Renaissance Festival. What prompted your interest in the crime that took place at this festival?

David: Well, I had gone to the Texas Renaissance Festival. Actually, it was about 17 years ago to do a story on it for FHM magazine, which was a men’s magazine at the time and I was interested in it for a couple reasons. One was because it’s the world’s largest renaissance festival. It’s in kind of the middle of a small town, that’s a town of about 100 people outside of Houston. So, it’s kind of in the middle of nowhere. And this guy George Coulam who came there in the 70s and incorporated the town. Became mayor and then essentially transformed the town into a working recreation of a Renaissance Village, all that was super fascinating to me. And I went there and I was there for a few days reporting the story.
Then at one point, when I was leaving the festival one night, a scuffle broke out very close to me and a lot of shouting and a crowd formed. And I got out of there, you know don’t want to be in a situation like that. But what I later found out was that actually somebody had gotten killed in that fight. Somebody was stabbed multiple times and it was a terrible, obviously, terrible tragedy. It’s something that I always thought about having just kind of brushed up so close to it. And then as things went, this magazine went out of business. I never wrote this story, but I thought about it for 17 years. And then I finally decided, you know, I have this newsletter and I thought there’s a different way maybe I can approach telling it and telling it in kind of a bit of a more multimedia way I guess you might say. And so, that’s how it all came about.

I had gone to the Texas Renaissance Festival. Actually, it was about 17 years ago to do a story on it for FHM magazine, which was a men’s magazine at the time and I was interested in it for a couple reasons. One was because it’s the world’s largest renaissance festival. It’s in kind of the middle of a small town, that’s a town of about 100 people outside of Houston.

Debbi: Yeah, it was very multimedia. You had the clip in there with I think it was Leeza Gibbons.

David: Yeah.

Debbi: Thought that was very interesting. There are a couple of things that struck me about your story. First of all, the way this guy bought up this land.

David: Yeah.

Debbi: Essentially starting this town that he owns pretty much and is mayor of.

David: Right.

Debbi: And it’s almost like a unique niche company town or something.

David: Yeah, it’s true. I mean it’s interesting that he went in there and incorporated the town and like I said became mayor. And then what, he needed people to work. His idea, he really came out of the Renaissance Festivals, came out of the kind of, I guess you would say hippie culture of like 60s, 70s. He was a part of that and he took it really seriously. He was an artist. He worked on stained glass and all of that. And there’s kind of a nomadic community around these Renaissance Festivals and they traveled from festival to festival. They also look for somewhere to stay during the off season.

I mean it’s interesting that he went in there and incorporated the town and like I said became mayor. And then what, he needed people to work. His idea, he really came out of the Renaissance Festivals, came out of the kind of, I guess you would say hippie culture of like 60s, 70s. He was a part of that and he took it really seriously.

So, he had all of these ideas that he could kind of create a place that would be a really impressive festival but also be a place where people could come—Rennie’s as they’re called—could come in the off season. So, and to do this, he needed help. So, he started recruiting the locals who were skeptical certainly at first and they were coming from two different worlds completely. And but he taught them middle English. He taught them how to dress. He taught them how to kind of behave. And they embraced it, because it was a source of income for them and it became a passion for a lot of people in that area.

Debbi: Yeah. Very very interesting. The other thing that struck me about it was the shocking level of violence between people who barely knew each other. And these days that there are shocking, shockingly violent events that that take place.

David: Yeah.

Debbi: Way too often. But when I think about this level of violence in this particular crowd that certainly must have had an effect of some sort.

David: Yeah.

Debbi: Can you talk about that in general in terms of the effect as well as, is this indicative of anything in particular?

David: I mean it may be indicative of what happens when people, you know I don’t know. I think that tragedies can happen anytime, anyplace. This is a place where people are spending the day and night drinking a lot, partying a lot. The idea’s that you’re living in this somewhat hedonistic fantasy of what it was like during that time, people are jousting men or men, women or women, that kind of an attitude. So, in a way it’s very retrograde actually, but and most people go there and have a great time and it’s just fun and it’s like a theme park. So, I mean if I could break out outside Disney World. But in this case, I think you had an individual who clearly had been drinking and been doing drugs. And then another individual who was in the wrong place, the wrong time, really had tried to help out this other person in ways that I describe an article and then, that quickly went south.

But in this case, I think you had an individual who clearly had been drinking and been doing drugs. And then another individual who was in the wrong place, the wrong time, really had tried to help out this other person in ways that I describe an article and then, that quickly went south.

Debbi: That’s for sure. It’s amazing, isn’t it? What made you interested in writing your books?

David: My books?

Debbi: Yes.

David: I guess I had just been in college. I started writing for the school newspaper and I enjoyed that. That was a way that I could get free CDs and concert tickets at the time. So, I was very opportunistic. And then I really enjoyed it. I grew, around that time I had been reading a lot of what were called the new journalists, people who are writing, magazines like Rolling Stone. So, Hunter Thompson and Tom Wolfe and Joan Didion and people like that and so I just really became attracted to that kind of writing. It was what we call now like narrative nonfiction. So, true stories that read like fiction that are really deeply reported and where the reporting is immersive and you’re really trying to get to know people again. Find out what makes them tick and bring them to life.

I grew, around that time I had been reading a lot of what were called the new journalists, people who are writing, magazines like Rolling Stone. So, Hunter Thompson and Tom Wolfe and Joan Didion and people like that and so I just really became attracted to that kind of writing.

So, that was my interest and then I started in the pretty much in the early 90’s kind of writing about the nascent internet. Which was starting to happen in gaming and hackers. And I felt like that was a relatively undocumented culture and industry. So, I kind of raised my hand and said, hey, I’d like to write about this stuff. And eventually people gave me a break and that led to a series of books.

Debbi: Well, I have to say that you write on a variety of topics. Impressive variety. Music, travel, business, true crime. Have I missed anything? Pop culture.

David: I mean for me it’s really, one thing I learned and it’s I do teach journalism occasionally. And I think that when a lot of people are starting out, I did this myself I mean I’ll never forget I pitched one of the first stories I pitched Rolling Stone was I think I just wrote a letter saying like, hey, why don’t I write about monster trucks. And which is probably the worst pitch you could ever give, whether or not you’re interested in monster trucks. But what took me a long time to learn was that it’s you can’t just pitch a topic. It’s not about something being cool. It’s really like what’s the story? What’s the drama? What’s the conflict? Who are the characters?

But what took me a long time to learn was that it’s you can’t just pitch a topic. It’s not about something being cool. It’s really like what’s the story? What’s the drama? What’s the conflict? Who are the characters?

So, for me that’s really what it’s about. It’s a little bit about the worlds, too. I mean I was interested in the world of these renaissance festivals just having gone to them as a kid. But it’s not enough to just want to write about a festival. Originally, for me it was a profile of this guy and the conflict was how does this guy come to the middle of a kind of cowboy town in the middle of nowhere and turn it into the world’s largest Renaissance Festival. That to me was interesting. So, in the conflict between him and the community and then that ended up becoming a crime story. So, that’s kind of how I approach it. I mean I’m interested in a world but really comes down to the characters in the story and like what happened.

Debbi: Isn’t that really what it’s always all about?

David: Yeah. I mean, I think.

Debbi: Whether it’s fiction or non-fiction.

David: Yeah, I think so and I think that like, people we’re, we’re storytellers like that’s how we organize our lives and information. I think another good way to think about it is just like how would you, when something happens and you tell a friend or a family member. Or like, oh gosh, you wouldn’t believe what happened. If you listen to how you tell that story, what are the stories that you tell? How do you tell them? That’s kind of a bit of my thought process too about how I approach something. So, in this case, it would be like this guy, who the world’s largest Renaissance Festival is actually in the middle of this kind of small cowboy town and they’ve had all these crimes and things like that. So, I don’t know. It’s just setting it up for the conflict. I think it’s the approach.

I think that like, people we’re, we’re storytellers like that’s how we organize our lives and information. I think another good way to think about it is just like how would you, when something happens and you tell a friend or a family member.

Debbi: Yeah. What prompted you to start writing for Substack?

David: A few things, I mean, one is that I, there are a lot of stories that I want to tell. I mean, I’m never really at a loss for them but it takes a while with magazines and all of that. The production process is lengthier and so on. So, I want to have an outlet where I could just kind of do my own thing, when I felt like it and tell my own stories in ways that I want to do it. Like the Renaissance Texas is, it’s a 9-part story filled with all kinds of different things. So, that that’s really was my interest was just to have an outlet for where I could be a bit more flexible, and kind of creative and how I approach this.

Debbi: And what kind of reception has it gotten from readers?

David: Yeah, I mean it’s nice to have a kind of a direct way of reaching people. It feels more kind of intimate in a way. Almost feels like a class. Like I’ve taught classes and although this isn’t, you know it’s not a class but there a sense of like okay, we’re all together here. Here’s the story I’m going to be parsing out. I’m doing, I have this other long form project on there, called Masters of Disruption: How the Gamer Generation Built the Future. Which builds on ideas from my first book Masters of Doom, which was about actually some guys in Texas who made the games Doom and Quake. Which are among the most popular franchises in that industry.

So, that’s a project where once a week I’m kind of telling the story that played out in the time that I wrote the book, after that sorry I wrote the book. So yeah, it’s just a different kind of conversation that I can have with readers.

Debbi: Do you make use of the messaging function? Do you tend to do a lot of interacting?

David: I don’t at all. Probably considered, I don’t know bad form or not wise. But the thing is it’s like I have been doing this for a long time. And if I’m going to do something like I really want to do it and engage. And for me, I certainly understand the value of community online and I have written so much about it but I’m the kind of guy at the party who stands in the corner and then kind of leaves. So, that’s been my approach to social media, whether it’s better or worse. And so for me, I’m just focusing on telling the stories and people email me, it’s always great to hear from people. But that’s kind of how I’ve managed it.

Debbi: Boy, do I hear you when you say that, the one who stands in the corner.

David: Yes, correct.

Debbi: Let’s see. Have you thought about turning the series into an eBook?

David: No, I mean, for me, this is a forum onto itself. This is its own thing and it’s a way that I’ve kind of created three buckets on there. One is this long-form project Masters of Disruption. The other one are original feature stories that I’m creating just for the newsletter, such as the Texas story. I did another one recently about called Lunch Ladies, which was about a heist that took place at a high school in Connecticut by some of the lunch ladies and the food director who stole hundreds of thousands of dollars from the school. And then I have another section, the reporter’s notebook where I’m looking back at some stories from my archive and sharing them and kind of reconsidering them, telling some of the behind the scenes.

This is its own thing and it’s a way that I’ve kind of created three buckets on there. One is this long-form project Masters of Disruption. The other one are original feature stories that I’m creating just for the newsletter, such as the Texas story. … And then I have another section, the reporter’s notebook where I’m looking back at some stories from my archive and sharing them and kind of reconsidering them, telling some of the behind the scenes.

Debbi: Cool. Very cool. What writers inspire you most and what do you like to read?

David: Well, the good and bad thing about my job is that I’m reading all the time for whatever I’m writing. So, if like right now I’m working on a story that deals with remote working, for example. I’m reading a lot about that. It’s very kind of academic in a way. But then I’ll also read books that are related to what I’m working on. Unfortunately, I don’t get a ton of time. I don’t make a ton of time to read for pleasure because I’m just always reading for work. But work is pleasurable, so it all sort of fits together. The things that I write about interest me, so that my reading is connected to my writing. But yeah, and that’s kind of what my reading life is like.

Debbi: Well, I can understand that completely.

David: Yeah.

Debbi: What advice would you give to someone who would like to have a career as a writer?

David: The advice that I give to someone who wants a career as a writer is to write. I mean I don’t honestly, like that really, it’s the simplest advice and it sounds maybe glib. But that’s really it, you just have to do it. Like that’s the difference. I mean I think a lot of people start and they don’t finish because they don’t write. You have to write a lot and you have to deal with an enormous amount of rejection. The rejection is something that will never end, no matter who you are. So, I think writing and persevering are the most important things.

The advice that I give to someone who wants a career as a writer is to write. I mean I don’t honestly, like that really, it’s the simplest advice and it sounds maybe glib. But that’s really it, you just have to do it.

And the other thing that I tell people who are journalists and who are starting out, it’s kind of like the write about you know thing. But more specifically, if you’re out there and you’re wanting to make a career as a journalist, there are a lot of people out there writing. What do you know about that people don’t know about? Maybe it’s your local community something that happened there. Look in your own backyard. Tell the stories that you have an expertise in. so, I think thinking locally and looking in your own community is a good way to get started too.

Debbi: I’m glad to hear you say that because I was going to ask you about your thoughts about the future of local journalism.

David: Oh yeah, it’s depressing what’s happening to local newspapers for sure. So, I think on one hand, the industry is obviously in a lot of turmoil and transformation in flux. But that said, there’s also opportunity. So, I know that Substack has been working on some local journalism programs. Things of that nature. So, while the old traditional outlets are changing and shrinking. You have new ones forming. The real issue and the real loss that it that I don’t know that people think about exactly, but it’s the structure that’s the infrastructure of a local newspaper. You’ve got editors. You’ve got fact checking. You’ve got copy editing. Like there are a lot of hands and eyes and minds that are going into every story which is going to give you a different level of quality of the content.

Oh yeah, it’s depressing what’s happening to local newspapers for sure. So, I think on one hand, the industry is obviously in a lot of turmoil and transformation in flux. But that said, there’s also opportunity.

So, if it’s the internet and it’s just one person telling you what they think, there’s nothing wrong with that. But it’s not necessarily being held to as rigorous as standard for news. So, this gets into a much deeper question, problem about analytical thinking, critical thinking, and how we consume media which is a struggle.

Debbi: Yeah. Boy. You said a mouthful right there. Is there anything else you’d like to say before we finish up?

David: I don’t know. I don’t, thanks for having me. It was great to talk about all of this stuff. And yeah, I mean, I would encourage people to just check out my newsletter which is DavidKushner.substack.com and usually, I’m posting there a couple times a week.

Debbi: Alright. Well, thank you so much again.

David: Sure.

Debbi: And in closing, I’d like to remind everyone that you can buy the Crime Cafe box set and anthology from any major online retailer and several minor ones as well. You can also get a free copy of each if you become a supporter on Patreon. So, check out the Patreon page. I hope you’ll give that a look. And if you did enjoy this interview, please leave a review. I’d appreciate it. It helps the show a lot. On my next show, I’ll be interviewing crime writer Rod Sadler. In the meantime, take care and happy.

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This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer David Kushner. - Check out our discussion his nine-part series on Substack about a murder at the Texas Renaissance Fair and other writing. - This is the Crime Cafe, This episode of the Crime Cafe podcast features my interview with crime writer David Kushner.<br /> <br /> Check out our discussion his nine-part series on Substack about a murder at the Texas Renaissance Fair and other writing.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, everyone. Today, it's my pleasure to have with me an award-winning journalist and author. And along with writing true crime and non-fiction graphic novels, he's written for a variety of major periodicals. Today, we'll focus on his writing for a newsletter he has on Substack called Disruptor. My guest today is David Kushner. Hi, David. Thanks for being with us today.<br /> <br /> David: Hi, thanks for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Well, no problem. It's a pleasure for me. I was reading over what you wrote on Substack about the festival. The Texas Renaissance Festival. What prompted your interest in the crime that took place at this festival?<br /> <br /> David: Well, I had gone to the Texas Renaissance Festival. Actually, it was about 17 years ago to do a story on it for FHM magazine, which was a men's magazine at the time and I was interested in it for a couple reasons. One was because it's the world's largest renaissance festival. It's in kind of the middle of a small town, that's a town of about 100 people outside of Houston. So, it's kind of in the middle of nowhere. And this guy George Coulam who came there in the 70s and incorporated the town. Became mayor and then essentially transformed the town into a working recreation of a Renaissance Village, all that was super fascinating to me. And I went there and I was there for a few days reporting the story.<br /> Then at one point, when I was leaving the festival one night, a scuffle broke out very close to me and a lot of shouting and a crowd formed. And I got out of there, you know don't want to be in a situation like that. But what I later found out was that actually somebody had gotten killed in that fight. Somebody was stabbed multiple times and it was a terrible, obviously, terrible tragedy. It's something that I always thought about having just kind of brushed up so close to it. And then as things went, this magazine went out of business. I never wrote this story, but I thought about it for 17 years. Debbi Mack 24:59
Interview with Crime Writer John Gaspard: S. 7, Ep. 12 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-john-gaspard-s-7-ep-12/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-john-gaspard-s-7-ep-12 Sun, 12 Dec 2021 05:05:14 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22456 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer John Gaspard. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi everyone. Our guest today is the author of the Eli Marks mystery series. He also writes the Como Lake Players mystery series under the pen name Bobbie Raymond. Bobbie Raymond. I believe I have that right. In addition to three standalone novels, he has written several books about low budget filmmaking. Now that's an interesting subject. Coming to us from Minnesota, my guest today is John Gaspard. Hi, John, did I pronounce that correctly? John: You did. You pronounced it one of the two ways that is acceptable. My wife is more persistent about Ronnie Gaspard, but I've always had Gaspard so I answer to either one. Debbi: Gaspard. Very French. John: Yes. Oh yes. It's like Smith in the phone book over there. Debbi: All right. Okay. By the way, I love the short story that you provided for your guest post. John: Great! Thank you. Debbi: I just want to say that if you out there have not read it, any listeners have not read it, I would highly recommend you go to my blog and take a look at it. It's fun and it even comes with an animated video, which I loved. it's on my blog on my website and it's a great way to sample John's writing and Eli Marks. What prompted you to write this particular series about this kind of protagonist? John: Well, boy, that's a really good question. I had written a standalone suspense novel called The Ripperologists about people who are experts on Jack the Ripper who have to solve a current day recreation of the crimes, and I liked the process, but that particular story didn't have what I thought were a lot of legs. I was a big fan of the writer Lawrence Block and the different series that he had. His Matthew Scudder series, which is pretty hardboiled, and then his Bernie Rhodenbarr burglar series which is more lighthearted and a little goofier, and I really liked that. I'd liked something in that mold and was looking for a hero. In The Ripperologists, there had been a dynamic of a crotchety old expert and a younger whippersnapper guy, and I liked that so I created Eli Marks, the magician who's in his thirties and his uncle Harry, who had essentially raised him who's in his eighties. Harry is a master magician. He has worked in all forms of professional stage magic, close up magic, kids' magic, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer John Gaspard.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.


Debbi: Hi everyone. Our guest today is the author of the Eli Marks mystery series. He also writes the Como Lake Players mystery series under the pen name Bobbie Raymond. Bobbie Raymond. I believe I have that right. In addition to three standalone novels, he has written several books about low budget filmmaking. Now that’s an interesting subject. Coming to us from Minnesota, my guest today is John Gaspard. Hi, John, did I pronounce that correctly?

John: You did. You pronounced it one of the two ways that is acceptable. My wife is more persistent about Ronnie Gaspard, but I’ve always had Gaspard so I answer to either one.

Debbi: Gaspard. Very French.

John: Yes. Oh yes. It’s like Smith in the phone book over there.

Debbi: All right. Okay. By the way, I love the short story that you provided for your guest post.

John: Great! Thank you.

Debbi: I just want to say that if you out there have not read it, any listeners have not read it, I would highly recommend you go to my blog and take a look at it. It’s fun and it even comes with an animated video, which I loved. it’s on my blog on my website and it’s a great way to sample John’s writing and Eli Marks. What prompted you to write this particular series about this kind of protagonist?

John: Well, boy, that’s a really good question. I had written a standalone suspense novel called The Ripperologists about people who are experts on Jack the Ripper who have to solve a current day recreation of the crimes, and I liked the process, but that particular story didn’t have what I thought were a lot of legs. I was a big fan of the writer Lawrence Block and the different series that he had. His Matthew Scudder series, which is pretty hardboiled, and then his Bernie Rhodenbarr burglar series which is more lighthearted and a little goofier, and I really liked that. I’d liked something in that mold and was looking for a hero. In The Ripperologists, there had been a dynamic of a crotchety old expert and a younger whippersnapper guy, and I liked that so I created Eli Marks, the magician who’s in his thirties and his uncle Harry, who had essentially raised him who’s in his eighties. Harry is a master magician. He has worked in all forms of professional stage magic, close up magic, kids’ magic, big illusions. You name it, Harry’s done it and his nephew, Eli is in his early thirties and is a working magician, making a living birthday parties and corporate events and trade shows and that sort of thing. Nowhere near as successful or knowledgeable as Harry was, but he always has Harry as a resource.

I fell into magicians because looking around I realized, because I was at the time in the meetings and events business in the corporate world, I knew more magicians than the average person knew and they were all pretty interesting. Very creative, very smart, a little quirky, and then I started investigating and found out the names of their tricks. Names that you might never hear cause a lot of times, a magician doesn’t say this is such and such a trick. They just do the trick, but the names themselves lent themselves to I thought pretty good mystery titles, like The Ambitious Card, The Bullet Catch, The Miser’s Dream, that sort of thing. So, I sat down and started to study and learn how to write like a magician. I’m not a magician, but I can write like one and I’m pretty good at making it sound like Eli knows what he’s talking about and Harry knows what they’re talking about.

I fell into magicians because looking around I realized, because I was at the time in the meetings and events business in the corporate world, I knew more magicians than the average person knew and they were all pretty interesting. Very creative, very smart, a little quirky, and then I started investigating and found out the names of their tricks.

Debbi: How did you get to know so many magicians?

John: Well, I booked several of them in the corporate world. When I was doing meetings and events for companies, you’d have to have after-dinner entertainment and magicians are always good for that sort of thing. And then a couple actor friends were also magicians and I had about a half dozen people I knew who were professional magicians, which is a lot more than the average person would have in their life who isn’t at all involved in magic, a whole lot more. I’m surprised if any of your listeners even know one professional magician personally. It just seemed like a really good, interesting field. There was a lot of history to it. There’s a lot of depth and because he’s a magician, Eli is in a lot of different environments. He runs a magic store with his uncle. He does corporate events. He does trade shows. He finds himself in a lot of different situations where murders or whatever happened, so he isn’t homebound or anything like Nero Wolfe or something. He is out in the world and is able to really do things and explore things, and that’s what I liked about the magician. It’s not a normal kind of a job cause every time they do something, they’re generally in a different environment.

Debbi: That’s great. It’s so esoteric. Did you do a lot of research to get to know the magician trade?

John: I did. I had to do a ton of research to get up to speed. I had to. I understood that I was like that old joke about the two guys who were being chased by the bear, and one guy says to the other one, we will never outrun that bear. And the other guy says, I don’t have to outrun the bear. I just have to outrun you. And that’s what it is with me and magic. I don’t know as much as a magician, but I know more than the average person and that’s really all I need to know, but it’s been a constant learning thing. I have to just keep learning stuff and filling the hopper for if Harry makes an offhand comment about a magician in the 20s, I need to know a magician in the 20s and I need to know something about him, so I did do a lot of reading. I went to some conventions. There was a really good podcast at the time called the Magic News Wire that had a lot of good interviews, and then I was very lucky that a world class magician happens to live about 10 minutes away from me. Her name is Suzanne. She’s performed all around the world. You can see her at the Magic Castle in Los Angeles a couple times a year, and she’s been doing it for 20 years and she really knows her stuff and she gives occasional lessons. And so, I took about a dozen lessons from her, ostensibly to learn how to do the trick that is the title trick in the first book, The Ambitious Card, which is a card trick where the card that the volunteer has chosen keeps being buried in the deck of cards and then pops to the top on its own magically.

I had to do a ton of research to get up to speed. I had to. I understood that I was like that old joke about the two guys who were being chased by the bear, and one guy says to the other one, we will never outrun that bear. And the other guy says, I don’t have to outrun the bear. I just have to outrun you. And that’s what it is with me and magic.

So not only did she teach me the moves to do that, but I also was able to learn what it’s like to be a full-time magician, cause that’s her job. What are her concerns? What keeps her up at night? What annoys her? What excites her? And so even though I was writing a male character, the job was the same, whether it’s male or female. I learned a lot from Suzanne and we’ve become good friends since then, and that really gave me the footing that I needed. But like I say, I still listen to magic podcasts. I still read books. I still get magazines. I still have to keep learning stuff in order to keep everything accurate, because although the average reader wouldn’t know whether I got something right or wrong, a magician reading it would and they would reach out I’m sure and let me know that I have described an effect wrong or have a slight wrong or something like that.
But just the opposite has happened. In fact, I was very fortunate a couple years ago, I got an email from Teller of Penn and Teller. He doesn’t speak, but he does write emails. He had read one of the books and he wrote me the nicest note, saying mostly mysteries that involve magicians get the magic wrong. You did not. Yours was accurate and true to life, and I really enjoyed that. So, I figure if one of the top five magicians in the world has read the books and said the magic is correct, then I’m doing the right kind of research.

Debbi: Oh, my God. That is the highest form of compliment right there. That is amazing!

John: I could have retired at that point. We’re not going to get any better than that.

Debbi: Yeah. Yeah. There are seven Eli Marks novels published so far. Correct?

John: There are seven. There’s an eighth one coming out after the first of the year.

Debbi: A-ha! I was going to ask about that. What’s the latest one about, and is there kind of like a plan for the series in terms of how many books and where you are going with it?

John: No, the word plan doesn’t even enter my mind or anything like that. No, I wasn’t even sure I was going to do one after the first one, but it’s sort of kept evolving and there was stuff for Eli to do. The series is fun in that you can really jump in anywhere cause they’re all free standing, but if you do start at the beginning, you see an evolution between Harry and his uncle, and Harry and his girlfriend, and the stuff that goes on in Harry’s life and in Eli’s life. in fact, one of the books, the sixth book, which is called The Zombie Ball is a flashback book, which takes place before all of them and sort of explains some tropes that have happened in all the books and why they’ve ended it up that way.

But for the eighth book, which is called The Self-Working Trick, it’s a collection of Eli Marks short stories. One of the things that is mentioned a lot in many of the books is that Eli has helped the police out on a number of cases in the past, but they sort of refer to them obliquely and I thought it might be kind of fun to see what some of those cases were. So, it’s a dozen stories that just show Eli at different stages in his life, being involved in either the murders or hostage situations or robberies, and just showing the things he knows how to do as a magician can sometimes help him solve crimes that the police can’t figure out.

Debbi: Interesting. Do you find it hard to come up with situations in which an amateur sleuth like a magician would have to deal with solving a murder?

John: Yes and no. It’s a Jessica Fletcher kind of situation. I did set it up that Eli’s ex-wife is the Assistant District Attorney and she’s now married to a detective in homicide, so there is sort of a connection why he keeps stumbling into things, and the fact that he has in the past helped them solve unsolvable crimes does make sense that they would come and ask him questions about particular cases. So yeah, the bigger problem I have is writing mysteries is hard as anyone who’s ever done it will tell you, particularly if you want to write a really fair mystery and I don’t mean fair in the sense of just barely good. I mean fair where you get to the end you go, oh, that is both surprising and inevitable. I know there are some people who can do it in their sleep. For me it’s really difficult. It’s hard to. I don’t have that kind of puzzle mind.

And so, putting those things together are the hardest parts of the books and what I wanted to do with The Self-Working Trick, book number eight was do the hard part a dozen times. Do 12 mysteries and not worry about an entire novel around them. These are 3,000-to-6,000-word short stories in which the key is the mystery and the key is solving it, just to give myself some more practice in getting out there and figuring out a mystery, as opposed to the normal novel, which takes me like a year and a half to do and it’s mostly spent trying to figure out I know who did it, but how is Eli going to figure it out and how is he going to be fair? I just sort of put that into hyperdrive and did it a dozen times for this book, just to try to get better at it.

Debbi: Wow. Well, that’s a really great approach, actually. A great writing tip right there, to work on short fiction.

John: Well, you’re supposed to do the stuff that scares you and so that’s what I did

Debbi: I’m with you there. Short stories are hard.

John: They are so hard and they make it … Debbi, people just think, oh, you just knock off a short story. It’s actually, I think, harder to write a good short story than to write a novel, because with a novel you’ve you got a lot of places to play and goof around and it’s like taking a very long road trip and you can stop wherever you want. A short story is a trip to the store and back, and it has got to be really tight, and unfortunately people have gotten in the habit of reading really, really great short stories where everything falls into place and it just makes them so hard to do, so it was a good challenge to put myself up for.

It’s actually, I think, harder to write a good short story than to write a novel, because with a novel you’ve you got a lot of places to play and goof around and it’s like taking a very long road trip and you can stop wherever you want. A short story is a trip to the store and back.

Debbi: Well, that’s cool. Also, you’ve written another series under a pseudonym. What inspired you to write that series and why use the pseudonym?

John: The simple answer is back when before I was self-publishing, I did have a traditional publisher and I was told repeatedly that one of the reasons they were having trouble with the Eli Marks books was because it was a male protagonist written by a male author and that most cozy mysteries are female protagonists written by a female author. So I thought I’d test that out and just see does it really make any difference and I don’t think it really does. I had an idea to do a series in a community theater because I’ve directed a bunch of community theater plays and have a better knowledge of that actually than of being a magician, and it lends itself to a series very nicely because although some of the main people at the theater stay the same, that cast and crew tends to change for every play so you have a asked every time. I thought it’d be sort of a challenge to try to write a female character. I made the choice to write it in third person because I really didn’t think I’d be very good at getting into her head. She’s the executive director of the theater, but from a third person point of view, I can represent her pretty well and it’s a fun milieu. I mean, plays are fun and they can be dark and mysterious. You got a lot of crazy characters. It’s a fun place to play.

Debbi: Kind of a nice collaborative sort of setting too, in terms of having a lot of different characters, I assume?

John: Yes, it is so nice. For all those writers out there who are writing mysteries and who get halfway through their book and realize that they’ve killed off all their suspects—which I have done—and you have to go back and add more people. if you’ve got the cast of A Christmas Carol, which is what the third book will be about, I’ve got a dozen people there. Got a lot of great suspects, a lot of people to kill and it just makes it so much easier. The second book was all about The Importance of Being Earnest, which is a cast of, I think, six or eight. Just ideal, and they were all people who weren’t in the first book, so any one of them could have been the killer, cause once you’ve established a character in a book, moving from book to book, the odds of them being the killer in the second book are kind of slim so you need a bunch of new faces, and having a new play each book has been really helpful.

Debbi: That’s brilliant, actually. That’s great. How did you get involved in low-budget filmmaking?

John: I’ve been doing that forever since about age 13. I was given a wind-up movie camera by an uncle who was done using it and started doing shorts and then was lucky enough while in high school, there was a film program here in the Twin Cities, Minneapolis-St. Paul High School film program, where you do your normal schoolwork in the morning and then go off to a film program in the afternoon. So, I did that for three years and made a couple features in Super 8, which is kind of at the time. Even now it is pretty unheard of to do a 90-minute feature on a really wonky technology. And then I just kept doing it. In college, I took some film courses and had access to a lot of video equipment. Made some features there and then got out of college and a friend approached me and said he had a script that he’d written and he had $30,000 and he wanted to shoot it. Would I direct it? And I said, yes, I will direct your movie if you produce one with me afterwards. So, we did two features on 16-millimeter, each costing about $30,000. The first one, I don’t think it’s made any money back. The second one is maybe almost made money back.
Then filmmaking kind of broke open when the digital realm came and cameras were cheap and you didn’t have to pay for film. Everything was digital—zeros and ones—so you could shoot a lot. I made three features and a short that way. It’s very collaborative. It’s really fun. It’s exhausting and not for the faint of heart or the young, or I mean the old. As I’ve gotten older, it’s just a harder thing to do cause there’s a lot of gear. If you’ve spent a year writing a novel, imagine doing the same thing, but you have to organize a dozen or 20 people every time you want to work on the next part of it, you get a sense of just what a huge task it is. But the upside is that I learned a whole lot about storytelling and how to start a scene and how to end a scene and how to bury exposition and introduce characters, and all that, which comes in very handy in novel writing.

Debbi: Very much so. I do screenwriting and have taken a course on indie producing and it just opened my eyes to just how complex and amazing the filmmaking process is.

John: They make it look easy. Having done corporate events and done video production in the corporate side for 30 years, the average person looking at a video would go, oh, well, you just shot that, right? No, even today with equipment making things much easier, you still are setting up sound and setting up lights and doing different takes, different angles. It isn’t as simple as it looks.

Debbi: That’s right. Yeah. And there’s so much. There’s a whole team involved in making a movie. That’s the thing.

John: Yeah.

Debbi: It depends on your budget too. I mean, sometimes people can do more even one thing. Sometimes they do all of it and it’s really amazing what gets done.

John: You know, having done the last couple digital features I did, we did one of those actually shot in the theater that is the basis for the Bobbie Raymond series, which is a little community theater in Minneapolis. I worked with a screenwriter and we looked at the building and went there. There are 42 different rooms in this building. There’s a lot of spaces in this building. This building is used Friday, Saturday night, Sunday afternoon. It’s empty the rest of the time, except the rehearsal hall. Everything else is empty for the rest of the week. What a great place to make a movie. And so, we wrote the movie to fit that space and those rooms. And for that, I was co-screenwriter and I was the director and I was also the cinematographer, and that’s a lot of jobs for one person to take on. I was lucky to have a couple crew people who would help with the lights and one guy who did the sound, but even then, it was a crew of maybe four people. It certainly can be done. It just is pretty exhausting.

Debbi: And then there’s pre-production, there’s postproduction. People really just don’t appreciate how much goes into it.

John: No, they don’t. They don’t, and that’s why I wrote a couple books on film production, just because after we did our two 16-millimeter features, my producing partner and I, we learned a lot of stuff in the first one, and then we forgot about half of it and had to relearn it on the second one and we kept reinventing the wheel. And so, I did one book on just general production and one on screenwriting, as much for myself as for anyone else, just to remind myself here’s a smart way to do things. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel every time. Someone else has already solved this problem for you.

Debbi: Yeah, I’ll definitely have to check out your books on filmmaking. Definitely. What do you like to read and what authors inspire you?

John: Well, I mentioned Lawrence Block with his Matthew Scudder books and his Bernie Rhodenbarr and his Keller, the very charming Hitman series. He makes it look easy, particularly in his short stories. He really makes it look easy, and so I learned a lot from reading him. When I started the series, I went back and reread a bunch of Agatha Christies, as much to see what I didn’t want to do as what I did want to do, to see how she buried things and hid things and set up things, and I wasn’t always happy with her solutions, particularly having directed a couple of her plays where you just go, that makes no sense at all. Ma’am, that makes no sense at all that you can do that. But anyway, I learned a lot from that. As for actual casual reading, since I started in the series, I am spending so much time reading about magic that I don’t have as much time for that sort of pleasure reading as I would like. Not that my reading about magic isn’t pleasurable, some of it really, really is cause there’s a lot of very smart people coming up with very clever ideas. but yeah, it was Lawrence Block that really inspired me at the beginning.

Debbi: Well, that’s cool cause he’s a great writer. I love his work.

John: He is a fantastic writer.

Debbi: What advice would you give to someone starting out as a writer?

John: Well, it’s same advice I give to people starting out making movies, which is you have to decide early on if this needs to be a money-making operation or not. I learned that a lot in filmmaking, that toward the end there with digital filmmaking, you can do it so cheaply. I mean, for example, when we did our 16-millimeter features I mentioned, they cost $30,000 each, which may not seem like a lot in Hollywood terms, but that’s a lot in human terms, regular people. And that went primarily for the gear and the film stock and processing the film stock and all that. Nowadays with the digital system set up the way they are and the digital recording for audio and the low budget editing gear, one of the last features I did, the one we did in the theater, which was called Ghost Light, the cost really, cause I already owned the camera and the lights, the costs were making sure that there was lunch every Saturday for the crew and I actually spent more money entering the film into film festivals than I did making the film, cause each film festival cost like 50 to 80 bucks to enter it. You can rack that up pretty quickly. So my advice is with writing or with filmmaking, decide early on if you want economics to be a part of this or not. If you want economics to be a part of it, then you’ve got to create with that in mind. What do people want to read? How am I going to get it to them? How will I get money out of it? If you don’t care about the economics and you just want to have an enjoyable time doing it, but still would like people to read stuff, it makes it a whole lot easier because as with filmmaking, getting a book out there now is really cheap.

So my advice is with writing or with filmmaking, decide early on if you want economics to be a part of this or not. If you want economics to be a part of it, then you’ve got to create with that in mind.

You obviously need a computer probably to write it on. It would be helpful if you had Vellum or something like that to format it. You need to buy a really good cover from a really good graphic artist—don’t make your own—and have a good editor go through it. But if you’re spending more than a thousand dollars, you don’t have to is what I’m saying. And if that’s all it costs, then you don’t need to make more than a thousand dollars if you don’t care about making money. The problem is as with anything else, it becomes a competition and you start reading about what other people are doing. And it’s like, oh, this person is selling this amount of books per day and why am I not doing that? Well, I’m not doing that because I don’t care to do that. I love it when someone buys. I’ll look online and say, oh look! Somebody clearly bought all seven books in the Eli Marks series today. Someone went cause all seven of them all sold at the same time, so clearly someone bought all of them. That’s fantastic. I’m very happy about that. But I don’t think I’ve ever looked at ranking on Amazon, except once when I had a free thing on BookBub and whatever I was giving away for free surpassed Louise Penny, which I thought was kind of funny. It’s like, oh wow. For 30 seconds, this book was above Louise Penny. It’s really hard in this competitive world to not want to do that, but if you can just get that out of the way, it can be a really fun thing to do.
Of course, there are people who need to make money at it and that’s a whole different thing, a whole different track. So, you just need to decide early on which track are you on, and that’ll make the whole process a lot more fun if you kind of know ahead of time which track you need to be on.

The problem is as with anything else, it becomes a competition and you start reading about what other people are doing. And it’s like, oh, this person is selling this amount of books per day and why am I not doing that? Well, I’m not doing that because I don’t care to do that.

Debbi: I completely agree with you. I think that’s an extremely healthy attitude you have of not checking your rank all the time, that sort of thing. I mean, it’s ridiculous.

John: It is, but it’s also quite hard to not fall into it, particularly because as an independent publisher, which is what I am. Just like I’m listening to magic podcasts and reading up on stuff, I’m also following writing podcasts such as yours, and you can get into this, Oh my goodness. I need to have a huge backlist. The thing that just floored me when I first heard about it was, oh no, I need to rapidly release three books and I need to be writing four books a year. And I thought, wow. If I tried to write four books a year, I would be dead and I wouldn’t enjoy it. And having spent 30-some years in the corporate world where I had to sit down and write something, I had to churn it out, whatever it was that we were doing, I had to do it. This is a case where I don’t have to do it and so I don’t have to do a certain amount of writing every day. I don’t have to put out a number of books every year. I realize and I hear from Eli Marks fans, they always love having a new book and I always love sending them a new book, but I didn’t sign up for being the guy who has to give them a brand new book every year. That’s just not what I signed up for.

If I tried to write four books a year, I would be dead and I wouldn’t enjoy it. And having spent 30-some years in the corporate world where I had to sit down and write something, I had to churn it out, whatever it was that we were doing, I had to do it.

Debbi: Well, to me, that’s a very healthy attitude. I’m glad to hear it because …

John: But it’s hard to keep that when …

Debbi: Comparisonitis is something I try to avoid.

John: When you hear someone else talk and you hear about… I was just listening to the—and I probably shouldn’t cause it’s not helping really, I suppose but—the Six Figure Author podcast. They’re very nice people and they have very good advice on there, but they’re talking about the amount of money you’re supposed to spend every day on advertising. One person was talking about spending a thousand dollars a day on advertising. I thought I’m not doing that. There’s no way I’m doing that.

Debbi: That’s insane.

John: It is insane and you go, well, you’d make a million a year. Yeah, I’d also not be able to sleep at night. So, I would rather keep doing what I’m doing and I know there are people who are far better at doing what I’m doing than I am. I’ve learned a lot and I’ve made mistakes, but the fact is that every day I sell a handful of books and that’s fantastic.

Debbi: Is there anything else you’d like to say before we finish up?

John: Thanks for having me on. I enjoy the podcast. Yeah, this has been fun.

Debbi: Well, I’ve had fun and I just love what you have to say. I think that’s fantastic.

John: Have you been using the screenwriting stuff you learned to help just in your normal writing?

Debbi: Definitely. Screenwriting has helped me with my usual writing. I mean, my novel writing. It’s given me also a great deal of appreciation for IP in general. The whole concept of intellectual property and the importance of copyright, all that kind of thing.

John: I wish more people would just look into screenwriting just because it teaches you so many great things. You don’t really even need to be reading books on it. Just kind of pay attention as you’re watching a movie. At what point do they get into the scene? At what point do they leave the scene? I was talking to someone recently who said, oh boy, screenplay writing must be fun cause you get to write more dialogue than you’d have in a novel. And I said, well, it’s actually just the opposite. There’s probably 1/10 the amount of dialogue in a movie than there is in a novel. You don’t have time in a movie for the kind of talking you can do in a novel. And he said, no, are you sure? I said, yeah. I mean, a screenplay is 120 pages and just look at the amount of words in it compared to a novel, and you learn from writing screenplays how to compress and say less and do less and make each line have more impact.

I wish more people would just look into screenwriting just because it teaches you so many great things. You don’t really even need to be reading books on it. Just kind of pay attention as you’re watching a movie. At what point do they get into the scene? At what point do they leave the scene?

You mentioned the short story, “The Last Customer” that I’m giving away via your blog. And that’s a 5,000, 6,000-word short story, maybe something like that, and I turned it into an animated piece as you can see from the link. Originally that started because I wanted to do it as a comic book, which means figuring out all the frames and what’s going to be said in each one, and that is an active compression that anybody who’s writing a short story should try to do. To take a 6,000-word short story and compress down just the dialogue cause everything else has to be visualized by your artist. I’d be surprised if 15% of the dialogue made it into the comic book. I had to really, really, really compress it because there just isn’t the time or the space, and it helps you be a better writer cause you figure out exactly what needs to be said and what doesn’t.

Debbi: Absolutely. I couldn’t agree with you more. That is so true. And yeah, people do have that misimpression about screenwriting. It’s not about dialogue. The less dialogue, the better.

John: It isn’t. And because of being in lockdown, my wife and I ended up watching a lot more mystery series from around the world. Netflix has a lot of really good ones. And you can learn from watching those how to bury things in a mystery, how to bury clues, because it’s very hard to really bury a clue in a miniseries or particularly in a movie, if you have 90 minutes. If someone is sharpening a knife in the beginning of the movie, you know that knife is going to turn up as an element later on in the movie. You can bury stuff a whole lot easier in a novel, because you can have so many different kind of red herring things out there. In a movie as you’re watching it, once you’ve written a few mystery novels, and I’m sure you do the same thing, you see those red flags as they pop up and you go, oh yeah. Okay. No, it’s the sister. Obviously, it’s the sister because she just said that thing, and you realize the luxury you have in writing a novel of being able to bury stuff a whole lot easier.

Debbi: Absolutely. Definitely. Well, I want to thank you for being here, John. Thanks.

John: Oh, thank you, Debbi. It’s been fun.

Debbi: I had a great time talking to you and remember everyone who’s listening, that the Crime Café has two eBooks featuring multiple authors who have appeared on the show. You can buy them from all major retailers. You can also get a copy of each if you become a Patreon supporter, so check out the Patreon page. All you have to do is click on the Patreon button at the bottom of this podcast and check it out. Our next guest on the show will be David Kushner. In the meantime, take care and happy reading.

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Debbi Mack interviews crime writer John Gaspard. - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBo... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer John Gaspard.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. Our guest today is the author of the Eli Marks mystery series. He also writes the Como Lake Players mystery series under the pen name Bobbie Raymond. Bobbie Raymond. I believe I have that right. In addition to three standalone novels, he has written several books about low budget filmmaking. Now that's an interesting subject. Coming to us from Minnesota, my guest today is John Gaspard. Hi, John, did I pronounce that correctly?<br /> <br /> John: You did. You pronounced it one of the two ways that is acceptable. My wife is more persistent about Ronnie Gaspard, but I've always had Gaspard so I answer to either one.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Gaspard. Very French.<br /> <br /> John: Yes. Oh yes. It's like Smith in the phone book over there.<br /> <br /> Debbi: All right. Okay. By the way, I love the short story that you provided for your guest post.<br /> <br /> John: Great! Thank you.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I just want to say that if you out there have not read it, any listeners have not read it, I would highly recommend you go to my blog and take a look at it. It's fun and it even comes with an animated video, which I loved. it's on my blog on my website and it's a great way to sample John's writing and Eli Marks. What prompted you to write this particular series about this kind of protagonist?<br /> <br /> John: Well, boy, that's a really good question. I had written a standalone suspense novel called The Ripperologists about people who are experts on Jack the Ripper who have to solve a current day recreation of the crimes, and I liked the process, but that particular story didn't have what I thought were a lot of legs. I was a big fan of the writer Lawrence Block and the different series that he had. His Matthew Scudder series, which is pretty hardboiled, and then his Bernie Rhodenbarr burglar series which is more lighthearted and a little goofier, and I really liked that. I'd liked something in that mold and was looking for a hero. In The Ripperologists, there had been a dynamic of a crotchety old expert and a younger whippersnapper guy, and I liked that so I created Eli Marks, the magician who's in his thirties and his uncle Harry, Debbi Mack 36:35
Interview with Crime Writer Iain Parke: S. 7, Ep. 11 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-iain-parke-s-7-ep-11/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-iain-parke-s-7-ep-11 Sun, 21 Nov 2021 05:05:29 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22398 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Iain Parke. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi, everyone. Before I introduce my guest, I’ll just mention that my latest novel, Fatal Connections is out now. It’s the second Erica Jensen mystery. And since Erica is a female marine veteran, Veterans Day seemed like a good day to have it released. So, if you like hard-boiled mystery, please check it out. Yes, it’s at all the usual retailers, so do check it out, including Amazon, of course. But with me today is a guy who writes about motorcycle clubs, or as it’s described on his website, Biker Noir. I like that description. You should totally check out his writing sample on his website. It’s really awesome. And with me today then is Iain Parke. Hi, Iain. How are you doing? Iain Parke: Hi, very well. Thank you. Greetings from across the pond on a fairly grotty November night. Debbi: It’s kind of grotty around here. It’s not nice, but it’s been raining. Actually, it was kind of nice. It’s cleared up and well, we kind of went from rain to cleared up. So, it was not so bad, really when it comes down to it. [crosstalk] Iain: Yeah, you can tell you’re talking to someone from England because we’re on to the weather already. I mean that’s all we talk about. Debbi: That’s all we talk about in Maryland too, that’s interesting. Very, very interesting. I got to tell you though, I noticed you have an MBA and an interesting background, insolvency and business restructuring. So, the fact that you kind of drew on that experience to write a conspiracy thriller as a novel seem to suggest something dire. Iain: Yeah. I did an MBA and was interested in running businesses, and set out effectively to have a career in running businesses and doing just things in this sort of distressed business space. And I won’t bore you with the career history, but essentially at one point I ended up, I wanted to get a secondment. I was working for PwC, one of the big firms at the time and I wanted to secondment to Canada and I ended up in Tanzania, which just proves my geography is fairly lousy. So, from going to the west coast of Canada to going to East Africa, I ended up sort of running a match factory with about a thousand employees, including 300 ladies putting matches into boxes by hand on the slopes of Kilimanjaro for a year. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Iain Parke.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.

Debbi: Hi, everyone. Before I introduce my guest, I’ll just mention that my latest novel, Fatal Connections is out now. It’s the second Erica Jensen mystery. And since Erica is a female marine veteran, Veterans Day seemed like a good day to have it released. So, if you like hard-boiled mystery, please check it out. Yes, it’s at all the usual retailers, so do check it out, including Amazon, of course. But with me today is a guy who writes about motorcycle clubs, or as it’s described on his website, Biker Noir. I like that description. You should totally check out his writing sample on his website. It’s really awesome. And with me today then is Iain Parke. Hi, Iain. How are you doing?

Iain Parke: Hi, very well. Thank you. Greetings from across the pond on a fairly grotty November night.

Debbi: It’s kind of grotty around here. It’s not nice, but it’s been raining. Actually, it was kind of nice. It’s cleared up and well, we kind of went from rain to cleared up. So, it was not so bad, really when it comes down to it. [crosstalk]

Iain: Yeah, you can tell you’re talking to someone from England because we’re on to the weather already. I mean that’s all we talk about.

Debbi: That’s all we talk about in Maryland too, that’s interesting. Very, very interesting. I got to tell you though, I noticed you have an MBA and an interesting background, insolvency and business restructuring. So, the fact that you kind of drew on that experience to write a conspiracy thriller as a novel seem to suggest something dire.

Iain: Yeah. I did an MBA and was interested in running businesses, and set out effectively to have a career in running businesses and doing just things in this sort of distressed business space. And I won’t bore you with the career history, but essentially at one point I ended up, I wanted to get a secondment. I was working for PwC, one of the big firms at the time and I wanted to secondment to Canada and I ended up in Tanzania, which just proves my geography is fairly lousy. So, from going to the west coast of Canada to going to East Africa, I ended up sort of running a match factory with about a thousand employees, including 300 ladies putting matches into boxes by hand on the slopes of Kilimanjaro for a year.

And I spent two and a half years out there, doing all sorts of weird and wonderful things, really. And it was a very interesting fish out of water experience; all the sort of cultural shock that you get by going to a very different culture. And I started writing something. I spent a very drunken evening, very drunken New Year’s Day, visiting a friend who had a heart attack on Kilimanjaro, who was working with the local farmers. And during the day I read before we got very drunk on New Year’s Eve, I read John le Carré, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. And the next day with a thumping hangover I read an Iain Banks novel. And I remember sitting there thinking, the le Carré, I was fascinated by how he’d got that atmosphere, the sort of bureaucracy and that.

And then the Iain Banks novel, I was just fascinated by how he’d managed to get such a complicated plot to then all worked through. And I remember, I literally remember sitting there thinking, “Oh, that’s really interesting. Could I do that?” And then I started writing something. And to be honest, to start with, it was really just therapy about being this fish out of water somewhere in East Africa doing all these odd things. And it turned into a sort of political conspiracy novel called The Liquidator. And if anybody’s going on a safari holiday, I just recommend not taking it because you don’t want to be caught with it at customs, guys. But it was just a fascinating thing to do. And I really wrote it for me as a getting something out of my system, almost. And I wrote this thing, and it was 180,000 words long, and it was far too long.

And I came back home and it went in a drawer and I forgot about it for 10 years. Until I was at one stage, I left the company and I had a two-three months of garden leave period where I wasn’t supposed to be working or anything else. So, I took this out of the drawer, I thought well actually, I really ought to finish this. And I sort of rewrote it about two or three times from different viewpoints. And I sent it — I had the great fortune of sending it to my brother. If you are a writer, what you need is somebody rude. I sent it to my brother who was at the time a sub editor on a local newspaper. And I sent in the first three chapters and said, “What do you think of this?”

And about two weeks later came this envelope, and he put a big red line through all of chapter one, and just written ‘please’ on it. And it was just like, take out all this self-indulgent stuff. And eventually it slimmed down, and it ended up being sort of 100,000 words out of 180. And I thought, right, I’m going to — I couldn’t find an agent or anybody who’s interested. So, I decided to self-publish it.

And I thought, right, I’ve got that out of my system. I’ve done it. And I thought, okay, so I’ve done that and I’ve really enjoyed writing it. And I have another career in writing business books to do with the NBA and restructuring, etc. And I’m a sort of published author through traditional means on that. And I just, I’d got into the habit of writing by that stage, so I sat down, what else am I interested in writing about? And I’m a lifelong biker. And I’ve always been interested in sort of the far edge of that scene, if you like. And I was really irritated by the fact that the way bikers tend to be presented in the media tends to be sort of fairly Neanderthal.

I’m a lifelong biker. And I’ve always been interested in sort of the far edge of that scene, if you like. And I was really irritated by the fact that the way bikers tend to be presented in the media tends to be sort of fairly Neanderthal.

You know, you come across them as comedy villains in Clint Eastwood films, etc. And I thought, actually this is — Whatever you think about it, it’s a very serious lifestyle, and people commit to it very seriously and take it very seriously, and deserve to be treated seriously. And so why is no — And actually, to me, it was a fascinating area of life. And I thought why is nobody writing fiction set in that — there’s loads of fiction about the Mafia, and other sort of areas of crime. But why is nobody writing anything about that? And I thought, well, if nobody else is doing it, and there’s this thing about, write what you’d be interested in reading. So, I thought, well, I’ll write about it.

So, I started to write a book, which was about a character called Damage and how he got involved in the sort of biker scene and the choices that led him to make and how that worked out. And it was really just supposed to be a one off story. And I finished that and published it and it started doing quite well. And I had no intention of doing anything more in that scene. I thought I’d go on to do other things. I had loads of other other projects I wanted to do. And then about three or four months after I published it, two of the characters met up in my head for a meeting. And they were off. Yeah, they just started and I was just along for the ride, essentially.

Debbi: For the ride, how appropriate.

Iain: They completely took on and so they started this thing that led to a second book. And I remember talking to somebody who done reviews of the first one. I said, oh by the way, I’ve done a follow up. And they said how the hell have you done that on the basis that you’ve killed off most of the — So, my tip for writing a successful series, don’t kill off all your characters in book one because that’s a fundamental mistake. [crosstalk] Yeah. So, I wrote a second and then I wrote a third and that seemed to finish off a trilogy.

And then that’s turned into another three books which are not, which are other books set within the same world and within the same characters. So, they’re sort of extensions, they cross different aspects. And they become sort of a cult. I have to say that very carefully. But I’ve been referred to as a sort of cult author, which is quite flattering, I have to say. And the first trilogy got picked up to be developed for TV, hasn’t actually been made. So, I’ve been through a whole load of development hell, so I can talk for hours about the TV process for anybody who wants to listen. [crosstalk] No, it’s been a fun ride, I’d have to say so far.

Debbi: Yeah. Yeah, I could definitely talk to you about that, because I know a little bit about that myself. Damage is — [crosstalk]

Iain: It’s a very painful process, isn’t it?

Debbi: Oh, it is, isn’t it? And it’s a very long and complicated process that I don’t think people really appreciate or know about that much. But I do like the name Damage. It just seems to kind of encapsulate a type of character. How did you create this character? Did you draw from experience with particular people?

Iain: Well, a confession time in that Damage was one of my nicknames as a kid. So, I use that. A lot of the names I used in the first book, I mean, there’s a lot of in jokes, essentially, in the first book. And a lot of the names are people that I knew around the biker scene when I was in my teens, 20s, early 30s. And Damage was one of the nicknames that I was given for various reasons. And where it came from, there’s — So, I’ve never been in that type of club. I’ve never been associated to that type of club, I’m just not in that scene. But I knew people who were sort of around it, type thing, and ran across people in that sort of club and have had odd conversations with people. So, I knew — you sort of got a feel for it, if you like.

So, I’ve never been in that type of club. I’ve never been associated to that type of club, I’m just not in that scene. But I knew people who were sort of around it, type thing, and ran across people in that sort of club and have had odd conversations with people. So, I knew — you sort of got a feel for it, if you like.

And being around the sort of the biker scene, there would be events and things you’d go to, and you’d see things that sort of percolated into what’s in a number of the books. So, quite a lot of the books have got things in them, or vignettes, which are real because they are things I saw or friends of mine were involved with that sort of try and anchor it in reality, if you like. And I also somebody — I say I’ve always been fascinated in the area ever since I read Hunter S. Thompson’s book, Hell’s Angels. I’ve always read anything I could find or that came out about it. And so I’ve built up a library of books over the years.

And actually, since I first started writing, there have been a lot more come out. Because a lot of guys who were of an age, if you like, are starting to sort of retire if you like and tell their memoirs. So, there was quite a stage where there wasn’t very much written. So, your research was narrowed to quite a few limited number of books. But the volume of sort of memoirs, and people’s life stories that have been coming out over the past five, six years is at a mushroom, so it’s a bit difficult to keep on top of to be honest.

I say I’ve always been fascinated in the area ever since I read Hunter S. Thompson’s book, Hell’s Angels. I’ve always read anything I could find or that came out about it. And so I’ve built up a library of books over the years.

But what I tried to do was get a — I tried to generate something that felt right, that felt like the way that a group of guys would operate and feel and the sort of way they would interact and the sort of rituals and processes that they will put in place. And I mean, I’ve had some feedback from people in the scene who have gone, you know, nothing like [inaudible 00:14:12]. But I’ve also had quite a bit of feedback that yes, it feels right. It respects the sort of the feel of it and feels authentic. And I can’t really ask for more than that, to be honest. But when somebody comes back and says yes, that feels a sort of authentic feel to it, you know, that’s brilliant. That’s my job done, tick. Thank you very much. I’ve achieved what I wanted to achieve.

I tried to generate something that felt right, that felt like the way that a group of guys would operate and feel and the sort of way they would interact and the sort of rituals and processes that they will put in place.

Debbi: Yes, absolutely. I mean, it’s fiction, but at the same time, you want it to feel real. And to do that you got to capture those authentic details. You have to capture the facts as well as create the fiction, right?

Iain: I had a one star review at one stage and I can’t remember which book it was on now. But I had a one star review. And it’s my favorite ever review. Well, no, not my favorite review, but I really like it. Because essentially, it was: I got halfway through this book, before I realized it was fiction. And you know, damn authors, making stuff up. It’s not right. Is it, really? And I thought, yes, thank you very much. I’ll take that. I’ll take that one star review.

Debbi: Yeah, absolutely. That is unique. What is the worst example you can think of the way bikers are misrepresented, and say the best example of the way they are correctly represented?

Iain: The worst? Oh. How long have you got?

Debbi: Something that—

Iain: The thing that really bugged me, I suppose and is the one I keep coming back to is the sort of lazy comedy villain type thing. And the example I would point to really is the Clint Eastwood, Any Which Way But Loose films, where you have a biker club called the Black Widows who are the sort of the bumbling evil incarnate type thing, but, you know, and just keep — If their bikes don’t fall over, in the next 30 seconds something’s gone wrong with the scene to be honest. And that just irritates me because I know a lot of bikers and they are bright guys. And it’s a sort of trope. I mean, it gets through into — It pops up in the Sopranos at one point. And I’ve got a lot of time for the Sopranos as a TV series. But you know, they ran, Tony and Christopher ran across a biker group called the Vipers and basically steal their booze. And it’s a big haha type moment, but it just just irritates me.

The thing that really bugged me, I suppose and is the one I keep coming back to is the sort of lazy comedy villain type thing.

In terms of good represent or presentations of bikers, you might need to leave that with me to have a bit of a think because I struggle a bit to be honest. There are some — I have to say, there are some good documentaries. From back in the 70s, certainly in the UK, on the biker scene, where some journalists took the time to actually get to know and present the guy’s lifestyle in a sort of sensible and sort of non-judgmental way. It didn’t make it look particularly attractive, but it was, at least it seemed to be honest, as an approach type thing. Honesty, I suppose, is all I’m really asking for. It’s not much to ask really.

I have to say, there are some good documentaries. From back in the 70s, certainly in the UK, on the biker scene, where some journalists took the time to actually get to know and present the guy’s lifestyle in a sort of sensible and sort of non-judgmental way.

Debbi: That’s pretty cool. That’s great. Those documentaries, do they go into things like mods and rockers?

Iain: Those particular ones don’t because they were so focused on the clubs. The mod and rocker scene in the UK was a sort of an earlier phenomenon in the early 60s. And actually, I use it in one of the books that isn’t part of the first trilogy, in that I have a plot which involves a guy going to look for somebody who’s disappeared. And the guy who’s disappeared is one of the sort of founding fathers of a club and has a history going back into the mods and rockers period. So, I use that as a way to get in and explore mods and rockers. And one of the things about the mods and rockers, period and how it’s presented is quite, I find it’s quite, again, it’s about myths and tropes. So, the myth is, you have a group called the mods on their scooters, and they all star in a Quadrophenia film and they go down to Brighton. And then there’s a completely separate mob called the rockers who just appear and they have a big punch up and go away again.

So, the myth is, you have a group called the mods on their scooters, and they all star in a Quadrophenia film and they go down to Brighton. And then there’s a completely separate mob called the rockers who just appear and they have a big punch up and go away again.

The reality, if you sort of dive into it is there wasn’t actually that much of that sort of big punch ups, really. And I don’t know about your school days, but when I was at school, and I was in the punk era, in my class, there were some punks. There were some guys who were getting into the early stage of heavy metal. They were the disco kids, they were the New Romantics. We were all in the same class. We all knew each other. We all went to the same parties more or less and we all went — would go to different things. So, it’s not like there was some completely separate tribe of mods and some completely separate private rockers and they never knew each other. You know? They were just all parts of the same milieu. You’d have kids who are mods and kids who were rockers who would know each other, be at school together, etc.

And that whole, just there are two tribes and they’re completely divided, never the twain shall meet, I think is rubbish, frankly. They did meet, they did have relationships, they did know each other. They’d have girlfriends who would swap between one tribe and other boyfriends who’d swap, it’s a more complicated nuanced picture, then mods-rockers fight allows for. And that’s part of what interests me in all of this. It’s the nuances of why people are really doing things and what their relationships are and what their choices are, and how it interacts with their life and kids and family. And people aren’t tropes, they are people, and they’re much more complicated. And that’s what makes them interesting. [crosstalk] Which is a bit of a load to put on a bike, book about bikers.

Debbi: Do you think Hunter Thompson’s book kind of opened the door for all this? Or was there a book before this that did that?

Iain: I think Hunter S. Thompson’s book is the sort of ground zero I think about writing about this subject. There were other people doing bits and pieces of writing about it at the time. So, Tom Wolfe has written bits that pop up in that and his writing about Ken Kesey and that sort of thing. There have been photo books and articles etc. So, Thompson wasn’t alone in writing about the scene. But he created I think, what is the erstone of all the writing that was followed.

But interestingly, there’s a book by George Worthen, who was a sort of contemporary Hell’s Angel at the time. And it sort of reads like the companion — if you read it, it’s sort of the companion piece. So, it’s almost like what was happening when Hunter S. Thompson wasn’t around. So, this Hunter S. Thompson tells you this bit, and then in the background, you’ve got this stuff sort of going on, etc. So, it makes quite an interesting sort of compare and contrast read if you like. But yeah, so, Hunter, if you’re reading anything on this scene, you need to start with Hunter S. Thompson, because everything else will refer to it or back from it.

Debbi: I read the Hunter Thompson’s book on this a long time ago, I got to tell you, and I always thought it was just an amazing book. I was just amazed at what he had done, and how things ended up.

Iain: Yeah. But what you then get into is the degree to which there is then debate about how much of it is reality and how much of it is fiction.

Debbi: Very good question in Hunter Thompson’s case.

Iain: Or fictionalized if you like. So, an opinion is divided, let’s put it that way.

Debbi: Well, he was quite a writer. He was quite a — I don’t know how can I save this nicely — creative fiction or creative nonfiction writer? Let’s put it that way.

Iain: Oh, yes, having read the Hell’s Angels book I mean, I went on to read everything else that was available from him at a time, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail. I never managed, really, to get into The Rum Diaries. That was a step too far, I think. But [crosstalk] his fear and loathing stuff was brilliant.

Debbi: Absolutely. I can’t agree with you more. Definitely. Let’s see. What writers inspire you most? What do you like to read? Apart from the biker books.

Iain: Yeah. Well, what riders inspire me and what books I want to read are probably two slightly different things, I suppose. One of the things that inspired me to write Heavy Duty People in the first book was Machiavelli, The Prince. And actually, there’s quite, again, there’s quite an in-joke running through Heavy Duty People in relation to The Prince. If you read the two side by side, there’s some parallels that you’ll see. I’m interested — I read for pleasure. And I also read to understand. So, and by understand I mean to find out things and also to understand how other people write. So, I will read stuff, I will read stuff that I don’t particularly want to read, but just to see how it’s constructed, how the author makes things work.

One of the things that inspired me to write Heavy Duty People in the first book was Machiavelli, The Prince. And actually, there’s quite, again, there’s quite an in-joke running through Heavy Duty People in relation to The Prince.

But I mean, my leisure reading, I suppose, tends to be either fairly heavyweight histories. And if I’m reading fiction, I’ll read things like James Ellroy, I’ll read Robert Harris, again, who I read regularly in terms of how do you do something that works that well? Ian Rankin, to an extent. So, I’m fairly mainstream, I suppose in my reading tastes, in terms of fiction, and then I say quite a lot of fairly heavy history. Again, because I’m interested in people and in how they, how they work, and what they do. And there’s little foibles that come out. Dot, dot, dot.

Debbi: Yeah, yeah, exactly. What are you working on now?

Iain: Well, having done six of these biker books, I have a seventh that I’ve probably been working on for about three, if not four years, and never quite getting to finish. And I’m not sure why. Partly, it’s because I think effectively it would tie up the whole of the series and bring a lot of loose ends together. And I’ve tried writing it about three or four times and keep getting to a point where it sort of breaks down, right, I keep trying to address that. But what I’m doing at the moment is I’ve also started a publishing company.

So, in addition to me writing, I suppose, I’m slightly being distracted by working with other authors and what they are putting out. I mean, I did write another book after the biker series, which was a little sort of conspiracy theory, all about how the British bombed Pearl Harbor in 1940. Or arranged the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. So, if you want to know how that worked, [crosstalk] I’m not going to tell you.

Debbi: Oh, my God.

Iain: Well, again, it was inspired by reading odd bits of history and coming across various little tropes. And you sort of stuck three or four things together and thought, oh, actually, you know that, that makes a sort of logical sense. So, building on about three or four real historical facts I get from where we are now to, yes, the British actually organizing the bombing of Pearl Harbor in order to bring America into the war and save us, which sort of makes a logical sense.

Debbi: It does actually. Isn’t this awesome?

Iain: Yes, so that one’s called best — if anybody wants to read, read that and find their understanding of history turned upside down, that’s called Best of Enemies. So, I’m expecting to create a diplomatic incident between our countries.

Debbi: Well, let’s indeed create an international incident here. All right.

Iain: Well, it’s one way to get some publicity.

Debbi: There you go, there’s no such thing as bad publicity, right?

Iain: Yeah, yeah. Break up the NATO alliance and get the international incident to generate some coverage for your book. Yeah, I can’t see a problem with that.

Debbi: I could say something here about certain US presidents, but I won’t. I won’t. I won’t.

Iain: Yeah, probably best not to go there.

Debbi: Not doing that. Nope, nope, nope. [crosstalk] Yes.

Iain: So, at the moment my writing has sort of taken a backseat to working with other authors and getting their stuff out. And I, funnily enough, I’ve started writing some bits and pieces this week, during the evenings, so whether they will actually then get me back into the groove of writing, let’s see.

Debbi: Well, I hope so. I hope so because I think that’s a great thing, you know, to write. If you can write, you should write.

Iain: Well, and the thing is, on Facebook, I used to get all this grief on Facebook, because every time I go on Facebook to post something, I get fans, and they come back, what are you doing on Facebook? Why aren’t you chained at the typewriter, getting your next book out? I used to get bollockings from fans for not being sat there writing.

I used to get all this grief on Facebook, because every time I go on Facebook to post something, I get fans, and they come back, what are you doing on Facebook? Why aren’t you chained at the typewriter, getting your next book out? I used to get bollockings from fans for not being sat there writing.

Debbi: Oh, my gosh. That’s kind of like the total opposite of what they tell you. It’s like, oh, be on Facebook so that you can connect with everybody. And you have all your fans saying get off Facebook, and go write something.

Iain: Yeah, don’t connect with me, just get on with writing stuff.

Debbi: Exactly. Yeah. Thank you. Thank you very much. Let’s see. I was going to say what advice would you give to anybody who aspires to get published or publish themselves?

Iain: Get lucky. Get writing and get lucky I think is the honest answer there.

Debbi: Amen to that.

Iain: Yeah, I mean, I’ve — actually, this is a conversation I’ve had with a number of people, let’s say, because we’re now publishers. And you get people, my son or my cousin who is trying to write, could you have a chat with them, that sort of thing. And yeah, my advice is essentially that, get writing because if you don’t write, you’re not a writer, you just need to keep writing and write and write and write. So, get writing, get a rude friend who will go through and say that’s rubbish. Because if you give it to your mum, and she says, it’s fantastic that’s not really helping you. And the third thing is just get lucky because it is such a crapshoot.

And I suppose the fourth thing is get responsible. You, as a writer, are responsible for your own success. You’ve got to make it happen. Whether you’re a published author by a publishing house or not, at the end of the day, it’s your career, you need to make it work. So, you do need to be — And I dread the sort of social media side of it. If I was social I wouldn’t be sitting in my room writing books to be honest. But you do have to engage with an audience and build yourself a fan base and interact with them, etc. So, social media is a necessary evil in this day and age. But you do have to take responsibility for getting out there and selling your stuff. You can’t just hand it over. You can’t just sit there, write something, think I’ve built a better — I’ve written a better mousetrap. The world is going to beat path to my door, hand it to a publisher, the publisher is not going to take your —

You, as a writer, are responsible for your own success. You’ve got to make it happen. Whether you’re a published author by a publishing house or not, at the end of the day, it’s your career, you need to make it work.

On our publishing website, we put a little guide for authors, some tough love thing, essentially. And it says you may have this vision that, you know, you write this fantastic book and it’s going to be [inaudible 00:33:04], and you send it off to us as publishers and we just say, yeah, fantastic. We’re going to publish this. And we have a bit of to and fro about the cover and you know, a bit of Barney about that. And then we as publishers assemble our crack sales team of book salesmen in a big hall and stand up on the podium and say, right, we have this wonderful book, you should go out and sell it to all the bookshops. Off you go. And they all go rah, rah, rah rah, and run out to sell your books.

That’s not how it happens. Sorry. You know, it’s a much more difficult process. Bookshops are only going to stock your book, if there is an audience they think is going to buy it. You know, you can’t go to book shops and say, will you take my book and sell it for me? What bookshops want is you selling it, so people come to them to buy it. And one of the interesting things of working with authors as I’m now doing, running a publishing company, is talking to people about how the book selling process works, why people buy books and what they need to do as authors in order to be able to sell.

And one of the interesting things of working with authors as I’m now doing, running a publishing company, is talking to people about how the book selling process works, why people buy books and what they need to do as authors in order to be able to sell.

Debbi: Yeah. This is something everybody should know.

Why did you buy the last book you bought, is one of the questions I’ll ask. And it’s probably because you’ve read something by that author before and you liked it, your mate told you about it and said you really ought to read this because you’ll like it.

Iain: And you sit there and have a conversation. Yeah. Why did you buy the last book you bought, is one of the questions I’ll ask. And it’s probably because you’ve read something by that author before and you liked it, your mate told you about it and said you really ought to read this because you’ll like it. It’s been on the TV, and so it’s a tie-in. It’s written by some celebrity. You know, there’s a whole raft of reasons that people buy books. And you have most of which do not apply to a first time author. You know, so be aware. This is a sort of marathon, not a sprint. So, we have quite a lot of crunchy conversations with authors about what the reality of the life is.

This is a sort of marathon, not a sprint. So, we have quite a lot of crunchy conversations with authors about what the reality of the life is.

Debbi: There is a definite hierarchy in terms of who gets attention, how, also.

Iain: Yeah, yeah, definitely.

Debbi: It’s just undeniable. And it’s a kind of a financial reality for the publishing industry as well, you know?

Iain: Oh, yeah. Yeah, I mean, [crosstalk] we’re publishing and — Yeah, we’re publishing, and frankly, it’s a money pit. So, we have a budget that we set for each book we put out. And, essentially, I mean, from my business background, I treat us as essentially a business incubator. What I’m looking to find is somebody who’s got a good product, in terms of a book, who I think has got the business acumen to get out there and build and develop a career. And what we are doing is we’re coming in to fund that, and give the support to the launch and start of that career, essentially, but they will need to really make it work.

I treat us as essentially a business incubator. What I’m looking to find is somebody who’s got a good product, in terms of a book, who I think has got the business acumen to get out there and build and develop a career.

So, yeah, so we have quite a substantial budget that we put into each book that we are launching, in the full expectation that we will lose all that money because it will sell buggerall copies. And you are funding essentially a portfolio to see, you know, and same with — as a venture capitalist. I’m going to fund 10 things in the full knowledge that six of them are going to completely sell nothing and disappear. Two or three are going to sort of bubble along and make up, eventually get me back my money. And what I’m looking for is the one that becomes a good hit. Because that’s what pays for all the rest. And then you go on to repeat the thing. So, that’s the business — [crosstalk]

Debbi: That is the publishing industry right there. I’m sorry. Go ahead.

Iain: Yeah. Yeah.

Debbi: That’s how publishing works.

Iain: That’s the business model. Yeah, exactly. So, yeah. So, we’re busy putting stuff out and looking for our big hits that makes it all, you know, looking for our equivalent of Harry Potter that makes it all worthwhile.

Debbi: I think that’s fantastic. I think what you’re doing is fantastic. And is there anything else you’d like to say before we finish up?

Iain: Presumably not just buy my book, because that will be dull.

Debbi: Where can people find you online?

Iain: Yeah, yeah. I mean, online, so my personal publishing website for my books is bad-press.co.uk. And that’s where you’ll find my biker books and other books. And then badpress.ink, I-N-K, is our publishing website where we’re publishing other people’s books. And it’s an eclectic mix. There’s some interesting stuff on there from female-led crime fiction, through to sort of fairly comic horror type stuff. So, it’s quirky, and it’s quite niche. And where we’re doing all sorts of interesting stuff. We’ve just published that. Okay. And you think what the hell is that? Forestfriends.ink. And [crosstalk] that has got — Yes.

So, this is a guy who does comic, essentially comic images on the internet. He’s got 400,000 Twitter followers — 400,000 social media followers. So, we’ve put out a collection of his sort of quite weird and wonderful comic images. And that’s one of the sort of weird things that we are doing. And I have to say, it’s great. The publishing side of it is great fun, working with other authors to help make them a success and get them working with each other because we’ve tried to instill a sort of communal ethos so that people promote each other’s stuff. And that’s a really great fun thing to be doing. I was talking to a bookshop owner and she said nobody does anything in publishing for money. Everybody does it for love. And I think if you don’t come into it for love, you are going to get out of it quite quickly.

I was talking to a bookshop owner and she said nobody does anything in publishing for money. Everybody does it for love. And I think if you don’t come into it for love, you are going to get out of it quite quickly.

Debbi: You will be sorely disappointed.

Iain: Obviously, we — Yeah. And we are, I mean, we’re doing this because we are trying to create a viable sustainable business, so it obviously has to make the return, etc. But if we didn’t love it, we wouldn’t do it. I’d find something else to do with my time and money. Thank you very much.

Debbi: So true. Absolutely true. I couldn’t have said it better. That’s great. Well, I think what you’re doing is fantastic, Iain. I just want to thank you for being here so much. Thanks for talking with us.

Iain: Thank you. I was looking at it, and I think, is this show number 141 or something of the series? Congratulations.

Debbi: I shall have to actually count them at some point. We’re in season seven and it’s the 11th episode of season seven, I believe.

Iain: Congratulations on setting this up and getting it going. I have to say again, that’s a labor of love, isn’t it?

Debbi: It is. It truly is and I got to tell you, it is amazing how it has taken off. I’ve got guests booked into 2023. Can you believe that? I don’t believe it. [crosstalk] Hopefully I’ll still be around.

Iain: Long may you run.

Debbi: Well, thank you. Thank you very much and the same to you as well. That’s awesome.

Iain: Cheers. Thank you very much. Cheers.

Debbi: Cheers. Yes, indeed. On that note, I will just switch back to myself and say that remember everybody but the Crime Cafe has two ebooks. The nine-book box set up the short story anthology with contributors from the first season of the Crime Cafe. And when you get your Kindle or whatever device you like for Christmas, keep that in mind as something that you can download. And we are Patreon supported also, I would like to remind you. So, please check out our Patreon page. And with that, I will just say we are taking a short break for the holiday here in this country that celebrates eating a lot, I guess. And our next guest after the short break will be John Gaspard. In the meantime, take care and happy reading.

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Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Iain Parke. - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBook... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Iain Parke.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, everyone. Before I introduce my guest, I’ll just mention that my latest novel, Fatal Connections is out now. It’s the second Erica Jensen mystery. And since Erica is a female marine veteran, Veterans Day seemed like a good day to have it released. So, if you like hard-boiled mystery, please check it out. Yes, it’s at all the usual retailers, so do check it out, including Amazon, of course. But with me today is a guy who writes about motorcycle clubs, or as it’s described on his website, Biker Noir. I like that description. You should totally check out his writing sample on his website. It’s really awesome. And with me today then is Iain Parke. Hi, Iain. How are you doing?<br /> <br /> Iain Parke: Hi, very well. Thank you. Greetings from across the pond on a fairly grotty November night.<br /> <br /> Debbi: It’s kind of grotty around here. It’s not nice, but it’s been raining. Actually, it was kind of nice. It’s cleared up and well, we kind of went from rain to cleared up. So, it was not so bad, really when it comes down to it. [crosstalk]<br /> <br /> Iain: Yeah, you can tell you’re talking to someone from England because we’re on to the weather already. I mean that’s all we talk about.<br /> <br /> Debbi: That’s all we talk about in Maryland too, that’s interesting. Very, very interesting. I got to tell you though, I noticed you have an MBA and an interesting background, insolvency and business restructuring. So, the fact that you kind of drew on that experience to write a conspiracy thriller as a novel seem to suggest something dire.<br /> <br /> Iain: Yeah. I did an MBA and was interested in running businesses, and set out effectively to have a career in running businesses and doing just things in this sort of distressed business space. And I won’t bore you with the career history, but essentially at one point I ended up, I wanted to get a secondment. I was working for PwC, one of the big firms at the time and I wanted to secondment to Canada and I ended up in Tanzania, which just proves my geography is fairly lousy. So, from going to the west coast of Canada to going to East Africa, I ended up sort of running a match factory with about ... Debbi Mack 43:30
Philip Marlowe in ‘The Heart of Gold’: S. 7, Ep. 10 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/philip-marlowe-in-the-heart-of-gold-s-7-ep-10/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=philip-marlowe-in-the-heart-of-gold-s-7-ep-10 Sun, 07 Nov 2021 04:05:00 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22345 This week, in lieu of a guest author, we have an episode courtesy of Old Time Radio! :) It's the Philip Marlowe episode, "The Heart of Gold". This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. The transcript of this show and any other Old Time Radio episodes are being made available to patrons of the show! Next week's guest will be Iain Parke. Enjoy the podcast! :)     This week, in lieu of a guest author, we have an episode courtesy of Old Time Radio! 🙂 It’s the Philip Marlowe episode, “The Heart of Gold”.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

The transcript of this show and any other Old Time Radio episodes are being made available to patrons of the show!

Next week’s guest will be Iain Parke.

Enjoy the podcast! 🙂

 

 

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This week, in lieu of a guest author, we have an episode courtesy of Old Time Radio! :) It's the Philip Marlowe episode, "The Heart of Gold". - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. This week, in lieu of a guest author, we have an episode courtesy of Old Time Radio! :) It's the Philip Marlowe episode, "The Heart of Gold".<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The transcript of this show and any other Old Time Radio episodes are being made available to patrons of the show!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Next week's guest will be Iain Parke.<br /> <br /> Enjoy the podcast! :)<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />   Debbi Mack 30:58
Interview with Crime Writer Anne Laughlin: S. 7, Ep. 9 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-anne-laughlin-s-7-ep-9/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-anne-laughlin-s-7-ep-9 Sun, 24 Oct 2021 04:05:09 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22317 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Anne Laughlin. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi everyone. My guest today has authored six crime novels, including her latest book, Money Creek, which she's offered as a giveaway. The first two commenters on her website on the contact page will each get a copy. She is a four-time Goldie Award winner and been shortlisted for a Lammy Award three times. She also reviews contemporary LGBTQ literature at the Lambda Literary Review. A resident of Chicago, it's my great pleasure to have with me, Anne Laughlin. Hi, Anne, how are you doing? Anne: Hi, Debbi. I'm doing great. How are you? Debbi: Good. Thank you. Let's see. I want to thank you, first of all, for being here today. Anne: Oh, it's a pleasure to be here. Debbi: And taking the time to talk with me. Anne: Yeah. Debbi: To all of us. And your books, they're all standalones, correct? Anne: That's right. I have yet to start a series, though I keep thinking I will. Maybe— Debbi: I was going to ask you. Anne: Yeah. The book I'm writing now would work out for a series character. But you know what, when you write a series, you really should be more mindful than I'm being and have in mind kind of an overall arc for that character. Debbi: Exactly. Anne: Be thinking ahead several books. Yeah. Debbi: Yes, exactly. Anne: I don't think I can think ahead several. I don't know if I have that capacity. Debbi: You might be surprised. Anne: Yeah. Yeah. So yes, all standalones and kind of a combination of traditional mystery, suspense novels, police procedural, the private investigator. Debbi: That's really cool that you have that kind of mix there. Anne: Yeah. Debbi: I notice that in a few of your books, quite a few it seems, you either have legal issues or a lawyer involved. And I wondered if you had a legal background. Anne: Yes. I, for many years, worked in large law firms as a trial assistant, and that... I burned out from that eventually and had to leave the business. But while I was there, I learned so much about lawyering, and what I learned, I was able to take in with me as I was writing books. So, because it was a comfortable milieu, I used it more than once. And also, lawyers are good topic or good subjects for crime novels. Debbi: Yes, they are, very much so. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Anne Laughlin.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.

Debbi: Hi everyone. My guest today has authored six crime novels, including her latest book, Money Creek, which she’s offered as a giveaway. The first two commenters on her website on the contact page will each get a copy. She is a four-time Goldie Award winner and been shortlisted for a Lammy Award three times. She also reviews contemporary LGBTQ literature at the Lambda Literary Review. A resident of Chicago, it’s my great pleasure to have with me, Anne Laughlin. Hi, Anne, how are you doing?

Anne: Hi, Debbi. I’m doing great. How are you?

Debbi: Good. Thank you. Let’s see. I want to thank you, first of all, for being here today.

Anne: Oh, it’s a pleasure to be here.

Debbi: And taking the time to talk with me.

Anne: Yeah.

Debbi: To all of us. And your books, they’re all standalones, correct?

Anne: That’s right. I have yet to start a series, though I keep thinking I will. Maybe—

Debbi: I was going to ask you.

Anne: Yeah. The book I’m writing now would work out for a series character. But you know what, when you write a series, you really should be more mindful than I’m being and have in mind kind of an overall arc for that character.

Debbi: Exactly.

Anne: Be thinking ahead several books. Yeah.

Debbi: Yes, exactly.

Anne: I don’t think I can think ahead several. I don’t know if I have that capacity.

Debbi: You might be surprised.

Anne: Yeah. Yeah. So yes, all standalones and kind of a combination of traditional mystery, suspense novels, police procedural, the private investigator.

Debbi: That’s really cool that you have that kind of mix there.

Anne: Yeah.

Debbi: I notice that in a few of your books, quite a few it seems, you either have legal issues or a lawyer involved. And I wondered if you had a legal background.

Anne: Yes. I, for many years, worked in large law firms as a trial assistant, and that… I burned out from that eventually and had to leave the business. But while I was there, I learned so much about lawyering, and what I learned, I was able to take in with me as I was writing books. So, because it was a comfortable milieu, I used it more than once. And also, lawyers are good topic or good subjects for crime novels.

Debbi: Yes, they are, very much so. I have to agree with you there. Let’s see.

Anne: In fact, the last book, Money Creek, that has a lawyer from a large law firm, and I don’t paint the law firm in very pretty colors. [Laughing] She was an evacuee from a large law firm.

Debbi: Yeah. It can be a bit rough working at a law firm.

Anne: Oh, I was working 90 hours a week sometimes. So it was terrible.

Debbi: It’s really amazing how much work lawyers put into their jobs. How much time and how much effort. And one of the things I’ve actually done is I’ve recently interviewed a local lawyer about criminal issues, and I’m kind of examining them one at a time. And I’m sort of interested in getting feedback from authors about whether they would be interested in hearing various legal issues and how they might use them or get them right or wrong in their work.

Anne: I think that would be a great service. I don’t think I’ve seen that elsewhere.

Debbi: Wow.

Anne: I mean, and because there were certain… just simple procedural things that authors could learn would be very helpful in kind of grounding a legal issue in your book.

Debbi: I agree.

Anne: Yeah.

Debbi: I think it’s great that you have that awareness. That’s fantastic.

Anne: It’s actually proven to be very helpful. And then the last 20 years of my career, working career, was in real estate, and I haven’t used that as much, but I have plunked it in there a few times.

Debbi: Real estate. Now there was a subject I could never quite get into, real estate.

Anne: Yeah. Yeah.

Debbi: It’s complex. Let’s see. How do you choose your protagonist for each of your stories? What is it that inspires a particular story in you?

Anne: What is it that inspires a particular story? I usually come up with a plot idea before I come up with a character idea. And I know everyone does that differently. I try to come up with a subject that I’m going to want to write 300 pages about or a story that I think is going to be rich enough to sustain 300 pages. And then I think about what character would be interesting in grappling with the problems that come with that plot. And there’s definitely a similarity in my books and with a lot of crime… with mystery books, which is the strong female detective private investigator slash, slash. Who is brave, who doesn’t take any gruff from people, and is determined beyond belief. Also, who has some big flaw or another that adds to the plots. And it provides a way for that character to grow during the course of the book.

Debbi: Absolutely.

Anne: Yeah. So one protagonist, in particular, that was different for me was a book I wrote called The Acquittal, and that was a private investigator protagonist. And she had bipolar disorder, and I was trying to think up what kind of flaw do I want for this protagonist? And it just occurred to me that a mental health issue is not one that had been dealt with all that much with protagonists. There’s a famous Monk TV show, of course, the anxiety. Bipolar disorder is a serious disease. And I have her mostly under control through medication throughout the book because I didn’t want it to be just her having one episode after another. But the tension came in as the stress grew on Josie throughout the course of the book. So did the danger that she would have another manic episode. So it provided another area of tension for the novel.

Debbi: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Anne: And it was really interesting to research.

Debbi: I can imagine.

Anne: Yeah. I talked to quite a few psychiatrists and one person who has the disorder.

Debbi: My goodness. I can imagine the research that went into that. I was going to ask you about how much research you do before you write a book and during time you write a book.

Anne: Yeah. A lot of that research comes as I’m going along in the book. For instance, right now I’m writing a book that involves a sober living house owned by a larger recovery company. And my research was into the abuse in that industry. And I wanted to find, what are certain things that ultimately are done to the residents of those homes that are corrupt basically? And it was very interesting. I mean, Florida is famous for houses like this, where they advertise these really nice houses and people come and there are three people to a room and people are using drugs in the house and all of that. This is not going to be that story, but I do introduce some well-known ways that these homes are scammed and the residents in them.

Debbi: Wow.

Anne: So that was interesting research. And I was going to write a book, and may still, about the French Resistance. I wanted to maybe set a mystery within that setting. And that research, I mean, I got really elbow deep in that research, which is fascinating. And I would like to use that.

Debbi: That is so interesting because I’ve always been fascinated by that aspect of the war.

Anne: I know. I mean, to me, it’s extraordinary the role that women played in the Resistance. It was a phenomenal role. And the question I always ask myself is if I were put in the same situation where I was asked to parachute into enemy territory and likely be shot and killed, what would I do? And I think that’s a question that, in our relatively pampered lives, we’ve never had to ask ourselves.

Debbi: Yes.

Anne: And it’s really an interesting question. I think particularly for women who aren’t socialized to be brave, to face physical danger. And yet, these women were so brave. It was really amazing.

Debbi: Yes. Yes. There’s a book actually that I read that deals with two women who were in the French resistance. I wish I could remember the name offhand.

Anne: Yeah. I probably read it.

Debbi: Something like Nightingale or Nightshade.

Anne: Oh, it’s by Kristin Hannah. It’s Nightingale and—

Debbi: Nightingale?

Anne: Yeah. It’s fiction.

Debbi: Right.

Anne: Yeah. That was Kristin Hannah. That was a very good… Yeah.

Debbi: Yeah.

Anne: That was a very good book. Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Debbi: Oh my gosh. The ending on that one.

Anne: Yeah.

Debbi: Killer. Just killer.

Anne: I also recommend in terms of fiction, a book called Jackdaws, J-A-C-K-D A-W-S, by Ken Follett. That might’ve been the most exciting book I read on the topic.

Debbi: Interesting. I’ll have to check that one out. Definitely.

Anne: Yeah. Do.

Debbi: Wow. Tell us a little about your latest book Money Creek.

Anne: Sure. Money Creek is the story of Clare Lehane, who is a lawyer. Just graduated from law school probably two years before the setting of the book. And while she was in law school, she acquired a bit of a problem with amphetamines and really had an addiction to them by the time she entered the work world. And like most addicts, I mean, her problem just got worse with time. She was able to function pretty highly. But as the book goes on, that is less and less true. And her inability to make good decisions drives the plot in many ways. I mean, she gets involved with a rural organized crime organization that is very dangerous, and there’s murders and false accusations and all kinds of stuff that she ultimately… almost buries her. And so, seeing what she does to get out of that and repair herself as a person is also one of the main themes of the book.

Debbi: That’s a great—

Anne:
Yeah. I’ve gotten lots of great comments about Money Creek. One interesting thing about it. I happen to like Clare quite a bit. Clare is not the most popular of my protagonists, and I think it’s simply a function of the fact that she’s an addict. And so she’s making some dumb choices. And I think that asked a little bit more of the reader than maybe some other books. You had to kind of stick with Clare. Though I tried to make her interesting and somebody you could relate to. I, personally, have been in recovery for 32 years. So, to me, Clare’s story follows a very predictable path. And one that I wanted to just… I wanted to write about it.

Debbi: I can understand that. Definitely.

Anne: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Debbi: I think any character, really, even a character that makes dumb choices can be made to be understandable and empathetic to readers if there’s enough there for them to relate to and be able to say, “Okay, I can understand why in this situation she would maybe think that.”

Anne: Yeah, well, I hope that I accomplish that. And I think I did. But that’s the difficulty, is keeping somebody in that much trouble relatable. And addiction is its own specific thing. It’s hard for non-addicts to understand the thinking of a bottoming-out addict or alcoholic. The thinking is not clear.

Debbi: Yes, yes. That is absolutely true. Your books are mostly set around Chicago, correct?

Anne: Correct.

Debbi: How much of a character is the town itself?

Anne: I think I try to keep Chicago in sight during most of the books. So I will describe where my character is going by giving street names, neighborhood descriptions. Chicago’s so much more than downtown. It’s a city of neighborhoods, and each of those neighborhoods has its own character. So I try to do some of that along with its more famous attributes. Like, its winter, like the beauty of Lake Michigan, like its miraculous downtown skyline, which is famous for a reason. It’s really spectacular.

I think I try to keep Chicago in sight during most of the books. So I will describe where my character is going by giving street names, neighborhood descriptions. Chicago’s so much more than downtown. It’s a city of neighborhoods, and each of those neighborhoods has its own character.

Debbi: So do you ever run into Sara Paretsky just walking down the street? I had to ask.

Anne: Yeah. I have six degrees of separation with Sara Paretsky—

Debbi: Oh, wow.

Anne: … with about five people. I’d love to meet her sometime.

Debbi: Oh my gosh. Yes.

Anne: She actually lives in Hyde Park, which is down on the South Side. I’m on the North Side.

Debbi: Ahh.

Anne: Yeah. It’s very North Side, South Side.

Debbi: Well, I’m a big fan of Sarah Paretsky. I got to tell you.

Anne: Yeah. Yeah.

Debbi: She was one of my early inspirations there—

Anne: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Debbi: … in terms of before I really got into this. And what was it you’re working on now? What’s…

Anne: It’s going to be called Olive Street House, and that’s the name of this sober living house. And my character is a former cop. So I’m still dealing with the same theme of addiction, but this is more in the way of a setting as opposed to the disease. So the setting of a sober living home just seem to me to be unique, filled with opportunity to… You can populate it with all kinds of characters. And you can generate all kinds of drama based on the residents alone. So in this story, Nikki is the name of my character.

So the setting of a sober living home just seem to me to be unique, filled with opportunity to… You can populate it with all kinds of characters. And you can generate all kinds of drama based on the residents alone.

Anne: She lost her job as a homicide detective five years earlier when she crashed out of the department because of her drinking. And then she became the resident manager of this… of Olive Street House. So she’s responsible for the 18 women living there. And one of these women is accused of stealing and kicked out of the house. And I don’t want to say too much more, but that starts the train of the mystery. Somebody’s murdered from the house. Nikki investigates. And actually, I don’t know what because I’m only about a third of the way through writing it. So I’m still working out that final third of the book.

Debbi: So I take it you’re more of a pantser than a plotter?

Anne: Well, it’s interesting because I’ve always been, I call it like a planster. It’s kind of a little bit of both.

Traditionally I plot maybe five or six scenes in advance, so I know where I’m going in the near future. I don’t always have those headlights on the end of the book. So I just kind of nudge it forward.

Anne: Yeah. Traditionally I plot maybe five or six scenes in advance, so I know where I’m going in the near future. I don’t always have those headlights on the end of the book. So I just kind of nudge it forward. With this book, I did something a little different, and I approached it with the… There’s something called a beat sheet, which is—

Debbi: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Anne: … there are 15 points on the beat sheet that you use to kind of time the progress of your plot. And I wanted to see what it was like to be a complete plotter as opposed to a pantser. And so far, I’m finding it really interesting to work with. But I’m kind of at that same space where I’ve done outline. I’ve done the beats, but you still have to fill in all the details, and those come as I’m writing.

Debbi: That’s a screenwriter trick too, you know.

Anne: Exactly.

Anne: And in fact, this beat sheet comes from Save the Cat, which—

Debbi: Oh, yeah.

Anne: Yeah. Save the Cat was-

Debbi: I’m familiar.

Anne: Yeah. It was originally a screenwriting method that they’ve just written a book and applied it to novel writing.

Debbi: Yeah, absolutely. It applies to any kind of storytelling, really, when you come down to it.

Anne: And like any kind of method, you can’t adhere to it slavishly at all. So I’m finding that I’m not exactly on those 15 beats.

Debbi: There are no rules. There are only guidelines.

Anne: No rules in writing. That’s right.

Debbi: Or, as somebody once said, “There are three rules to writing the novel. Unfortunately, nobody knows what they are.” I think it was Somerset Maugham, but I’m not sure about that.

Anne: Oh, that is a great quote. I like that.

Debbi: It’s one of the first things I ever heard, and I thought, “That is perfect.”

Anne: Yeah.

Debbi: Oh my gosh. So I have to ask, are you a baseball fan?

Anne: Ah. Well, I’m historically a Cubs fan. But I was sorry to see the White Sox lose the [crosstalk 00:22:14]-

Debbi: Yeah. Yeah.

Anne: But it is so bifurcated in the city between Cubs and White Sox that I was barely aware that the White Sox were in the playoffs.

Debbi: Isn’t it interesting?

Anne: Yeah, Yeah.

Debbi: Isn’t that interesting?

Anne: Yeah. But I do like baseball, though the Cubs gave away all their players this year. So it’s a little hard to like them right now.

Debbi: I know the feeling.

Anne: Yeah.

Debbi: The Nats did their share of giving away, and well…

Anne: Yeah.

Debbi: I’m also a big Mets fan because I’m from New York. So what can I say?

Anne: Sure. Yeah.

Debbi: And they were the underdogs when I was growing up.

Anne: Yes.

Debbi: They were the worst…

Anne: Yep. Yep.

Debbi: … when I was growing up.

Anne: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Debbi: But we’ve come a long way, and I’d love to see the Cubs win the Series actually.

Anne: Again. That would be phenomenal.

Debbi: Yeah.

Anne: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Debbi: And I would love to actually experience these things again. I would love to go to Wrigley. Oh my gosh.

Anne: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah.

Debbi: So historic.

Anne: I grew up in the bleachers there.

Debbi: Oh, That’s awesome.

Anne: A dollar for a bleacher seat.

Debbi: I grew up in the bleachers of Shea. Not quite as cool, but at the time, it was what I had.

Anne: That’s right.

Debbi: What writers inspire you most?

Anne: The writers who inspire me most, I really think of that in terms of a lifetime of reading. I mean, I can name certain mystery writers that I particularly love, like Val McDermid, who’s a Scottish writer, but she publishes here in the States. Sara Paretsky would be one. Of the classics, Ruth Rendell, and some people who do psychological mysteries. One influence or one writer that I particularly admire is a woman named Katherine Forrest. And she probably was one of the original writers of lesbian mysteries, which is really basically the area I’ve been writing in for the last 15 years.

One influence or one writer that I particularly admire is a woman named Katherine Forrest. And she probably was one of the original writers of lesbian mysteries, which is really basically the area I’ve been writing in for the last 15 years.

Anne: And we can talk about that a little bit about how that’s kind of ghettoized. But Katherine really broke a lot of boundaries in writing her series. And to me, as a young woman in the ’70s, I go way back when coming out was extremely difficult. Her books were instrumental to me. Not only did they give me a sense of community. They also gave me a sense of justice being obtained, which is not something, at that time, in the LGBT world that we got very much of. And I think it’s still an issue. So those works were phenomenal to me.

Katherine really broke a lot of boundaries in writing her series. And to me, as a young woman in the ’70s, I go way back when coming out was extremely difficult. Her books were instrumental to me.

Debbi: Well, that’s very interesting. You see, I’ve heard of the others, but I’ve never heard of Katherine Forrest.

Debbi: So for the benefit of listeners, how would you spell her name? Is it with a C? Catherine?

Anne: It’s Katherine with a K.

Debbi: Katherine with a K.

Anne: And it’s F-O-R-R-E-S-T.

Debbi: I’d be very interested in checking her work out.

Anne: Yeah. They’re a little dated now. They come from quite a long time ago. And it’s interesting because you really see the difference in what gay crime writers wrote in those years, as opposed to what’s being written now.

Debbi: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Anne: Because then there were real issues that every gay person had to grapple with. Now in times are a little easier. You don’t do the coming out story as much, or the oppression at work story much, or the bullying story as much. All of those things still happen, but they’re more the exception than the rule. So the gay character has just been plopped right into regular old life. And you just proceed with them as a character who happens to be gay. They might happen to be tall as well, but it’s really not much more of an issue than that.

So the gay character has just been plopped right into regular old life. And you just proceed with them as a character who happens to be gay. They might happen to be tall as well, but it’s really not much more of an issue than that.

Debbi: Right.

Anne: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Debbi: Right. It’s very interesting how differently this whole issue is being treated now in the media. Books, television, and movies.

Anne: Oh, now people are kind of hungry for gay characters. There are literary agents who, of course, are the gatekeepers of the publishing world. And I’ve been reading things from them where they’re seeking LGBTQ authors, which, believe me, was not the case before. Before it was, it’s all a matter of numbers. And publishers just felt that only gay people read gay books.

Debbi: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Anne: And to the extent that that opinion is being changed, they’re opening up their acceptance of books more. But I think it will really… I mean, and I believe that straight people read gay content a lot. It’s not a big issue to most people.

Debbi: They certainly watch it on TV.

Anne: And yeah. And it’s certainly translatable to the page, and I would love to see books, my books particularly. Now I’d love to see them move from the LGBTQ shelf in your local bookstore into the mystery shelving of the local bookstore.

Debbi: Absolutely. Yeah.

Anne: On the other hand, it’s complicated because you want gay people to find your book.

Debbi: Absolutely.

Anne: Yeah. So the marketing is tricky but possible.

Debbi: I was going to ask you about the marketing. How do you handle book marketing?

Anne: Well, my publisher is a small publisher, so they don’t do all that much. I think I do not enough, that’s clear. I don’t Twitter a lot. I do Facebook, and I try to put everything that I do up on Facebook. And I try to get booked for podcasts and panels. I appear on quite a few panels. I’m currently working with a group of other lesbian mystery writers to try to advance our visibility. So we’re working on panels and presentations and things like that. But the marketing is hard. And the best thing to do, of course, is to hire a publicist. I just haven’t been able to put out that kind of money yet.

Debbi: Yeah.

Anne: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Debbi: To the extent that you can do things for free, like coordinating with other authors and promoting each other. That’s a great thing.

Anne: Yes. Yes. I think being in a community of writers is really important because not only do you learn a lot from them, but you get a lot of word of mouth from other writers that you know. If they’ve read your book, they will recommend it to other people or on their blog or in whatever. And not only that, it’s just fun to be with other writers.

Debbi: Absolutely. I agree with you there, boy. What advice would you give to people who aspire to get published?

Anne: Well, quality is the thing you need to keep in mind all the time. It’s when you finished writing your first draft of a book, it’s not done. And to keep that in mind, because now comes the painful part of having to analyze your book, or have other… ideally get help from others with feedback about your book and making adjustments. Because getting a literary agent to look at your book, you have to be extremely polished. There’s just no question. They won’t go past page one, really, if you… So writing, rewriting, rewriting is the biggest advice I can give. Taking classes is huge. There just are craft issues that you’re not going to be able to intuit. And just taking one or two classes will give you language and some tools that are invaluable.

So writing, rewriting, rewriting is the biggest advice I can give. Taking classes is huge. There just are craft issues that you’re not going to be able to intuit.

Anne: And another one would be to grow a thick skin because you are going to… I am a member of a writing group. And when I get the feedback back from them, it can be extensive and kind of tough to take. But you just have to take it and review it. And take what makes sense and leave the rest, but know that it’s given in your best interest. It’s not given—

Debbi: That’s right.

Anne:
It’s not given because somebody wants something over you. And the other way skin gets thickened is just reading reviews.

Debbi: Yes.

Anne: Yeah. And—

Debbi: … learn to take that criticism because the readers aren’t going to be holding back.

Anne: No, no, they don’t. And luckily, I don’t have too much experience with really bad reviews, but you read them. And 15 years ago, it hurt. It hurt a lot. But now, I barely give it a thought.

Debbi: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Anne: And that’s something that’s just good for living your life anyway. To be able to have things like that roll off your back a bit more.

Debbi: I agree completely. I couldn’t agree more. Let’s see. Where can readers find you and your books online other than Facebook?

Anne: Yes. My website is annelaughlinwriter.com. And I’d love to hear from you there. There’s a comments function, and also you can buy my books from the website. I try to keep the events on there. I don’t have anything coming up. I don’t think. But you can also find me, where else? Maybe not enough places.

Debbi: Oh. As long as they know your website and as long as you’re connecting with your readers somehow that…

Anne: Yeah.

Debbi: That’s what you got to do.

Anne: Yeah. Right, right.

Debbi: Absolutely.

Anne: And my publisher’s website as well, of course.

Debbi: And your publisher’s also. You can buy them directly from your publisher as well.

Anne: Right. Right.

Debbi: And is there anything else you’d like to add before we finish up?

Anne: Well, I guess I would just add that I’m right now very excited about writing, and that hasn’t been the case over the last year. I had to actually scuttle a book that I had completed two drafts on, and it was just a… I don’t know. I know this happens to other writers, so I’m going to try not to think of it as wasted time. But the book didn’t work, and it wasn’t going to work. And so I had to put it in the drawer, which is painful.

Debbi: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Anne: But as soon as I did, I felt so free and started this new book and just having fun. So I think for all writers, the experience of writing is just such a rollercoaster. There are times when your fingers are flying on the keyboard, and you have no conception of time, and it’s just magical. And other times when you question your very validity as a person, I mean—

Debbi: You start to wonder why you chose this profession.

Anne: Oh yeah. Yeah. Because clearly, I’m not good enough to do it. I mean, we’re our own worst critics for sure.

Debbi: Absolutely. That’s so true.

Anne: Yeah. And sometimes that voice is very loud, and it’s good to talk to other writers about that. It’s kind of the support other writers can give you.

Debbi: That’s a great point. Thank you.

Anne: You’re welcome.

Debbi: So I just want to thank you so much for spending time with us today, and I really appreciate your being here, Anne. Thanks so much.

Anne: It was really fun. I’m so glad you asked me. I appreciate that. And it was a pleasure to be here.

Debbi: Excellent. Well, I’d love to having you here and if I can get this to change over. There we go. Here I am. Voila. Here I am. Everywhere you go there you are.

Anne: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Debbi: And as of now, I just wanted to say that my own new release, Fatal Connections, the second Erica Jensen novel, will be coming out, hopefully, November 11th. That’s the planned release date in honor of my Marine veteran protagonist. And just in time for the holidays–hint, hint! Anyhow, please consider leaving a review of the podcast and becoming a patron on Patreon. Let’s see. It costs less than a Starbucks coffee to become a patron on Patreon. Patron on Patreon. I’m tongue-tied. In any case, I hope you’ll consider it. And thanks again for listening. In two weeks, I’ll be back and be interviewing Paul D. Marks. In the meantime, take care and happy reading.

*****

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Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Anne Laughlin. - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eB... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Anne Laughlin.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. My guest today has authored six crime novels, including her latest book, Money Creek, which she's offered as a giveaway. The first two commenters on her website on the contact page will each get a copy. She is a four-time Goldie Award winner and been shortlisted for a Lammy Award three times. She also reviews contemporary LGBTQ literature at the Lambda Literary Review. A resident of Chicago, it's my great pleasure to have with me, Anne Laughlin. Hi, Anne, how are you doing?<br /> <br /> Anne: Hi, Debbi. I'm doing great. How are you?<br /> <br /> Debbi: Good. Thank you. Let's see. I want to thank you, first of all, for being here today.<br /> <br /> Anne: Oh, it's a pleasure to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: And taking the time to talk with me.<br /> <br /> Anne: Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: To all of us. And your books, they're all standalones, correct?<br /> <br /> Anne: That's right. I have yet to start a series, though I keep thinking I will. Maybe—<br /> <br /> Debbi: I was going to ask you.<br /> <br /> Anne: Yeah. The book I'm writing now would work out for a series character. But you know what, when you write a series, you really should be more mindful than I'm being and have in mind kind of an overall arc for that character.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Exactly.<br /> <br /> Anne: Be thinking ahead several books. Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yes, exactly.<br /> <br /> Anne: I don't think I can think ahead several. I don't know if I have that capacity.<br /> <br /> Debbi: You might be surprised.<br /> <br /> Anne: Yeah. Yeah. So yes, all standalones and kind of a combination of traditional mystery, suspense novels, police procedural, the private investigator.<br /> <br /> Debbi: That's really cool that you have that kind of mix there.<br /> <br /> Anne: Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I notice that in a few of your books, quite a few it seems, you either have legal issues or a lawyer involved. And I wondered if you had a legal background.<br /> <br /> Anne: Yes. I, for many years, worked in large law firms as a trial assistant, and that... I burned out from that eventually and had to leave the business. Debbi Mack 38:48
Interview with Crime Writer Sandra Wells: S. 7, Ep. 8 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-sandra-wells-s-7-ep-8/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-sandra-wells-s-7-ep-8 Sun, 10 Oct 2021 04:05:08 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22275 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Sandra Wells. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi everyone. Before we get started, I want to thank everyone who participated in the DMRF's Virtual Zoo Day on September 25th. They include Sharon Anderson, Santina Caruso, Robert Chamness, Carolyn Chun, Marlena Cook, Scott Davis, Paul Downie, Eirlys Evans, Eric Flint, Rip and Denise Gardner, NM, Kenneth MacClune, Kathy Owens Hankins, Connie Ridgway, Sarah Sensory and Brandy Yassa. Thank you so much for participating and being on my DMRF Dystonia team. I really, really appreciate it. DMV Dystonia, that was the name of the team. Thank you so much for participating and being on my DMRF [DMV] Dystonia team. I really, really appreciate it. Debbi: In any event, today we have with us, an author who began writing in March of 2020 and has produced six novels and a children's short story since last year. She lives in Saint Clair, Tennessee, enjoys photography and is searching for the perfect barn picture in the Tennessee and North Carolina areas. Our guest today is Sandra Wells. Hi Sandra. Good to see you. Sandra: Hi. Thank you for having me on. Debbi: Sure thing. No problem. Sandra: The Halloween story is not so much of a kid's Halloween story, it's pretty out there. I wouldn't recommend to read it to kids. Debbi: Huh. You've written six books in less than two years. In my book, that's pretty impressive and I've always been amazed with people who can crank stuff out like that. How do you stay so consistently productive? Sandra: I started writing when I was 59, when I turned 59, on a bet with a friend of mine. Her father and mother... her name is Valerie Bloom, were authors and she bet me that I couldn't write a book. So I had to take her up on it and I wrote my first book and I just haven't stopped. Now every two and a half months I could turn one out. I may get tired of it and slack off here, but not so far. I write everything using my cell phone, only my cell phone. Debbi: I noticed. Sandra: That worked out good, because no matter where I'm at, if I have a thought then I've got my cell phone with me. Debbi: That was my thinking. I was going to ask you about that. Do you have any kind of writing schedule, though, that you keep? Are there times that you set aside specifically for writing? Sandra: No, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Sandra Wells.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.

Debbi: Hi everyone. Before we get started, I want to thank everyone who participated in the DMRF’s Virtual Zoo Day on September 25th. They include Sharon Anderson, Santina Caruso, Robert Chamness, Carolyn Chun, Marlena Cook, Scott Davis, Paul Downie, Eirlys Evans, Eric Flint, Rip and Denise Gardner, NM, Kenneth MacClune, Kathy Owens Hankins, Connie Ridgway, Sarah Sensory and Brandy Yassa. Thank you so much for participating and being on my DMRF Dystonia team. I really, really appreciate it. DMV Dystonia, that was the name of the team.

Thank you so much for participating and being on my DMRF [DMV] Dystonia team. I really, really appreciate it.

Debbi: In any event, today we have with us, an author who began writing in March of 2020 and has produced six novels and a children’s short story since last year. She lives in Saint Clair, Tennessee, enjoys photography and is searching for the perfect barn picture in the Tennessee and North Carolina areas. Our guest today is Sandra Wells. Hi Sandra. Good to see you.

Sandra: Hi. Thank you for having me on.

Debbi: Sure thing. No problem.

Sandra: The Halloween story is not so much of a kid’s Halloween story, it’s pretty out there. I wouldn’t recommend to read it to kids.

Debbi: Huh. You’ve written six books in less than two years. In my book, that’s pretty impressive and I’ve always been amazed with people who can crank stuff out like that. How do you stay so consistently productive?

Sandra: I started writing when I was 59, when I turned 59, on a bet with a friend of mine. Her father and mother… her name is Valerie Bloom, were authors and she bet me that I couldn’t write a book. So I had to take her up on it and I wrote my first book and I just haven’t stopped. Now every two and a half months I could turn one out. I may get tired of it and slack off here, but not so far. I write everything using my cell phone, only my cell phone.

Debbi: I noticed.

Sandra: That worked out good, because no matter where I’m at, if I have a thought then I’ve got my cell phone with me.

Debbi: That was my thinking. I was going to ask you about that. Do you have any kind of writing schedule, though, that you keep? Are there times that you set aside specifically for writing?

Sandra: No, I don’t have any kind of method to my madness. I was talking to some of the writers that… they have to have certain music playing, drinking a half a glass of wine, standing in a mud puddle, or something, with bats hanging around them. There are all kind of off-the-wall stuff I’ve heard, but no method to my madness. It’s just whatever. I think of something and it’s like, “Oh, well let’s put that down.”

Debbi: Wow.

Sandra: About two and a half, three hours a day I’d say.

Debbi: How do you keep track of the development of your plot?

Sandra: I start the book and, I’m being honest with you, I don’t have a clue where it’s going and how it develops as it goes.

I start the book and, I’m being honest with you, I don’t have a clue where it’s going and how it develops as it goes.

Debbi: You amaze me!

Sandra: What I do is; every time I stop writing for the day, I email it to myself so I’ll have a backup, because I’ve always worried about that. So, I’ve got like 40 emails with the book at different stages.

Sandra: I don’t know how it’s going to end until about three quarters way through the book. I never know how I’m going to end it.

I don’t know how it’s going to end until about three quarters way through the book. I never know how I’m going to end it.

Debbi: This is really interesting. I’ve never attempted to write a novel on a cell phone, but listening to your method, that’s extremely interesting. Have you ever considered writing screenplays?

Sandra: People told me that my book, The Clock Struck Midnight should be a screenplay and it’s selling really well and people really liked it. It’s about a lady that moves to the Ocracoke Island on the Outer Banks, North Carolina, and buys a bar. I don’t want to give the whole story away, but the ghost of Blackbeard pops to the bar and he gives her all kind of hell and there’s all kinds of stuff going on and everybody really loves the book. They told me that should be one, but I’ve never really actually sat down and tried to write a screenplay, no. I don’t think I’d have a clue how to do it.

Debbi: I have a funny feeling that you would probably take to it if you studied the form, because writing in chunks like that and then sending it to yourself, that seems very screenplay writing to me. Finding those moments, you know what I mean? That you just got to get down.

Sandra: It’s just the way I started doing it. And I don’t ever print it out or anything like that. I just write the book and then I go back to the beginning and I go through it once more and make any changes I want to, and then send it off to the publishers.

Debbi: Who is your publisher?

Sandra: I have one right now, it’s called St. Clair Publishing. He is in McMinnville, Tennessee, and his name is Stan St. Clair and he’s a really nice publisher. I started out with a different publisher. That didn’t work out. They made a lot of promises and had a lot of plans. They just didn’t know how to make them happen.

Debbi: Hmm, I am familiar with that.

Sandra: I bet you are. I self-published my last book. I just had one called One Cent at a Time. Came out a month ago and I self-published that one.

Debbi: Now I have to ask you about that one, because I noticed it was described as a comedy crime novel.

Sandra: I live in a very small town in Tennessee and there’s only one stop sign, one store and one little bitty diner, and it’s not even incorporated. It’s not actually even a town, but it’s about the two ladies that run the diner, own the diner. They have a flood, their pipes freeze, and they have a flood which destroys their kitchen and they can’t get money any other way. So they decide to kidnap a guy. But when they kidnap him and try to collect the ransom, all kinds of crazy things happen. When they try to go get the ransom and there is… One time they’re having the lady that’s sending them the ransom, take it up, attach it to a drone and take it up. And she was going to fly like a fourth of a mile to where they were. But a squirrel hunter shot the drone down and got the money.

I live in a very small town in Tennessee and there’s only one stop sign, one store and one little bitty diner, and it’s not even incorporated. It’s not actually even a town, but it’s about the two ladies that run the diner, own the diner.

Debbi: This sounds like the plot of a Coen Brothers’ movie or something.

Sandra: Every time they try to collect the ransom something weird happens. And it’s a lot of twists and at the end of the book it ends up really good.

Debbi: Fascinating. Let’s see. Your protagonist, from what I gather, is Kelly G?

Sandra: The first four books I wrote were a crime series, New Hampshire Crime Series. I lived in Barrington, New Hampshire for four years, and I really liked the area. I don’t live there anymore, obviously, but I started out writing in what is happening in that area. And it was Kelly G, Detective Kelly G and Detective Carver. And the first four books that I wrote were the New Hampshire Crime Series with them. And then I went totally off the wall and decided to see if I could write a comedy and that’s where The Clock Struck Midnight, One Cent at a Time, came in.

The first four books I wrote were a crime series, New Hampshire Crime Series. I lived in Barrington, New Hampshire for four years, and I really liked the area.

Debbi: Ah, okay, so it’s a standalone that’s part of a series- I’m sorry, what did you say?

Sandra: I said I was just seeing what I could do and what I couldn’t.

Debbi: Right. Always test your limits artistically, I say. And that’s not part of the series then, it’s a standalone?

Sandra: The two books, the two last books are definitely standalone. Both of them. Yes. The first four are a series and the two last books are standalone. And then “Barnaby, The Satisfied Troll”, that’s a twenty-page short story for adults for Halloween.

Debbi: Wow. And One Cent at a Time, would that be your seventh book?

Sandra: That was my sixth one. Unless you count the Halloween story, then it would be seven, yeah.

Sandra: But its been, since March 2020, so it’s been a year and a half.

Debbi: Goodness. Does the series that you wrote, does it have a particular arc in terms of the development of the characters, or do you just sort of wing it?

Sandra: I just sort of wing it. I develop their characters in the first book and I just continued it in the next three.

Debbi: So, you don’t have a plan for them, ultimately, as far as where they end up?

Sandra: No, no. I figured I’d leave people wanting more for a while and then I’d write another one of those in that series.

Debbi: Wow. I mean, I just really admire people who just write by the seat of their pants. I’m just stunned by it.

Sandra: [inaudible 00:11:34]

Debbi: It’s a good way. I mean, if you don’t mind doing a lot of editing afterwards, ’cause I’m sure you have to cut things out and so forth.

Sandra: Yeah. I’d hate for somebody to be watching my Google account for my searches, because I’ve got some pretty wild out.

Debbi: Oh, I Know how you feel.

Sandra: [inaudible 00:11:54].

Debbi: Believe me. Yeah. I mean, I think that’s one of those things about writing crime. You end up doing these weird searches that you can’t explain to others really. How do you explain, you know, researching poisons, different ways to kill people? I don’t know. Different motivations for murder.

Sandra: [inaudible 00:12:21].

Debbi: Let’s see. Well, we talked about the way you write on your phone, so I won’t ask you about that again. But, what writers do you most inspire or what writers do you most admire and inspire your writing?

Sandra: Well, I always liked John Sanford and John Saul and Dean Koontz, and I’m just about to start your nine-book series. I’ve got a couple of them and I’m going to start on that probably tomorrow. I read about three or four books a week. It ranges from everything. I don’t have any particular thing I like to read about, don’t like to read about.

I read about three or four books a week. It ranges from everything. I don’t have any particular thing I like to read about, don’t like to read about.

Debbi: I know the feeling I like to read different types of books. Nonfiction, fiction.

Sandra: Whatever catches my interest. You know? I even waded through one book called Quantum Entanglement. When I started off, I thought “No way I could read this book” and it was really interesting once I got into it.

Debbi: It’s amazing, isn’t it? You just sort of give into the thing. I was going to ask you something and it slipped out of my mind. Oops, Oh well, it’ll come back.

Sandra: I’ve lived all over the place and just met a lot of different characters in my life and been able to tell the way, cause people in different regions, they really do live differently.

Debbi: I know. I have lived all over the place too.

Sandra: Hey, you know what I mean, then. It kind of gives you ideas of different characters and stuff.

Debbi: There is definitely, there are regional differences between the way people act, customs, speech patterns. Oh my gosh. It’s amazing.

Sandra: I even lived in Okinawa, Japan for six months in the nineties. The younger people love me, but the older people, they’d cross the street to keep having to walk up the same side of the street.

Debbi: Wow. Why is that?

Sandra: Because, the bomb and everything. This was Okinawa, yeah. They remembered it. They weren’t too happy with Americans still.

Debbi: My goodness gracious. What advice would you give to anyone who wants to write books?

Sandra: Someone who wants to start writing? Oh Lord. I would just say, if you really want to do it, just sit down and start. You never know what you can do until you actually start trying. And you don’t have to have the entire story in your head, how everything’s going to happen and everything, before you start. You can always develop it as it goes.

I would just say, if you really want to do it, just sit down and start. You never know what you can do until you actually start trying.

Debbi: And no matter what you write, you can always change it later if you don’t like it.

Sandra: Yeah. Like I said, after I finish writing mine, I go through it one time and change things. And then after that, I’m like, “no, I’m not going to go through it again”. You can always go back and add or… you know how it is.

Debbi: That’s right. Yeah.

Sandra: But if you’re really interested in it, it’s something that you want to do, you should pursue it.

Debbi: Absolutely. I agree with you completely. What are you working on now?

Sandra: I am working on the sequel now to The Clock Struck Midnight, my Blackbeard’s ghost book. It’s going to be, It’s Twelve O’Clock and All’s Well, and it’s going to be the sequel to The Clock Struck Midnight because everybody keeps asking me for the sequel for it.

Debbi: This book says really intriguing. The Clock Struck Midnight.

Sandra: You need to read it.

Debbi: Humorous mystery, is that the way you would categorize it?

Sandra: Uh-huh (affirmative).

Debbi: What about the first series? How would you categorize the first four books?

Sandra: I would just say that they’re a crime mystery series because I usually have two plots going on during the book that happen. And, like Fatal Prediction, I had a guy, he got released from jail early and went after his ex-wife and killed her and kidnapped his two young kids that was under four years old, both of them. And he took them up into New Hampshire and took them to a cabin way up in the woods and left them alone with a blizzard going on so he could go collect the ransom money and he ends up getting killed, trying to collect the ransom money. And no one knows where the kids are. So a psychic comes in and, and helps them find where the kids are. But in the meantime, there’s a doctor and a nurse that are delivering babies, but stealing the babies, telling the mothers the babies died and things and sell them for adoption. That’s the second story in the book.

Debbi: My goodness. Let’s see. Is there anything you’d like to add before we finish up?

Sandra: Not really. I really appreciate you having me on and I look forward to reading your books. I just might’ve said, if you want to start writing, just jump in with both feet and however you, you know, do it, just do it. There’s no set way to actually become a writer.

[I]f you want to start writing, just jump in with both feet and however you, you know, do it, just do it. There’s no set way to actually become a writer.

Debbi: Yeah. There are no real rules about this, about how to start. I mean, just start. That’s what it comes down to.

Sandra: Look out for publishers. Pick your publishers carefully.

Debbi: Oh yes. That is definitely. If you’re going to get a publisher, be very careful about who you pick. That is such wisdom right there. Thank you. And where can we, where can someone buy your books?

Sandra: They can all be purchased on Amazon or if you Google ‘books by Sandra Wells’, you can see how to purchase them there. Also, my Clock Struck Midnight is through Target and Books-A-Million, they have it for sale.

Debbi: Excellent. That’s good to know that some stores are carrying your books. That’s great. Cause we depend so much on algorithms these days. It’s kind of nice having the physical product out there. Isn’t it?

Sandra: Yes. I’ve got two or three libraries that carry them and about four bookstores.

Debbi: Well, good. I’m glad we added that part then. Oh, I was going to say my books, actually you mentioned nine books. I have four in a series and I have one, that’s the start of a series that I’m going to be coming out with the sequel later on this year and the others are standalones. Yeah, so just so you know, but they’re all written by me and then for what they’re worth and I hope you enjoy them.

Sandra: Yeah. I found you on Goodreads. I followed you so I can keep up with you.

Debbi: Oh cool. Well, we’ll try. Yeah, because I, you know, I put up a lot of reviews and things. I mean, actually my reviews tend to be on YouTube these days, but whatever. Wherever you can find me, there am. Something like that. Wherever you go, there you are.

Sandra: Well, I don’t know if I’ll ever become as well known as you are. That’s that’s probably doubtful, but you know, I’ve tried. Keep on trying.

Debbi: That’s funny. Cause I don’t, I don’t feel very well known.

Sandra: You are. You should be congratulated on it.

Debbi: Thank you to anybody who knows me for, for being out there and supporting me, I guess. I just want to thank you for being here today, Sandra. It was really nice talking to you and-

Sandra: Thank you.

Debbi: Sure thing. Before we go, I just want to remind you that if you enjoy the programming here, I’d greatly appreciate your support on Patreon. I want to thank everyone for listening and I encourage you to check out that Patreon page because I’m always tinkering with it. Our next guest will be Anne Laughlin. Till then take care and happy reading.

*****

And here’s the link to the Patreon page. Or click the logo! 🙂

 

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Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Sandra Wells. - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBo... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Sandra Wells.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. Before we get started, I want to thank everyone who participated in the DMRF's Virtual Zoo Day on September 25th. They include Sharon Anderson, Santina Caruso, Robert Chamness, Carolyn Chun, Marlena Cook, Scott Davis, Paul Downie, Eirlys Evans, Eric Flint, Rip and Denise Gardner, NM, Kenneth MacClune, Kathy Owens Hankins, Connie Ridgway, Sarah Sensory and Brandy Yassa. Thank you so much for participating and being on my DMRF Dystonia team. I really, really appreciate it. DMV Dystonia, that was the name of the team.<br /> <br /> Thank you so much for participating and being on my DMRF [DMV] Dystonia team. I really, really appreciate it.<br /> <br /> Debbi: In any event, today we have with us, an author who began writing in March of 2020 and has produced six novels and a children's short story since last year. She lives in Saint Clair, Tennessee, enjoys photography and is searching for the perfect barn picture in the Tennessee and North Carolina areas. Our guest today is Sandra Wells. Hi Sandra. Good to see you.<br /> <br /> Sandra: Hi. Thank you for having me on.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Sure thing. No problem.<br /> <br /> Sandra: The Halloween story is not so much of a kid's Halloween story, it's pretty out there. I wouldn't recommend to read it to kids.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Huh. You've written six books in less than two years. In my book, that's pretty impressive and I've always been amazed with people who can crank stuff out like that. How do you stay so consistently productive?<br /> <br /> Sandra: I started writing when I was 59, when I turned 59, on a bet with a friend of mine. Her father and mother... her name is Valerie Bloom, were authors and she bet me that I couldn't write a book. So I had to take her up on it and I wrote my first book and I just haven't stopped. Now every two and a half months I could turn one out. I may get tired of it and slack off here, but not so far. I write everything using my cell phone, only my cell phone.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I noticed.<br /> <br /> Sandra: That worked out good, because no matter where I'm at, if I have a thought then I've got my cell phone with me.<br /> <br /> Debbi Mack
Interview with Crime Writer Rea Frey: S. 7, Ep. 7 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-rea-frey-s-7-ep-7/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-rea-frey-s-7-ep-7 Sun, 26 Sep 2021 04:05:58 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22185 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Rea Frey. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi, everyone. My guest today is the author of several novels, as well as the CEO and founder of Writeway, where basically you get to learn about the publishing industry before you get into this crazy business. Let's see. She lives in Nashville with her husband, daughter, and three wild animals. We'll have to talk about the wild animals too. I'm pleased introduce my guest, Rea Frey. Hi, Rea. Rea: Hello. Debbi: It's so good to have you here. Rea: It's so nice to be here. Thanks for having me. Debbi: Sure thing. I got to say, I love your website so much. It's so clever and pretty. And I like the photo on the homepage with you holding those books that are dripping paint or something. Rea: Yeah. Debbi: I mean, it seems to be a metaphor of some kind. Rea: Yes, we could say it's a metaphor for so many different things, but yeah, it was a fun site to put together. Debbi: Yeah. Yeah. It's great. It's wonderful. I like it. And I like the idea of your show, your podcast, but we'll get into that in a second. Debbi: Tell us first about your books. How would you describe your writing? Is it domestic suspense, thriller? Rea: Yeah. It's domestic suspense, which, in all honesty, when my debut novel came out, Not Her Daughter, and they told me I was in the domestic suspense genre, I was like, "What is that? What is domestic suspense?" I wasn't aiming to write in a genre, but I always like to say I write things that basically scare the shit out of parents. I love to kind of take that worst case scenario, because I'm a parent, and really play out those fears, whether it's kidnapping, a guardian dies, someone disappears. I love playing with that and playing with morality a little bit. So I'm definitely more relationship-based instead of, you know, straight thrillers, but I technically do fall in that domestic suspense category. I wasn't aiming to write in a genre, but I always like to say I write things that basically scare the shit out of parents. I love to kind of take that worst case scenario, because I'm a parent, and really play out those fears, whether it's kidnapping, a guardian dies, someone disappears. I love playing with that and playing with morality a little bit. Debbi: Okay. Well, you know, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Rea Frey.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.

Debbi: Hi, everyone. My guest today is the author of several novels, as well as the CEO and founder of Writeway, where basically you get to learn about the publishing industry before you get into this crazy business. Let’s see. She lives in Nashville with her husband, daughter, and three wild animals. We’ll have to talk about the wild animals too. I’m pleased introduce my guest, Rea Frey. Hi, Rea.

Rea: Hello.

Debbi: It’s so good to have you here.

Rea: It’s so nice to be here. Thanks for having me.

Debbi: Sure thing. I got to say, I love your website so much. It’s so clever and pretty. And I like the photo on the homepage with you holding those books that are dripping paint or something.

Rea: Yeah.

Debbi: I mean, it seems to be a metaphor of some kind.

Rea: Yes, we could say it’s a metaphor for so many different things, but yeah, it was a fun site to put together.

Debbi: Yeah. Yeah. It’s great. It’s wonderful. I like it. And I like the idea of your show, your podcast, but we’ll get into that in a second.

Debbi: Tell us first about your books. How would you describe your writing? Is it domestic suspense, thriller?

Rea: Yeah. It’s domestic suspense, which, in all honesty, when my debut novel came out, Not Her Daughter, and they told me I was in the domestic suspense genre, I was like, “What is that? What is domestic suspense?” I wasn’t aiming to write in a genre, but I always like to say I write things that basically scare the shit out of parents. I love to kind of take that worst case scenario, because I’m a parent, and really play out those fears, whether it’s kidnapping, a guardian dies, someone disappears. I love playing with that and playing with morality a little bit. So I’m definitely more relationship-based instead of, you know, straight thrillers, but I technically do fall in that domestic suspense category.

I wasn’t aiming to write in a genre, but I always like to say I write things that basically scare the shit out of parents. I love to kind of take that worst case scenario, because I’m a parent, and really play out those fears, whether it’s kidnapping, a guardian dies, someone disappears. I love playing with that and playing with morality a little bit.

Debbi: Okay. Well, you know, so people understand what it is you write, it’s a convenient label, right?

Rea: Yep. It is a convenient label, yes.

Debbi: Are all your books standalones?

Rea: Yes, they are. You know, my first one, again, my debut, Not Her Daughter, was supposed to be a sequel, and one publisher wanted the standalone, which is who I went with, St. Martin’s Press, because I wanted the clout of the “Big Five” behind me, and then the other publisher was more of kind of a niche publisher. They were great, but they wanted me to have the sequel. They wanted me to be a lead title, they wanted to do the hardback book. And I was very romanced by going with the big boys.

Rea: So I did that. And as a result, yeah, I got a four-book deal and they were all standalones. And after that first book, I was like, “Well, I don’t know what I’m going to write.” This debut just fell out. I mean, I wrote it so fast. And every subsequent book, I was like, “Okay, now what, now what, now what?”

Rea: So it was an interesting experience. It didn’t quite flow like the first book, but it was all so fun and such a learning experience, that’s for sure.

Debbi: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah. So have you ever even considered writing a series?

Rea: You know, that’s a great question. I mean, yes. With Not Her Daughter, I actually went ahead and kind of worked on a sequel because that book really felt unfinished to me. But besides that, I feel like when I am done with a book, I’m very much like a screenwriter, when I’m done, I’m like, “Great. Onto the next project.” I never want to think about the book again. I never even want to look at it again. So I think to stay with those characters book after book would be a challenge for me personally.

Debbi: Mm-hmm (affirmative). And just so you know, I do screenwriting, and screenwriting is a whole lot of rewriting.

Rea: Yes.

Debbi: A whole lot of [crosstalk 00:05:01].

Rea: A whole lot of rewriting, but I love, when you are done, if you’re ever really done, you’re not responsible, like with a book, you know, having the book launch and doing the tour and doing all of these things. It’s like boom, it can be out, you can sell it and move on with your life. And I love that. That’s so attractive to me.

Debbi: It does have that, although it is hard to make sales.

Rea: Yes.

Debbi: It is as hard to make sales in screenwriting as it is … Even harder actually.

Rea: I believe it.

Debbi: It’s a level of commitment that you really have to be serious about.

Rea: Yes.

Debbi: Let’s see. Tell us about your latest book then. What is your latest book about?

Rea: Yeah, so my upcoming book, it doesn’t come out until February actually, and it’s called Secrets of Our House. And it’s really about this woman, Desi, who’s kind of an affluent business owner, and she decides to bring her family to this summer mountain home that she’s built from scratch, and it’s called The Black House.

Rea: And when she does this, when they all come for the summer, everything starts to unravel. Her husband might want a divorce; her daughter, who’s on the precipice of going to college, she falls in love for the first time, decides she doesn’t want to go to college; her irresponsible brother shows up unannounced; and then her past literally comes knocking, which threatens to reveal the biggest, most damaging secret of all.

Rea: So this book, more than any of my other books, is a little bit more family saga, I would say, versus straight up suspense. It’s a little bit of a departure from the previous books that were very more suspense-based. So it has a little bit of a different feel than my previous books.

Debbi: Interesting.

Rea: Yeah.

Debbi: So you’re able to get past that four book block, so to speak, and you wrote this next one.

Rea: Well, so this one is my fourth one and then-

Debbi: Oh, it is the fourth one. Okay.

Rea: Yeah, it is the fourth one. And then, yeah, I’m parting ways with my publisher, in all transparency, and want to move on. And so, yeah, I was like, “God, what do I do next? I can do anything that I want to do.”

Rea: So I actually just got done yesterday with the first draft of another book called The Other Year that I’m really excited about. I mean, it’s got a lot of work to be done on it, but it feels like a different book for me, and I’m excited to see where it lands.

Debbi: Fantastic. That’s good. Just keep at it.

Rea: Oh, always.

Debbi: Keep writing and keep creating. I don’t have to tell you that because you’re a writer and you’re succeeding.

Rea: Well, I appreciate you saying that, but I think it’s important for people to know; I feel like, you know, when people see other people publish, aspiring writers see authors out there and kind of assume, if you’re published, everything’s wonderful, everything’s dandy. And I have to say, because I run a business for writers, because I run a podcast that really demystifies the publishing industry and tells the truth, every book that I have put out and my experience in the publishing industry, I have lost my joy of writing with every single book.

Rea: It has just really changed. And that’s something I thought could never dampen at all. I always thought I’d have that writerly spirit. And since it’s become a business for me, and since my books have become products to sell, market and promote, the love and the creativity that I now don’t have as much time for, that’s really shifted.

Rea: So it was really special for this next book to be out of contract, to have no deadline, to not be paid for it upfront, and to realize, “Oh, I can play. I can figure out what I want to do.”

Rea: So that’s been a really interesting pause in my career, and just kind of analyzing, “What do I really want? Do I really enjoy this anymore? What comes next?” And I think it’s important to ask those questions as you go along, because you’re allowed to change your mind.

So it was really special for this next book to be out of contract, to have no deadline, to not be paid for it upfront, and to realize, “Oh, I can play. I can figure out what I want to do.”

Debbi: Yes, absolutely. You’re allowed to pivot and do other things, to use an overused expression; pivot, pivot.

Rea: Pivot.

“What do I really want? Do I really enjoy this anymore? What comes next?” And I think it’s important to ask those questions as you go along, because you’re allowed to change your mind.

Debbi: But yeah, it’s good that you’re thinking that way, because there is so much a person can do with their content, and so much you can do as an individual in this business.

Rea: A hundred percent.

Debbi: And collectively, with others. Have you ever tried collaboration, for instance?

Rea: Not on a novel. I’ve definitely thought about it and talked about it, but with my first book, I sold the movie deal before the book came out, and then the production company decided they wanted a TV series and they wanted me to write the pilot, and I was like, “Okay, great. I’m not a screenwriter, but I’ll give it a go.”So I actually collaborated with my business partner, who I also do the podcast with. He comes from the film world and we’ve collaborated on several projects that have been so fun and so outside of my comfort zone.

Rea: And when I was writing non-fiction, my first book that got published traditionally was a co-author situation. So that was really interesting. But I find the co-author dance very, very interesting. I think for fiction, it would be a little bit more challenging than non-fiction. So that’s not something I’ve broached just yet.

Debbi: I know for screenwriting, it has been very helpful for me.

Rea: For sure. A hundred percent. I love it for screenwriting. Novels though, I’m always amazed when people pair up to write fiction and just making it very seamless. That’s a really great skillset to have.

Debbi: It is. Absolutely. What is your idea of success?

Rea: Oh, I love that you asked this. So a few years ago, like most writers, it would be, “Oh, become a New York Times bestselling author, you know, hit the list.” And I have learned on this journey that, if you don’t define success upfront, and really think about it, not by society’s terms of what it means, but by what you want and what matters to you, then this is going to be a very vapid industry with a lot of disappointment.

So a few years ago, like most writers, it would be, “Oh, become a New York Times bestselling author, you know, hit the list.” And I have learned on this journey that, if you don’t define success upfront, and really think about it, not by society’s terms of what it means, but by what you want and what matters to you, then this is going to be a very vapid industry with a lot of disappointment.

Rea: So I learned early on that any sort of success, whether it’s hitting a list, getting a movie deal, having some huge thing happen, it’s momentary. And for me, success is enjoying the journey, as cliche as that sounds. I do still have some goals. My biggest goal, the pinnacle of success for me would be to see one of my books finally on screen. I really dream of that. I think that would be so cool because I’m such a visual person.

Rea: But I think, yeah, just really enjoying what I do, having more and more readers read my work, and just entertaining them. I mean, that to me, at the end of the day, is what this is all about; just reaching people, impacting people and helping inspire writers and motivate people.

Debbi: That’s fantastic. That’s as it should be. I just want to say, amen to all of that.

Rea: Right.

Debbi: Let’s see. I noticed in the podcast that I listened to that you said you haven’t hit it out of the park yet, but you do have a movie option, or an option to adapt your first novel, Not Her Daughter.

Rea: Yeah. Yeah.

Debbi: Which I thought was pretty, pretty major.

Rea: Thank you. But you know, in this industry, to have your book optioned is a wonderful thing, but a lot of times production companies will sit and sit and sit and sit.

Rea: I am hopeful. I have some maybe exciting things coming down the pipeline for another one of my books, and I’m really hopeful. But at this point in my career, I don’t hinge everything on that happening. I’m learning to be okay and to just, again, really focus on the writing and telling a good story and then letting the book find its way in the world, and not trying to control and dictate the end result. And for me, that’s been a really big shift and it allows me to enjoy what I’m doing a lot more. So if something doesn’t happen, then I can find success in other ways, and again, be flexible and adaptable and learn to pivot, as we talked about before.

I am hopeful. I have some maybe exciting things coming down the pipeline for another one of my books, and I’m really hopeful. But at this point in my career, I don’t hinge everything on that happening.

Debbi: Yes, absolutely. One of the things I always like to say is don’t raise your expectations up too high.

Rea: Yeah.

Debbi: Have a goal and make it as high as you like, but make it a goal that you want, that you really want, not that somebody else has told you you should have, and do it the way you want, not the way they keep saying.

Debbi: I mean, there’s so many people out there with so much advice about this stuff, but I thought your podcast really honed in on some truths that need to be told about the industry. I used to blog about this, but I’m kind of done with that. So I’m glad you’re carrying on that tradition.

Rea: Thank you.

Debbi: If it’s a tradition, I don’t know.

Rea: Well, it should be. The truth about publishing, everyone needs to know the truth about publishing. And again, with my business, writers come to me who want to get published and we help them usher their work into the world, whether it’s self-publishing, hybrid publishing, traditional publishing, but where we start is really figuring out what their goals actually are. What is their big “why?” Why are they doing this? What does success look like? And if we can start from that authentic place, then if they don’t hit the New York Times bestseller list, which is fleeting, which is momentary, that’s okay because we’ve built something solid that an industry can’t take away from them.

The truth about publishing, everyone needs to know the truth about publishing. And again, with my business, writers come to me who want to get published and we help them usher their work into the world, whether it’s self-publishing, hybrid publishing, traditional publishing, but where we start is really figuring out what their goals actually are. What is their big “why?” Why are they doing this?

Rea: So we spend a lot at time really diving into that, because I feel like a lot of writers just want to get published. They want to be picked, they want their books to be out there, and they don’t really think about everything that comes next. And to me, the writing is the easy part. Everything else that a writer has to be today, we don’t get to be creative, we have to be business people, we have to be marketing gurus and social media wizards. And that part of it really drives me nuts, but it’s just how it is. And I think if you go into it understanding all of it, it makes for a much smoother ride.

Debbi: Yes, absolutely. And it’s getting to the point where you have to practically be a computer expert to do this stuff.

Rea: Exactly, exactly. Yeah. I know. I wanted to be a writer so I could be behind the scenes and just be not in real clothes and not have to be on all the time if I don’t want to be. And I’m really trying to bring that back for myself. I say no to a lot of things and I’m getting off social media one platform at a time. I want to get back to being a creative because that’s what I love to do.

Debbi: Well, that’s all music to my ears. I just love it. That’s all I can say. Have you ever thought about a small press?

Rea: Yeah. My first novel actually got published when I was 22 by a total vanity press. So that’s where I learned what not to do. My expectations were so high and it was a disaster from start to finish.

Rea: So from there, I actually interned at literary agencies. I put my hands in anything and everything I could within the industry. And when I went to non-fiction, I was so burned by my fiction experience, I pivoted to non-fiction, and I got traditionally published by small presses. And I loved my experience with several small presses in particular. I loved the attention, I loved the personal attention and just that touch point that you don’t often have with the big publishers.

Rea: But when I switched back to fiction, I had not had that experience of being an author with one of the Big Five, or Big Four, I guess that it is now. So I switched, and boy, it was such a different experience.

Rea: And a lot of my authors who … At our company, Writeway, we had about 45 clients last year. 35 plus landed agents and traditional book deals, a lot of them with the big boys, and some of them have been really disappointed with their experiences because they thought it was going to be one thing and it turned out to be another, even though I was prepping them along the way of what to expect and what to ask and how to be aware and be conscious. So I think it’s just a constant learning experience. That’s a long-winded way of saying I have been with a small press and I would be very open to having that experience again.

Debbi: Yeah. I think they do more for their authors –.

Rea: Yeah.

Debbi: Yeah. Especially in genre.

Rea: Completely. Completely.

Debbi: Because you can find publishers out there who focus on that genre and really get into it and know how to sell it.

Rea: Yes. And know how to sell it. Exactly.

Debbi: Yeah. So are there any final thoughts you have before we finish up?

Rea: I mean, I would just say, I always love to just … If anyone is wanting to publish or get into this industry or is just paying attention to the stereotypes, like, “Oh, I want to be a writer, but I could never make money”, or, “Oh, I want to do this, but it’s so hard”, really do your due diligence on the industry itself. You can make money, you can get published, but you have to do the work and really understand the industry that you’re getting into.

Rea: And I think information is key. I mean, that’s what we do. That’s what I’m here for, is to kind of advocate for authors and empower them with the right information so they can make informed decisions. So I would just say to anyone listening, if you ever have questions or want to know more, just reach out, because it’s so important to understand what you’re getting into.

Debbi: This is so refreshing to hear, because I see so much BS out there, frankly.

I think information is key. I mean, that’s what we do. That’s what I’m here for, is to kind of advocate for authors and empower them with the right information so they can make informed decisions.

Rea: Yep.

Debbi: Courses; people being overcharged for all sorts of things that may or may not help their careers.

Rea: Yep.

Debbi: It’s short-term thinking, folks. You have to be in this for the long term if you’re going to do it.

Rea: Absolutely.

Debbi: And you know, when they started saying, “Oh, self-published authors are going to have to start writing five, six books a year to make any money”, I was like, “No, I can’t. Period.” That’s all there is to it. I just can’t. So yeah, you just have to be realistic about what you can and can’t do.

Rea: Yes.

Debbi: That’s the truth. That’s the God’s honest truth.

Rea: And this is a long game. You just said it. It is a long game. You don’t have to do everything all at once in these little condensed windows. It is a career which has ebbs and flows. And if you look at it like that and develop that patience, I think that that’s just the way to look at it, as a long term career.

Debbi: I agree. I agree totally. And I really appreciate your being here today, Rea.

Rea: Thank you so much. I appreciate it.

Debbi: It was great talking to you.

Rea: You as well.

Debbi: Thanks. So to all of you out there are listening and/or watching, don’t forget to check us out on Patreon. The Crime Cafe publications are among the perks offered there, along with advance ad free access to the podcast and more. So check it out.

Debbi: Our next guest in two weeks will be Sandra Wells. In the meantime, take care and happy reading.

*****

Check us out on Patreon!

PS: My only regret is that we never got around to discussing the wild animals! 🙂

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Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Rea Frey. - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks ... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Rea Frey.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, everyone. My guest today is the author of several novels, as well as the CEO and founder of Writeway, where basically you get to learn about the publishing industry before you get into this crazy business. Let's see. She lives in Nashville with her husband, daughter, and three wild animals. We'll have to talk about the wild animals too. I'm pleased introduce my guest, Rea Frey. Hi, Rea.<br /> <br /> Rea: Hello.<br /> <br /> Debbi: It's so good to have you here.<br /> <br /> Rea: It's so nice to be here. Thanks for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Sure thing. I got to say, I love your website so much. It's so clever and pretty. And I like the photo on the homepage with you holding those books that are dripping paint or something.<br /> <br /> Rea: Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I mean, it seems to be a metaphor of some kind.<br /> <br /> Rea: Yes, we could say it's a metaphor for so many different things, but yeah, it was a fun site to put together.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yeah. Yeah. It's great. It's wonderful. I like it. And I like the idea of your show, your podcast, but we'll get into that in a second.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Tell us first about your books. How would you describe your writing? Is it domestic suspense, thriller?<br /> <br /> Rea: Yeah. It's domestic suspense, which, in all honesty, when my debut novel came out, Not Her Daughter, and they told me I was in the domestic suspense genre, I was like, "What is that? What is domestic suspense?" I wasn't aiming to write in a genre, but I always like to say I write things that basically scare the shit out of parents. I love to kind of take that worst case scenario, because I'm a parent, and really play out those fears, whether it's kidnapping, a guardian dies, someone disappears. I love playing with that and playing with morality a little bit. So I'm definitely more relationship-based instead of, you know, straight thrillers, but I technically do fall in that domestic suspense category.<br /> <br /> I wasn't aiming to write in a genre, but I always like to say I write things that basically scare the shit out of parents. I love to kind of take that worst case scenario, Debbi Mack
Interview with Crime Writer Mark Edward Langley: S. 7, Ep. 6 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-mark-edward-langley-s-7-ep-6/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-mark-edward-langley-s-7-ep-6 Sun, 12 Sep 2021 04:05:56 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22124 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Mark Edward Langley. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Remember to pick that team when signing up! The full link is here: https://bit.ly/DMVDystonia Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi, everyone. Our guest today began his love of reading as an employee with B. Dalton Booksellers. Remember them? I do, fondly. He's the author of the Arthur Nakai Mystery Series which takes place in New Mexico, the only part of the Southwest I still haven't really seen to my satisfaction. I want to go back someday. Debbi: His second novel, Death Waits in the Dark, was a finalist in the American Book Fest Awards 2020 and won the Feathered Quill Award in 2021. His latest novel is When Silence Screams. Debbi: I'm pleased to have with me, author Mark Edward Langley. Debbi: Hi, Mark. It's great to see you here. Mark: Hi, good to be here. Debbi: I'm glad you're here. Thank you. Mark: Happy to be here. Debbi: Excellent. Good. First of all, I've got to say, I used to love B. Dalton Booksellers. What did you do there? Mark: Oh, Lord. You're going back to 1980, and my parents, my family, moved down there, but my dad got transferred, and it was just close by. I... "Well, I'll get a job there," and I ended up, for the time I was there, started out in the backroom, receiving the books, getting them all labeled and stickered and stuff, and putting them out. And then, got to be on the register and that kind of stuff. So, ended up stocking and work and that. And I loved being down there because it was right down the street from the Windmill Dinner Theater, and a lot of actors came through doing plays there, and a few of them actually stopped in the store to buy some stuff. Debbi: Excellent. Mark: I loved it. I loved it. But I got instilled in reading then. I was watching the Spenser for Hire series on television. And one of the ladies I worked with said, "If you love the show, you should read the books." So I started reading the books and was hooked from thereon. Debbi: Isn't it interesting how things often start with television? I know that my love of mystery started with watching Honey West way back in the day. Mark: Oh, boy. Debbi: Now I'm going back. I was watching the Spenser for Hire series on t... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Mark Edward Langley.

This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.

Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe

Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Remember to pick that team when signing up! 🙂

The full link is here: https://bit.ly/DMVDystonia

Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.

I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?

If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.

Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.

Debbi: Hi, everyone. Our guest today began his love of reading as an employee with B. Dalton Booksellers. Remember them? I do, fondly. He’s the author of the Arthur Nakai Mystery Series which takes place in New Mexico, the only part of the Southwest I still haven’t really seen to my satisfaction. I want to go back someday.

Debbi: His second novel, Death Waits in the Dark, was a finalist in the American Book Fest Awards 2020 and won the Feathered Quill Award in 2021. His latest novel is When Silence Screams.

Debbi: I’m pleased to have with me, author Mark Edward Langley.

Debbi: Hi, Mark. It’s great to see you here.

Mark: Hi, good to be here.

Debbi: I’m glad you’re here. Thank you.

Mark: Happy to be here.

Debbi: Excellent. Good. First of all, I’ve got to say, I used to love B. Dalton Booksellers. What did you do there?

Mark: Oh, Lord. You’re going back to 1980, and my parents, my family, moved down there, but my dad got transferred, and it was just close by. I… “Well, I’ll get a job there,” and I ended up, for the time I was there, started out in the backroom, receiving the books, getting them all labeled and stickered and stuff, and putting them out. And then, got to be on the register and that kind of stuff. So, ended up stocking and work and that. And I loved being down there because it was right down the street from the Windmill Dinner Theater, and a lot of actors came through doing plays there, and a few of them actually stopped in the store to buy some stuff.

Debbi: Excellent.

Mark: I loved it. I loved it. But I got instilled in reading then. I was watching the Spenser for Hire series on television. And one of the ladies I worked with said, “If you love the show, you should read the books.” So I started reading the books and was hooked from thereon.

Debbi: Isn’t it interesting how things often start with television? I know that my love of mystery started with watching Honey West way back in the day.

Mark: Oh, boy.

Debbi: Now I’m going back.

I was watching the Spenser for Hire series on television. And one of the ladies I worked with said, “If you love the show, you should read the books.”

Mark: Yeah. Oh, boy, yeah. But yeah, it’s just funny how things happen like that. And then, I got into reading Robert Parker and then Mickey Spillane and John D. MacDonald, and just went from there, and I just started loving whatever I could get my hands on.

Debbi: All great stuff. Well, tell us about Arthur Nakai. He’s an interesting character, an
ex-marine, a former member of the Special Ice Unit, and a Native American. Correct?

Mark: Exactly. Yes.

I got into reading Robert Parker and then Mickey Spillane and John D. MacDonald, and just went from there, and I just started loving whatever I could get my hands on.

Debbi: How did you come up with this character? Not to mention his wife, who’s a news reporter. And I thought that was interesting. Please tell us more.

Mark: Oh, sure. I mean, I started thinking about developing… First, I took a two-week vacation out there and I traveled the route that’s in the book. So, whatever I saw along that way, I dictated into a tape recorder and came back and transposed it all down. Then started developing characters and backstories for the characters. And I stumbled across… I wanted to be different in a lot of ways than other writers that are out there writing about that, and not as far as the police goes or whatever it may be but I developed Arthur Nakai based on my love for R. Carlos Nakai, the Native American flute player. And at the time, one of my friends where I worked a million years ago, it seems like now, whose first name was Arthur. So, I liked the way that rang together. So, I used that, developed a character with that.

First, I took a two-week vacation out there and I traveled the route that’s in the book. So, whatever I saw along that way, I dictated into a tape recorder and came back and transposed it all down. Then started developing characters and backstories for the characters.

Mark: As far as his wife, Sharon, goes, I actually was texting back and forth in the mornings with one of the local reporters on the NBC Station here in Chicago, and I wanted to ask her some questions about what do you give up to have this life you have? I wanted to make her real and things that happen in their life, once you have that job, a lot of things you don’t get to do. You miss a lot of birthdays, anniversaries, and you’re always on the air doing something. So, she helped out a lot with that. And I developed that character and the other ones like Jake Bilagody, which is loosely based on my grandfather, a large barrel-chested man, with that. So, I kind of start molding these people into what I have now.

Debbi: I think it’s really interesting the way your travels inform your fiction writing.

I actually was texting back and forth in the mornings with one of the local reporters on the NBC Station here in Chicago, and I wanted to ask her some questions about what do you give up to have this life you have? I wanted to make her real and things that happen in their life, once you have that job, a lot of things you don’t get to do.

Mark: Oh, yeah. That was the whole plan to do that because you can’t just look online and find pictures and things, and do things, and do searches. You have to be there. And that’s what I found out a long time ago. I told Anne Hillerman once that her father helped me understand the importance of descriptive sentencing, to set surrounding and set place.

Mark: I think Robert Parker helped me develop the dialogue, conversations in books. So. I use those along with that. I had to be there. You have to smell it. You have to see it. You have to taste it. You have to feel the heat, feel the cold, in order to convey that to the reader in the book. And a lot of people who have read my books feel like they’re right there in the situation, in the area. I love that.

Debbi: That’s the effect you want. Absolutely.

Mark: Yeah.

You have to feel the heat, feel the cold, in order to convey that to the reader in the book. And a lot of people who have read my books feel like they’re right there in the situation, in the area. I love that.

Debbi: And I do have to say that I love the Southwest. It’s beautiful. The area is gorgeous. It’s such a great place to set a mystery in more ways than one.

Mark: Oh, yeah. I fell in love with that when I was in my preteens, and it just stuck with me when I went back for this Path of the Dead book to take the tour out there with that. Once I got into the area and was driving through the red landscape up through Utah’s, I was home. I mean, I just… That’s the way I feel about it. I would be no more worse for wear living out there. And that’s my plan if things go as well as I hope they will, to be able to take my wife and move out there so I’m closer to it. If I have areas in the book I need to go to, hop in the truck and go there, and get the firsthand information of that. Now I can be able to talk to people out there. I talked to several Navajo people my last trip out there and got their take on a lot of things. And it’s good to be able to have that afforded you right there, to just pick up and go, be where it needs to be, meet the people and talk to them, and I just get a wealth of information.

Debbi: Yes, absolutely. I was fascinated by the way you did research on the Navajo people while you were there. It seems that your research, in a way, it really started as a happy accident, kind of like you met people, they told you things, and you sort of took it from there. Is that about right?

Once I got into the area and was driving through the red landscape up through Utah’s, I was home. I mean, I just… That’s the way I feel about it.

Mark: Exactly. The funny thing was that what began that whole journey of meeting people was, I was creating a situation in the book, in Path of the Dead. I mean, Death Waits in the Dark. Sorry. Where I had this high school student and I wanted to make sure if he lived in this certain area, would he go to this high school? So, I found somebody online that I saw who lived in Farmington and could answer my question. So, I asked her about that, and she agreed to answer it. And she said, “Yeah.” And this, we got talking back and forth and became kind of Facebook friends. And then, she was actually the one, her name was Bettina. She was the one who got me involved in meeting some people out there when I went out there, and I got to learn a lot because one of them was Arnold Clifford. And you look at the man and he’s just a regular kind of guy, and baggy pants and shirt and stringy hair. But he was the foremost geologist and botanist of the area. He gives dissertations at universities, takes university students out in the field, and talks about everything, and shows them all that.

So, I found somebody online that I saw who lived in Farmington and could answer my question. So, I asked her about that, and she agreed to answer it. … we got talking back and forth and became kind of Facebook friends. … She was the one who got me involved in meeting some people out there when I went out there …

Mark: So, I spent a day with him and the best thing was… is recording him telling me everything about the certain areas that’s in the book. So, I learned a great deal, and I refer to him several times in the second and third book. I learned a lot and will continue to do that guy. I follow him on Facebook. I learned a lot more with that. He’ll answer questions, and we’ll go back and forth. So, meeting the people like that really just opened up a whole door out there of information and friendship.

Debbi: It makes a huge difference in terms of the quality of the fiction too, I think.

Mark: Right.

Debbi: Getting to know people, talking to them, and actually experiencing the place. Totally.

Mark: Exactly.

Debbi: Let’s see. Tell us a little bit about your latest book. What’s it about?

Mark: Well, I came upon the idea of When Silence Screams by being a part on Facebook, linking up with MMIW, which is Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women organization. And every day, it seemed like, a couple of years back, I was getting notifications and flyers every day of someone going missing. It could be once, twice, three times a day. So, I decided to look into that more. I went to their website and I saw all the flyers of all the girls and women that ended up missing or were found murdered or whatever. And it struck me that when I read in 2016 alone, 5,712 girls and women went missing on the reservations in the US and Canada, that I thought, you know, that number’s a number. Well, when you see all the flyers that put a face to that number, it becomes more meaningful, more scary, more and more palatable because it puts a face to the name, all the information about that person.

I came upon the idea of When Silence Screams by being a part on Facebook, linking up with MMIW, which is Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women organization. And every day, it seemed like, a couple of years back, I was getting notifications and flyers every day of someone going missing.

Mark: And I started watching videos of the interviews with the families that are trying to deal with a missing person, that they have a daughter or son or whatever. And it just struck me that no one ever hears about this. And like a character says in the book, “When it’s a nice white girl missing off the golf course, everybody hears about it. But you have 5,712 in one year alone, and it’s not broadcast, but in the local media?” I mean, so, I don’t want to beat people over the head with it, but I don’t do information dumps on things, but I think that I want to raise awareness and that this happens. It happens daily. And that’s one of the things the Navajo people like I spoke with is I’m dealing with situations they deal with on a daily basis. So, they like the fact that I’m writing about current events out there. I’m not just making up some whimsical story about things.

Debbi: Yes, that’s great. I mean, it’s great that you’re raising this issue, making people aware of it. It’s something that I never really thought about or knew till I read your book.

Debbi: Let’s see. Right now, you’re working on your fourth novel. Is that correct?

Mark: I was doing that today. Yes, I was working on that. I’m some chapters into that. I got an idea for the fifth book. I titled that sort of the first two chapters of that one. And then, I’m also in the middle of, while doing those things, focusing on book four, for sure. But I am creating a new series in a different part of New Mexico out there with a different character and different people in that one.

Debbi: Ooh! Can you give us a hint as to what type of protagonist it is?

Mark: Well, I wanted it to be different. Again, like anybody else out there, it wasn’t going to be a Walt Longmire sheriff or a CJ Box, Joe Pickett, you know, person. So, I did a little research and found out what job out there would contain the aspects I would need to create this character. And I researched and researched, and I came upon the New Mexico Livestock Board and contacted the Deputy Director there. I had a nice long Zoom conversation with him, and he answered several questions. I emailed back and forth and got more information.

I came upon the New Mexico Livestock Board and contacted the Deputy Director there. I had a nice long Zoom conversation with him, and he answered several questions. I emailed back and forth and got more information.

Mark: So, the new character’s going to be part of that. And he’ll be… Since his previous life, what it was a New Mexico State Police Officer, there’ll be then able to work with them as well, too. So, not just stick to his district, but go and do different things.

Mark: So, it’s developing really well with that. And I’m hoping that that would be just as good because right now what I’ve got so far, I got closed case files from the Livestock Board concerning certain things. I’ve mixed a few of them together to form one storyline and hook things together. So, that’s good. I’m going to be developing that. I think it’s going to be a really good character. It’s going to be a character people are going to like too because it’s different than the others. And it has a whole new take on things out there. Just like with Arthur Nakai, and so forth, I’ve got contacts with the Phoenix Police, Santa Fe Police, Albuquerque Police.

Mark: I just got 100-page document here from University of New Mexico and their Office of Medical Investigator to go through because one of my characters in Arthur’s books is the Medical Examiner Investigator, the SDMI. So, I want to make that more real. And those case files there are to help me do that.

Debbi: I am impressed with the amount of research you do, and how much it grounds your stories.

Mark: I do an awful lot, yeah.

Debbi: I was going to say, I have a tendency to do a lot of research myself. According to your website, you have a total of nine books in the series in the works. Does that mean you have nine ideas at this point for your Arthur Nakai series? Outlines?

Mark: At that point, yeah.

Debbi: Certainly not fully written books.

Mark: But first, the first three-year are out. So, there are six, possibly seven more. I’ve already titled them. I’ve already outlined them, so I know where I’m going when I get there. But it’s amazing, and you might know as well, too, when you’re writing something, whether it be dialogue or whatever, but it’s definitely dialogue with me. If I start writing a conversation, I know where I want it to go. But then, the personalities of the characters leach into the whole thing and take me to a different place. So, I still get to where I’m going, but it fills out and it rounds out more and becomes more of a believable dialogue because they take over. They take over and their own ideas come through, their own wants and needs are there. So, I think it makes for a much better story to read. I’ve heard that from a lot of my readers that have emailed me and then put things online. They love the characters. They’re falling in love with the characters. They want to see them succeed. They’re cheering for them. They’re crying with them. So, I’m glad I can reach someone like that, and they get what I get.

Debbi: That’s excellent. That’s exactly what you want.

Mark: Yeah.

Debbi: Let’s see. I was going to ask you something about the… Oh, yeah. The series. So, do you have a plan in terms of how it’s going to end?

Mark: At this moment, I don’t think about how it’s going to end. I just keep developing storylines and titles for the books to come. And then, I’ve already researched for the fifth book. That’s in my file cabinet behind me here. It’s about an inch and a half thick so far of that.

Mark: But I like to go through and just roll with the flow and kind of see how it goes and where the thing takes me because I have ideas, I have situations, and they may pan out, they may not. The title will probably stay but the storyline may change. I’ve been told I do things backward. I create a title first and fill a story out around it. But it’s kind of like how, When Silence Screams came about, and reading those things, I decided to have that line kind of spoken by the Field Deputy Medical Examiner explaining why she does the job she does is because no one hears these girls when they’re alive but she’s the only one to hear their silent scream. To say, “Look what happened to me. Look what happened. Find it out. Figure it out. Find who did this.” So, that’s kind of where that comes from. And all the titles that I think of has a little figure around that, of what the story is going to be. And then, I do research and find out things that will complement that storyline.

I’ve been told I do things backward. I create a title first and fill a story out around it.

Debbi: Yeah. I usually ask authors what writers inspired them. And in your case, I know there were some obvious suspects like Tony Hillerman and Craig Johnson.

Mark: Right. Exactly. Yeah. I mean—

Debbi: What authors—

Mark: … Tony…

Debbi: Yeah. Go ahead.

Mark: Oh, Tony, for sure. One of the books I picked up after a Robert Parker Spencer series was some of Tony’s books, and I started reading those. So, Robert B. Parker, Tony Hillerman, John D. MacDonald, Craig, lately. I met Craig a long time ago and we message back and forth and email sometimes and get things together. But it’s one of those things where reading them… I told Anne about her dad. I says, “You know, your father taught me about the landscape.” And John D. MacDonald taught me about setting up things with the writing in general. Parker taught me about dialogue. Mickey Spillane taught me about action in a novel. And Hemingway, I think, taught me heart. I read a lot of things of all those authors, so I have… I showed Anne, too, I have the complete works of her dad in hardcover first edition.

I told Anne [Hillerman] about her dad. I says, “You know, your father taught me about the landscape.” And John D. MacDonald taught me about setting up things with the writing in general. Parker taught me about dialogue. Mickey Spillane taught me about action in a novel. And Hemingway, I think, taught me heart.

Mark: I have those. I have all of Craig’s and they’re all signed. I have all of Robert B. Parker’s. So, I have… I read them. I haven’t gotten back to them now that I’m a writer, But I read them whenever I can and I get a short time to do so.

Mark: But, yeah, they all affected me. I feel like I learned from the masters by reading and absorbing what they were doing.

Debbi: Yeah.

Mark: Robert Parker had his whole thing was Raymond Chandler. I imagine he just took all that. And that’s how Spenser came about. His dissertation in college was about all that. And they grow. You can see these writers, Tony and Robert, when their first novels came out, as they grew throughout the series, as a writer, you could tell. And things just evolved and got much better, and that’s going to happen to me and everybody else that writes. The more you do it, the more it evolves and gets better.

Debbi: That’s great. That leads right into my next question, actually. I was going to ask you what advice you would give to aspiring novelists.

Mark: Oh, boy. I think number one is, never give up on yourself. Never let somebody else tell you you can’t do that because your dream isn’t their dream, and they have no reason or know how that affects you. So, always, always go for the best. Always do it. Reach for that gold ring because it could be out there. You never know. But you don’t know unless you try.

Mark: Study as much as you can. Research, as you and I know, as much as you can about things because none of us know everything. And the more we research… I learned about things I never thought about learning about in my life before doing this. And it’s just an incredible amount of knowledge let’s you evolve.

Debbi: Absolutely.

Mark: So, the more you can do that, the more you will find out about that. And just never give up. Never, ever give up.

Debbi: That’s so true. And we learn so much from each other. Writers do. I mean, like you said—

Mark: Exactly.

Debbi: … Robert Parker started with Raymond Chandler, essentially—

Mark: Everybody—

Debbi:
… recreating him. And we all copy from each other to an extent. It’s like—

Mark: Oh, yeah.

Debbi: … part of the whole ecosystem, if you will, of writing.

Mark: That’s right. It’s like Milton Berle say he stole from everybody. You know what I mean? So, you read, you pick up, you learn things, and it formulates in your mind what you want to do and how you want to say it. You’ll say it differently. But everybody learns from predecessors. So, that’s just-

Debbi: Absolutely.

Mark: … That’s the way I feel it is.

Debbi: It’s true. It’s absolutely true. Is there anything else you’d like to add before we finish up?

Mark: Oh, just even anybody who wants to, can go to my website, markedwardlangley.com. It’s markrdwardlangly.com, one word, read about the books. All three of them are on there. You can buy them on there. You can go to any of my social media from there. Click on the icons and go to that. Learn more about the books and watch the book trailers, and see other… listen to past interviews. And there’s a whole raft, and then, don’t forget they need to go on there and join Members Only because, when you join Members Only, you will get monthly emails of things happening in my life and with the books and so forth. And occasionally, occasionally, I put in there excerpts of the new book I’m working on, so you’ll be able to catch a glimpse of what’s coming ahead.

Debbi: Fantastic. Well, thank you so much for being here today, Mark. I really, really appreciate it.

Mark: Fantastic. I love it, being here, too. Thank you very much for having me.

Debbi: Sure thing. My pleasure.

Debbi: And I would also like to thank my Patreon supporters, Ken MacClune and S. Koren. I’m putting together, very slowly, season-by-season episode guides to all the interviews that I have done on the Crime Cafe, which will be available to patrons. So, check this out on Patreon. The Crime Cafe box set and anthology come with the lowest tier contribution.

Debbi: So, our next scheduled guest will be Rea Frey. I’ll be seeing you in two weeks then. And happy reading.

*****

Don’t forget. We’re on Patreon. Please check us out there!

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Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Mark Edward Langley. - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Mark Edward Langley.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Remember to pick that team when signing up! <br /> <br /> The full link is here: https://bit.ly/DMVDystonia<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> <br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, everyone. Our guest today began his love of reading as an employee with B. Dalton Booksellers. Remember them? I do, fondly. He's the author of the Arthur Nakai Mystery Series which takes place in New Mexico, the only part of the Southwest I still haven't really seen to my satisfaction. I want to go back someday.<br /> <br /> Debbi: His second novel, Death Waits in the Dark, was a finalist in the American Book Fest Awards 2020 and won the Feathered Quill Award in 2021. His latest novel is When Silence Screams.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I'm pleased to have with me, author Mark Edward Langley.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, Mark. It's great to see you here.<br /> <br /> Mark: Hi, good to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I'm glad you're here. Thank you.<br /> <br /> Mark: Happy to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Excellent. Good. First of all, I've got to say, I used to love B. Dalton Booksellers. What did you do there?<br /> <br /> Mark: Oh, Lord. You're going back to 1980, and my parents, my family, moved down there, but my dad got transferred, and it was just close by. I... "Well, I'll get a job there," and I ended up, for the time I was there, started out in the backroom, receiving the books, getting them all labeled and stickered and stuff, and putting them out. And then, got to be on the register and that kind of stuff. So, ended up stocking and work and that. And I loved being down there because it was right down the street from the Windmill Dinner Theater, and a lot of actors came through doing plays there, and a few of them actually stopped in the store to buy some stuff.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Excellent.<br /> <br /> Mark: I loved it. I loved it. But I got instilled in reading then. I was watching the Spenser for Hire series on television. And one of the ladies I worked with said, "If you love the show, you should read the books." So I started reading the books and was hooked from thereon.<br /> Debbi Mack 26:32
Interview with Crime Writer Samantha Downing: S. 7, Ep. 5 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-samantha-downing-s-7-ep-5/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-samantha-downing-s-7-ep-5 Sun, 29 Aug 2021 04:05:48 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22081 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Samantha Downing. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Remember to pick that team when signing up! The full link is here: https://bit.ly/DMVDystonia Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi, everyone. Our guest today recently released her third novel. It's called FOR YOUR OWN GOOD, and has been optioned by a production company to be adapted into, I suppose, an HBO Max series. We'll have to talk about that to the extent it can be talked about. Her first novel, MY LOVELY WIFE, has been nominated for multiple awards, and is also under option to be adapted for the screen. She lives and works in New Orleans, a place that I've always wanted to visit, but have not gotten around to yet. I am pleased to have with me Samantha Downing. Hi Sam, how are you doing today? Samantha: I'm good. Thank you for having me. Debbi: Well, thank you for being here. I really, really appreciate it. The setting of your latest book reminds me of an interview I just did with another author who was an educator. And her comment to me was that she was surprised that more authors didn't set their books in schools because they're like microcosms of society. And my thought was it's like a small town. What are your thoughts on that? Samantha: Absolutely. I think there's a... In this book, in FOR YOUR OWN GOOD, there's a number of social structures that exist within the school. There is the structure between the teachers themselves. This is a private school where the kids are all wealthy. The parents pay the bills. And some of the teachers are wealthy, some of them are not. And there is a structure between the parents and the teachers. The parents pay the bills and are the donors to the school, so they think they can tell the teachers what to do. And then there are the students who drive better cars than the teachers. So, the money and the wealth and the entitlement has a lot to do with the story itself. The protagonist, or one of the main characters, is Teddy Crutcher, who is not wealthy and lives on a teacher's salary, and that is something that really drives him and his actions in the book. In this book, in FOR YOUR OWN GOOD, there's a number of social structures that exist within the school. Debbi: I was going to say, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Samantha Downing. - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Samantha Downing.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Remember to pick that team when signing up! <br /> <br /> The full link is here: https://bit.ly/DMVDystonia<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> <br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here’s a link to a PDF copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, everyone. Our guest today recently released her third novel. It's called FOR YOUR OWN GOOD, and has been optioned by a production company to be adapted into, I suppose, an HBO Max series. We'll have to talk about that to the extent it can be talked about. Her first novel, MY LOVELY WIFE, has been nominated for multiple awards, and is also under option to be adapted for the screen. She lives and works in New Orleans, a place that I've always wanted to visit, but have not gotten around to yet. I am pleased to have with me Samantha Downing. Hi Sam, how are you doing today?<br /> <br /> Samantha: I'm good. Thank you for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Well, thank you for being here. I really, really appreciate it. The setting of your latest book reminds me of an interview I just did with another author who was an educator. And her comment to me was that she was surprised that more authors didn't set their books in schools because they're like microcosms of society. And my thought was it's like a small town. What are your thoughts on that?<br /> <br /> Samantha: Absolutely. I think there's a... In this book, in FOR YOUR OWN GOOD, there's a number of social structures that exist within the school. There is the structure between the teachers themselves. This is a private school where the kids are all wealthy. The parents pay the bills. And some of the teachers are wealthy, some of them are not. And there is a structure between the parents and the teachers. The parents pay the bills and are the donors to the school, so they think they can tell the teachers what to do. And then there are the students who drive better cars than the teachers. So, the money and the wealth and the entitlement has a lot to do with the story itself. The protagonist, or one of the main characters, is Teddy Crutcher, who is not wealthy and lives on a teacher's salary, and that is something that really drives him and his actions in the bo... Debbi Mack 19:18 Interview with Crime Writer Saralyn Richard: S. 7, Ep. 4 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-saralyn-richard-s-7-ep-4/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-saralyn-richard-s-7-ep-4 Sun, 15 Aug 2021 04:05:17 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=22024 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Saralyn Richard. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Remember to pick that team when signing up! The full link is here: https://bit.ly/DMVDystonia Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here's a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi everyone. Today, making her second visit to the show, is the author of the Detective Oliver Parrott mysteries and other books that we'll be discussing. She's a former educator who's written for children and adults. It's my pleasure to have with me, Saralyn Richard. Hi Saralyn, I'm really happy to see you again. Saralyn: Thank you, Debbi. And thanks for having me on your show. Debbi: Sure thing. And by the way, as Fernando would say, you look marvelous darling. You do indeed. I am almost finished with your second Oliver Parrott book. Will you be writing more of those? Saralyn: I am currently writing the third Oliver Parrott book. Debbi: Excellent. Saralyn: Yes, he is still whispering in my ear. So as long as he continues to do that, I'll be recording what he's telling me. Debbi: Can you give us a hint as to what the book is about? Saralyn: Well, it's also set in Brandywine Valley and the working title for the book is INHERITANCE BLUES and it has to do with a meth lab and a Ponzi scheme and a really famous old lady whose children have interest in what they're going to inherit from her. And I think it's going to all come together in a really interesting book. Debbi: Sounds interesting. Saralyn: So, I've just started with it. It's just in the very beginning stages. I think I've written two chapters. Debbi: Sounds fascinating. Saralyn: Thanks. Debbi: In the latest novel, I noticed that Oliver's wife, Tonya, makes an appearance and she has served with the military and come back from deployment and has PTSD. Did you do a lot of research on that topic? Saralyn: Yes, I did. And Tonya was an important character in the first book as well, but she was still doing her tour of duty in Afghanistan. So she couldn't be as big of a part of the picture as she was in A PALETTE FOR LOVE AND MURDER. There, she's really right up there with the main characters and her PTSD takes front and center spot and becomes a big part of the plot. So I don't know how far along you are, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Saralyn Richard. - This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Saralyn Richard.<br /> <br /> This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Remember to pick that team when signing up! <br /> <br /> The full link is here: https://bit.ly/DMVDystonia<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’m a Blubrry affiliate, but that’s not the only reason I’m telling you this. I’ve been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you’re in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract, and it’s just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn’t that nice?<br /> <br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here's a link to a PDF copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. Today, making her second visit to the show, is the author of the Detective Oliver Parrott mysteries and other books that we'll be discussing. She's a former educator who's written for children and adults. It's my pleasure to have with me, Saralyn Richard. Hi Saralyn, I'm really happy to see you again.<br /> <br /> Saralyn: Thank you, Debbi. And thanks for having me on your show.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Sure thing. And by the way, as Fernando would say, you look marvelous darling. You do indeed. I am almost finished with your second Oliver Parrott book. Will you be writing more of those?<br /> <br /> Saralyn: I am currently writing the third Oliver Parrott book.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Excellent.<br /> <br /> Saralyn: Yes, he is still whispering in my ear. So as long as he continues to do that, I'll be recording what he's telling me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Can you give us a hint as to what the book is about?<br /> <br /> Saralyn: Well, it's also set in Brandywine Valley and the working title for the book is INHERITANCE BLUES and it has to do with a meth lab and a Ponzi scheme and a really famous old lady whose children have interest in what they're going to inherit from her. And I think it's going to all come together in a really interesting book.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Sounds interesting.<br /> <br /> Saralyn: So, I've just started with it. It's just in the very beginning stages. I think I've written two chapters.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Sounds fascinating.<br /> <br /> Saralyn: Thanks.<br /> <br /> Debbi: In the latest novel, I noticed that Oliver's wife, Tonya, makes an appearance and she has served with the military and come back from deployment and has PTSD. Did you do a lot of research on that topic?<br /> <br /> Saralyn: Yes, I did. And Tonya was an important character in the first book as well, but she was still doing her tour of duty in Afghanistan. Debbi Mack 20:20 Interview with Crime Writer Thomas O’Callaghan: S. 7, Ep. 3 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-thomas-ocallaghan-s-7-ep-3/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-thomas-ocallaghan-s-7-ep-3 Sun, 01 Aug 2021 04:05:54 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=21951 Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction writer Thomas O'Callaghan. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Remember to pick that team when signing up! :) Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I'm a Blubrry affiliate, but that's not the only reason I'm telling you this. I've been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it's one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you're in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it's a company that I can get behind 100% and say, "You should try this." Try Blubrry. It doesn't require a long-term contract, and it's just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn't that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog. Here's a downloadable copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi, again, everyone. Today, I have as my guest, the author of a series of thrillers featuring a New York City detective, Lt. John Driscoll. His work has been translated for publication in at least six countries outside the US. He's also a native New Yorker, so that's a plus because so am I. I'm pleased to have with me today, Thomas O'Callaghan. Hi, Thomas. Thomas: Hello, Debbi. Debbi: I'm so glad you're here today. Thomas: Yeah, nice to be here. Very nice to be here. Debbi: Awesome. I love your bookshelf there in the background. It's so neat and beautiful. Thomas: Thank you very much. Debbi: I wish my shelves were so beautiful. Thomas: Thank you. Debbi: What prompted you to write this series? Thomas: Interesting question. I never thought of writing. In college, I studied history and planned on perhaps going to law school. After that, I began working for an insurance company, Allstate Insurance Company, and I had a pretty good career with them, sales agent. Everything was going well and I figured I'd retire as a sales agent, only I didn't think I'd retire at the age of 49. They changed the way they paid us, and if I wanted to stay on, it meant I was no longer an employee, but I was a franchise agent and I had to pay for secretarial help and other support staff and whatnot. The option was to sell my book of business and leave or retire or stay on as a franchise, so I sold my book of business, and that carried me for about three years. Thomas: But at age 49, I needed something to do. I spoke to a friend of mine who had a similar circumstance. She asked me what did I like to do. If you're going to have a second career, it might be something you might like doing. I said, "Well, I like to take photographs." This was before the advent of the old iPhone. I had an old 35-millimeter camera and I went out and I snapped some pictures. I lived near Prospect Park in Brooklyn at the time and I snapped some pictures and I enjoyed it. Thomas: The enthusiasm waned after about a month and I said to her, I said, "Well, it's not a career choice." She said, "Well, what else do you like to do?" I said, "Well, to be honest with you, I always thought I'd be an actor." I wanted to be a thespian when I was in high school and in college and I performed in theater groups and I did some off-Broadway shows. I said, "That's what I'd like to do," so she recommended I go down and have some training because it had been a while and I went to HB Studios down in Manhattan and that was fun, two months working with a group of other actors and some professional trainers. Thomas: I enjoyed it very much, but again, Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction writer Thomas O'Callaghan. - Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe - Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction writer Thomas O'Callaghan.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Please join my fundraising team, DMV Dystonia, to raise funds for research on this rare movement disorder. Remember to pick that team when signing up! :)<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I'm a Blubrry affiliate, but that's not the only reason I'm telling you this. I've been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it's one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you're in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it's a company that I can get behind 100% and say, "You should try this." Try Blubrry. It doesn't require a long-term contract, and it's just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn't that nice?<br /> <br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I’ve included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Here's a downloadable copy of the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, again, everyone. Today, I have as my guest, the author of a series of thrillers featuring a New York City detective, Lt. John Driscoll. His work has been translated for publication in at least six countries outside the US. He's also a native New Yorker, so that's a plus because so am I. I'm pleased to have with me today, Thomas O'Callaghan. Hi, Thomas.<br /> <br /> Thomas: Hello, Debbi.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I'm so glad you're here today.<br /> <br /> Thomas: Yeah, nice to be here. Very nice to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Awesome. I love your bookshelf there in the background. It's so neat and beautiful.<br /> <br /> Thomas: Thank you very much.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I wish my shelves were so beautiful.<br /> <br /> Thomas: Thank you.<br /> <br /> Debbi: What prompted you to write this series?<br /> <br /> Thomas: Interesting question. I never thought of writing. In college, I studied history and planned on perhaps going to law school. After that, I began working for an insurance company, Allstate Insurance Company, and I had a pretty good career with them, sales agent. Everything was going well and I figured I'd retire as a sales agent, only I didn't think I'd retire at the age of 49. They changed the way they paid us, and if I wanted to stay on, it meant I was no longer an employee, but I was a franchise agent and I had to pay for secretarial help and other support staff and whatnot. The option was to sell my book of business and leave or retire or stay on as a franchise, so I sold my book of business, and that carried me for about three years.<br /> <br /> Thomas: But at age 49, I needed something to do. I spoke to a friend of mine who had a similar circumstance. She asked me what did I like to do. If you're going to have a second career, it might be something you might like doing. I said, "Well, I like to take photographs." This was before the advent of the old iPhone. I had an old 35-millimeter camera and I went out and I snapped some pictures. I lived near Prospect Park in Brooklyn at the time and I snapped some pictures and I enjoyed it.<br /> <br /> Thomas: The enthusiasm waned after about a month and I said to her, I said, "Well, it's not a career choice." She said, "Well, what else do you like to do?" I said, "Well, to be honest with you, I always thought I'd be an actor." I wanted to be a thespian when I was in high school and in college and I performed in theater groups and I did some off-Broadway shows. I said, "That's what I'd like to do, Debbi Mack 38:32 Interview with Crime Writer Clay Stafford: S. 7, Ep. 2 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-clay-stafford-s-7-ep-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-clay-stafford-s-7-ep-2 Sun, 18 Jul 2021 04:05:51 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=21890 Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction writer Clay Stafford. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first I'd like to put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I'm a Bluburry podcasting affiliate, but that's not the only reason I'm telling you about this. I've been using Blubrry podcasting as my host for the podcast for years and it's one of the best decisions I've ever made. They provide great service. You can run your podcast from your website. They provide fantastic distribution at a reasonable price. That's why it's a company I can get behind one hundred percent and say, "You should try this." If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. It doesn't require a long-term contract. It's just a great company, and they provide great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I've included an affiliate link on this blog. Unfortunately, our scheduled guest had to cancel. However, I was lucky enough to have someone else waiting in the wings. :) FYI, this post includes an affiliate link or two. Debbi: Hi, everyone. Today's guest is uniquely accomplished, to say the least. He is, and I quote from his bio, "an author, screenwriter, playwright, producer, director, actor, showrunner, publisher, songwriter/composer, CEO, educator, speaker, and needless to say, entrepreneur." He is also founder, CEO, and president of the Killer Nashville Conference for writers. He's done numerous things we can discuss, actually. And it's my great pleasure to introduce Clay Stafford. Hi Clay. I'm so glad you're here today. Clay: Well, hey, Debbi. And all of that only says that I am very old. That's what it comes down to. Right? Debbi: But you have done so much with that time. Clay: Well, thanks. Thanks. You know I started as a kid actor. Did you know that? Debbi: I was going to ask how you got started. How did you get started? Clay: Yeah. I started actually working professionally when I was 10, and so have been in the business ever since then. Worked and then formed my first production company when I was 16 years old, and started doing commercials for banks and other things. And so everything kind of went from there. Debbi: Wow, that's really impressive. What led you to a life of literary crime? Clay: First of all, I love all literature. I'm incredibly eclectic. I love the classics. I love ... The only thing I say that really just pushes me too far is romance when we get into the shower scenes, and everybody always hears me talking about the shower scene. Can't stand the shower scenes, but I can skip that. Romantic suspense, I love. So I just love everything, and when we founded ... I guess we're going to talk a little bit about Killer Nashville, the conference. Right? First of all, I love all literature. I'm incredibly eclectic. I love the classics. Debbi: For sure. Clay: When I founded Killer Nashville, it was, as you can see, based on stories that contained elements of mystery, thriller, suspense. And to me, I think no matter if you're writing literary, if you're writing straight crime noir, if you're writing science fiction, those elements actually are propelling the story forward and keep the reader's interest. I know we have the genre of mystery and crime, but you can do that in multiple--historical, sci-fi, fantasy--ways, and still impose the same elements on there of the storytelling. I think no matter if you're writing literary, if you're writing straight crime noir, if you're writing science fiction, those elements actually are propelling the story forward and keep the reader's interest. Clay: So as long as it's got that, which to me tells me that the story's moving forward, I'm all in. So it doesn't really matter about the genre itself. So how did I get involved with crime? Well, that's just the Michael Jackson song, just another side of me. So that's just part of one of the techniques where the mystery, thriller, Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction writer Clay Stafford. - Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe - Debbi (00:54): But first I'd like to put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. - I'm a Bluburry podcasting affiliate, Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction writer Clay Stafford.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first I'd like to put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I'm a Bluburry podcasting affiliate, but that's not the only reason I'm telling you about this. I've been using Blubrry podcasting as my host for the podcast for years and it's one of the best decisions I've ever made. They provide great service. You can run your podcast from your website. They provide fantastic distribution at a reasonable price. That's why it's a company I can get behind one hundred percent and say, "You should try this." <br /> <br /> If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. It doesn't require a long-term contract. It's just a great company, and they provide great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I've included an affiliate link on this blog.<br /> <br /> Unfortunately, our scheduled guest had to cancel. However, I was lucky enough to have someone else waiting in the wings. :)<br /> <br /> FYI, this post includes an affiliate link or two.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, everyone. Today's guest is uniquely accomplished, to say the least. He is, and I quote from his bio, "an author, screenwriter, playwright, producer, director, actor, showrunner, publisher, songwriter/composer, CEO, educator, speaker, and needless to say, entrepreneur." He is also founder, CEO, and president of the Killer Nashville Conference for writers. He's done numerous things we can discuss, actually. And it's my great pleasure to introduce Clay Stafford. Hi Clay. I'm so glad you're here today.<br /> <br /> Clay: Well, hey, Debbi. And all of that only says that I am very old. That's what it comes down to. Right?<br /> <br /> Debbi: But you have done so much with that time.<br /> <br /> Clay: Well, thanks. Thanks. You know I started as a kid actor. Did you know that?<br /> <br /> Debbi: I was going to ask how you got started. How did you get started?<br /> <br /> Clay: Yeah. I started actually working professionally when I was 10, and so have been in the business ever since then. Worked and then formed my first production company when I was 16 years old, and started doing commercials for banks and other things. And so everything kind of went from there.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Wow, that's really impressive. What led you to a life of literary crime?<br /> <br /> Clay: First of all, I love all literature. I'm incredibly eclectic. I love the classics. I love ... The only thing I say that really just pushes me too far is romance when we get into the shower scenes, and everybody always hears me talking about the shower scene. Can't stand the shower scenes, but I can skip that. Romantic suspense, I love. So I just love everything, and when we founded ... I guess we're going to talk a little bit about Killer Nashville, the conference. Right?<br /> <br /> First of all, I love all literature. I'm incredibly eclectic. I love the classics.<br /> <br /> Debbi: For sure.<br /> <br /> Clay: When I founded Killer Nashville, it was, as you can see, based on stories that contained elements of mystery, thriller, suspense. And to me, I think no matter if you're writing literary, if you're writing straight crime noir, if you're writing science fiction, those elements actually are propelling the story forward and keep the reader's interest. I know we have the genre of mystery and crime, but you can do that in multiple--historical, sci-fi, fantasy--ways, and still impose the same elements on there of the storytelling.<br /> <br /> I think no matter if you're writing literary, if you're writing straight crime noir, if you're writing science fiction, those elements actually are propelling the story forward and keep the reader's interest.<br /> <br /> Clay: So as long as it's got that, which to me tells me that the story's moving forward, Debbi Mack 36:16 Interview with Crime Writer Richard Meredith: S. 7, Ep. 1 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-richard-meredith-s7-ep1/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-richard-meredith-s7-ep1 Sun, 04 Jul 2021 04:05:55 +0000 https://www.debbimack.com/?p=21802 Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction writer, Richard Meredith. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You’re in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Blubrry and distribution through your website. So it’s a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract. It’s just a great company, period. And I am a Blubrry affiliate. So there’s that. Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I’ll say no more. Debbi: Hi everyone. We're back for a seventh season of the podcast, which just blows me away. I mean time flies, man. I can't believe I've been doing this for six years. Anyway, as always, I'm blown away also by the variety of backgrounds that people bring into the writing craft. And my first guest for this season is no exception. He has a background in biology. He's worked as a marine scientist and wildlife biologist for the federal government and the private sector. He has also worked on commercial fishing boats. My guest today is author Richard Meredith. Hi, Richard. Thanks so much for being here today. Richard: Hi, Debbi. Thank you very much for having me. It's a real honor to be with Crime Cafe. And I also want to thank you for posting my guest blog on your website. That was wonderful. Debbi: Oh, my pleasure to do so. Like I said, you have a very interesting background. What was it you did on commercial fishing boats? Richard: Well, this may be before your time, but there was during the '70s, there was this controversy about the tuna dolphin controversy where the fishing boats were catching the dolphin and so I was one of the government monitors on those boats. So I did that for about two years. Debbi: That isn't before my time, by the way. Richard: And I did that for a couple of years. And then my wife said the next job that comes in on the beach, take it. That was in Kansas City. So I got pretty far from the ocean after that. Debbi: Well, that's very interesting. I used to work at EPA actually. So I was going to ask you if you did environmental protection. Richard: Yeah, I was at the Corps of Engineers and we worked with EPA quite a bit. Yeah. Debbi: Very good, excellent, wonderful. All that Clean Water Act stuff. Richard: Yeah, exactly. Debbi: There you go. Had you written any fiction before you wrote The Crow's Nest? Richard: I wrote a novel called Sky Dance, which was about my experience. Well, it's a novel, but it was based on my experiences in Ecuador when I was working on doing environmental impact studies on petroleum projects down there. And that was self published. I did it through CreateSpace with Amazon. But this was the first one that was published by a publisher. Debbi: I see. So is this the first in a series or is this a standalone? Richard: This is a standalone. Yeah. My next three that are still, well, I'm trying to find a publisher, but they're a series. Yeah. Debbi: Tell us a little about The Crow's Nest. What's it about? Richard: Well, I say that The Crow's Nest is a crime thriller without police, federal agents, or the military. It's just two men seeking justice against a brutal cartel. It's unique so far in that I think it's the only novel about the use of the crude submarines in the smuggling of cocaine between Columbia and Northern Mexico. I describe it as the mutant spawn of Das Boot and S... Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction writer, Richard Meredith. - Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe - Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. - Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction writer, Richard Meredith.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You’re in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Blubrry and distribution through your website. So it’s a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract. It’s just a great company, period. And I am a Blubrry affiliate. So there’s that.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I’ll say no more.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. We're back for a seventh season of the podcast, which just blows me away. I mean time flies, man. I can't believe I've been doing this for six years. Anyway, as always, I'm blown away also by the variety of backgrounds that people bring into the writing craft. And my first guest for this season is no exception. He has a background in biology. He's worked as a marine scientist and wildlife biologist for the federal government and the private sector. He has also worked on commercial fishing boats. My guest today is author Richard Meredith. Hi, Richard. Thanks so much for being here today.<br /> <br /> Richard: Hi, Debbi. Thank you very much for having me. It's a real honor to be with Crime Cafe. And I also want to thank you for posting my guest blog on your website. That was wonderful.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Oh, my pleasure to do so. Like I said, you have a very interesting background. What was it you did on commercial fishing boats?<br /> <br /> Richard: Well, this may be before your time, but there was during the '70s, there was this controversy about the tuna dolphin controversy where the fishing boats were catching the dolphin and so I was one of the government monitors on those boats. So I did that for about two years.<br /> <br /> Debbi: That isn't before my time, by the way.<br /> <br /> Richard: And I did that for a couple of years. And then my wife said the next job that comes in on the beach, take it. That was in Kansas City. So I got pretty far from the ocean after that.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Well, that's very interesting. I used to work at EPA actually. So I was going to ask you if you did environmental protection.<br /> <br /> Richard: Yeah, I was at the Corps of Engineers and we worked with EPA quite a bit. Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Very good, excellent, wonderful. All that Clean Water Act stuff.<br /> <br /> Richard: Yeah, exactly.<br /> <br /> Debbi: There you go. Had you written any fiction before you wrote The Crow's Nest?<br /> <br /> Richard: I wrote a novel called Sky Dance, which was about my experience. Well, it's a novel, but it was based on my experiences in Ecuador when I was working on doing environmental impact studies on petroleum projects down there. And that was self published. I did it through CreateSpace with Amazon. But this was the first one that was published by a publisher.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I see. So is this the first in a series or is this a standalone?<br /> <br /> Richard: This is a standalone. Yeah. My next three that are still, well, I'm trying to find a publisher, but they're a series. Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Tell us a little about The Crow's Nest. What's it about?<br /> <br /> Richard: Well, I say that The Crow's Nest is a crime thriller without police, federal agents, or the military. Debbi Mack 22:08 Interview with IP Attorney Kathryn Goldman: S. 6, Ep. 21 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-ip-attorney-kathryn-goldman-s-6-ep-21/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-ip-attorney-kathryn-goldman-s-6-ep-21 Sun, 11 Apr 2021 04:05:20 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21547 Debbi Mack interviews intellectual property attorney Kathryn Goldman on the Crime Cafe podcast. Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You’re in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Blubrry and distribution through your website. So it’s a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract. It’s just a great company, period. And I am a Blubrry affiliate. So there’s that. Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I’ll say no more. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. It’s a miracle! Click here to download a copy in PDF. And check us out on Patreon. Debbi (00:12): Hi, everyone! Today I have as my guest a person of great value to writers and other creators, an intellectual property attorney. Her particular interest is in protecting online content and representing writers, artists, photographers, and other businesses who have an online presence. She is editor of the legal blog, Creative Law Center, which I can tell you is a must-read for writers, artists and other creative people. And in the interest of full disclosure, both of us attended law school at the University of Maryland School of Law and graduated in 1987. So, yay Maryland! It's a pleasure to introduce our guest today, Kathryn Goldman. Hi, Kathryn. So good to see you. Kathryn (03:19): Thank you for having me, Debbi. How are you today? Debbi (03:23): I'm fine. Thank you. How are you doing? Kathryn (03:25): Good. Good. It's a beautiful day outside. Debbi (03:28): Wonderful. A little chilly, but that's okay. We'll bear with it. You know, April will improve as time goes by. Let's see. Let's talk first about the CASE Act. Now, what is the CASE Act? And what are the benefits for indie authors and publishers? Kathryn (03:48): So the CASE Act is the Copyright Alternative in Small Claims Enforcement Act: CASE. That's what that stands for. And it was passed at the end of last year. It's been bouncing around in Washington for a lot of years now and it's finally gotten passed. And what it does is it gives any copyright holder the ability to enforce their rights in a small claims tribunal. The Copyright Office is going to set up the Copyright Claims Board. And so you will be able to file a claim against someone if your work is being infringed. And you don't have to go into federal court, which can be extraordinarily expensive. So this is really, really beneficial for indie authors and small businesses, small publishers, and creatives to enforce their rights. So the CASE Act is the Copyright Alternative in Small Claims Enforcement Act: CASE. That's what that stands for. And it was passed at the end of last year. It's been bouncing around in Washington for a lot of years now and it's finally gotten passed. And what it does is it gives any copyright holder the ability to enforce their rights in a small claims tribunal. Debbi (04:57): Now, the scope of this act covers anything that can be copyrighted, correct? Kathryn (05:02): That's right. If you have a copyright registration on your creative work, you can go and enforce your rights at the Copyright Claims Board and the types of claims that the board will hear are infringement claims and claims of abuse under the DMCA. Are you familiar with the DMCA? Debbi (05:32): I know of it. Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Correct? Kathryn (05:35): Correct. Correct. Debbi Mack interviews intellectual property attorney Kathryn Goldman on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. - I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast... Debbi Mack interviews intellectual property attorney Kathryn Goldman on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You’re in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Blubrry and distribution through your website. So it’s a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract. It’s just a great company, period. And I am a Blubrry affiliate. So there’s that.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I’ll say no more.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. It’s a miracle! Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> And check us out on Patreon.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:12): Hi, everyone! Today I have as my guest a person of great value to writers and other creators, an intellectual property attorney. Her particular interest is in protecting online content and representing writers, artists, photographers, and other businesses who have an online presence. She is editor of the legal blog, Creative Law Center, which I can tell you is a must-read for writers, artists and other creative people. And in the interest of full disclosure, both of us attended law school at the University of Maryland School of Law and graduated in 1987. So, yay Maryland! It's a pleasure to introduce our guest today, Kathryn Goldman. Hi, Kathryn. So good to see you.<br /> <br /> Kathryn (03:19): Thank you for having me, Debbi. How are you today?<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:23): I'm fine. Thank you. How are you doing?<br /> <br /> Kathryn (03:25): Good. Good. It's a beautiful day outside.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:28): Wonderful. A little chilly, but that's okay. We'll bear with it. You know, April will improve as time goes by. Let's see. Let's talk first about the CASE Act. Now, what is the CASE Act? And what are the benefits for indie authors and publishers?<br /> <br /> Kathryn (03:48): So the CASE Act is the Copyright Alternative in Small Claims Enforcement Act: CASE. That's what that stands for. And it was passed at the end of last year. It's been bouncing around in Washington for a lot of years now and it's finally gotten passed. And what it does is it gives any copyright holder the ability to enforce their rights in a small claims tribunal. The Copyright Office is going to set up the Copyright Claims Board. And so you will be able to file a claim against someone if your work is being infringed. And you don't have to go into federal court, which can be extraordinarily expensive. So this is really, really beneficial for indie authors and small businesses, small publishers, and creatives to enforce their rights.<br /> <br /> So the CASE Act is the Copyright Alternative in Small Claims Enforcement Act: CASE. That's what that stands for. And it was passed at the end of last year. It's been bouncing around in Washington for a lot of years now and it's finally gotten passed. And what it does is it gives any copyright holder the ability to enforce their rights in a small claims tribunal.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:57): Now, the scope of this act covers anything that can be copyrighted, correct?<br /> <br /> Kathryn (05:02): That's right. If you have a copyright registration on your creative work, you can go and enforce your rights at the Copyright Claims Board and the types of claims that the board will hear are infringement claims a... Debbi Mack 36:41 Interview with Crime Writer Daniella Bernett: S. 6, Ep. 20 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-daniella-bernett-s-6-ep-20/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-daniella-bernett-s-6-ep-20 Sun, 28 Mar 2021 04:05:15 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21472 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Daniella Bernett on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You’re in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Blubrry and distribution through your website. So it’s a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract. It’s just a great company, period. And I am a Blubrry affiliate. So there’s that. Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I’ll say no more. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. It’s a miracle! Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (02:25): Hi everyone. Today we have another author making a repeat appearance on the podcast. Her mystery series now includes her sixth novel Old Sins Never Die. You can find my own review of the book on my blog as well as on GoodReads and so forth. I gave it five stars, by the way. So check it out. It's a pleasure to welcome back the very talented writer, Daniella Burnett. Hi Daniella. Daniella (03:00): Hi Debbi. It's always nice to come back And speak to you about mysteries and books and all sorts of things. So I thank you for having me back again. Debbi (03:06): Well, it's a pleasure, believe me. And I enjoyed your book very, very much. Daniella (03:12): Oh, thank you. That's very gratifying. I always like hearing that. I never get tired of that. Debbi (03:17): Somehow that seems to be a common trait of authors. I can't imagine why. Even though technically you write the Emmeline Kirby-Gregory Longdon series, do you tend to think of Emmeline as being really the main protagonist? Daniella (03:38): Well, she tends to get into more of the trouble, but I think I view them as equal protagonists because they both bring different aspects to solving the crime and ensuring that the criminal is caught. So I think it's an equal between the two of them. Debbi (03:58): That's good. Actually, I like that. Yeah, because Gregory certainly has a complicated backstory of his own. Daniella (04:08): Oh, he does. But that makes him interesting. Debbi (04:11): Very, very interesting. Apart from the investigatory role of journalists generally, was there a reason that you chose journalism as her profession? Daniella (04:26): Well, as you said, it's a way ... she's not a professional sleuth, but journalists have that inherent need to find out the truth, to make sure in cases of a crime to make sure that justice is served. So that was, I didn't want to have a police officer, but I wanted someone who had a similar type of role. So, that seemed like the perfect career for my protagonist when I was envisioning the series. Plus, I studied journalism. So, you know, I had a little bit of familiarity with that, that whole skill, that whole so forth. So that's why I thought a journalist would be an ideal protagonist. I didn't want to have a police officer, but I wanted someone who had a similar type of role. So, that seemed like the perfect career for my protagonist when I was envisioning the series. Plus, I studied journalism. So, you know, I had a little bit of familiarity with that, that whole skill, that whole so forth. Debbi (05:17): Yeah, I can, I can understand that as I have a journalism background myself. Understanding that type of mindset. The need to find out the truth, the desire to express it. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Daniella Bernett on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe - Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. - Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Daniella Bernett on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You’re in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Blubrry and distribution through your website. So it’s a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract. It’s just a great company, period. And I am a Blubrry affiliate. So there’s that.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I’ll say no more.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. It’s a miracle! Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (02:25): Hi everyone. Today we have another author making a repeat appearance on the podcast. Her mystery series now includes her sixth novel Old Sins Never Die. You can find my own review of the book on my blog as well as on GoodReads and so forth. I gave it five stars, by the way. So check it out. It's a pleasure to welcome back the very talented writer, Daniella Burnett. Hi Daniella.<br /> <br /> Daniella (03:00): Hi Debbi. It's always nice to come back And speak to you about mysteries and books and all sorts of things. So I thank you for having me back again.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:06): Well, it's a pleasure, believe me. And I enjoyed your book very, very much.<br /> <br /> Daniella (03:12): Oh, thank you. That's very gratifying. I always like hearing that. I never get tired of that.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:17): Somehow that seems to be a common trait of authors. I can't imagine why. Even though technically you write the Emmeline Kirby-Gregory Longdon series, do you tend to think of Emmeline as being really the main protagonist?<br /> <br /> Daniella (03:38): Well, she tends to get into more of the trouble, but I think I view them as equal protagonists because they both bring different aspects to solving the crime and ensuring that the criminal is caught. So I think it's an equal between the two of them.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:58): That's good. Actually, I like that. Yeah, because Gregory certainly has a complicated backstory of his own.<br /> <br /> Daniella (04:08): Oh, he does. But that makes him interesting.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:11): Very, very interesting. Apart from the investigatory role of journalists generally, was there a reason that you chose journalism as her profession?<br /> <br /> Daniella (04:26): Well, as you said, it's a way ... she's not a professional sleuth, but journalists have that inherent need to find out the truth, to make sure in cases of a crime to make sure that justice is served. So that was, I didn't want to have a police officer, but I wanted someone who had a similar type of role. So, that seemed like the perfect career for my protagonist when I was envisioning the series. Plus, I studied journalism. So, you know, I had a little bit of familiarity with that, that whole skill, that whole so forth. So that's why I thought a journalist would be an ideal protagonist.<br /> <br /> I didn't want to have a police officer, but I wanted someone who had a similar type of role. So, that seemed like the perfect career for my protagonist when I was envisioning the series. Plus, I studied journalism. So, you know, I had a little bit of familiarity with that, that whole skill, Debbi Mack 20:15 Interview with Crime Writer Laurie Buchanan: S. 6, Ep. 19 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-laurie-buchanan-s-6-ep-19/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-laurie-buchanan-s-6-ep-19 Sun, 14 Mar 2021 05:05:32 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21416 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Laurie Buchanan on the Crime Cafe podcast. Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You’re in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Blubrry and distribution through your website. So it’s a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract. It’s just a great company, period. And I am a Blubrry affiliate. So there’s that. Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I’ll say no more. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. It’s a miracle! Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:12): Hi everyone. My guest today is the author of two self-help books and the first in a new series of crime novels. Her debut novel Indelible introduces Sean McPherson, an ex-cop turned handyman at a writer's retreat where the story takes place. Her next book in the series Iconoclast is scheduled for release in May of 2022. Twenty twenty-two. She enjoys yoga, bicycling, camping, and travel. She also likes long walks, including apparently a 211-mile hike across Scotland. Well, I'm ready to go if she is, back. Scotland's cool. It's my pleasure to introduce today's guest Laurie Buchanan. Hi Laurie. Thanks for being here. Laurie (01:50): Thanks for having me. Debbi (01:52): Sure thing. It's a pleasure. What inspired you to start writing crime fiction? After two self-help books? Laurie (02:08):I had been to, I won't name it, but I had been to a very large conference, writing conference in the Midwest. And I teach and sometimes I'm in the audience and do both sometimes at a conference, and I was teaching at a conference, but in this case I was in the audience listening to another speaker. And you know, when people go to a writing conference, they pay good money and they assume that what they're being told is accurate. And a speaker got up, a female, a well-known female writer, and she said, and she looked everybody in the face. And she said, "I hope you enjoy the genre that you're writing in because you are stuck in it. You can only write in one genre." And I thought, you know, I wanted to just stand up and say, "No, no, no, no, that's not true." So my, my way of saying that's not true is to, I stepped out of my comfort zone nonfiction and I started writing fiction and I absolutely love it. Debbi (03:04): It is wonderful, isn't it to use your imagination that way? Let's see. I take it that being at this writer's conference might've been part of the inspiration for setting your book in a your retreat? Laurie (03:20): Actually, no, I was writing my first book. I got an idea writing my first book, even though, even though my idea was for fiction, I was writing my first book and I was at a retreat on Whidbey Island and I, it was a retreat for all women writers and across the way I happened to see with my very own eyes, an extraordinarily handsome man who was the groundskeeper and he was limping. And that planted a seed, it just planted a seed and that seed took hold and grew roots, and many years later, came out in the form of a book. I was writing my first book and I was at a retreat on Whidbey Island and I, it was a retreat for all women writers and across the way I happened to see with my very own eyes, an extraordinarily handsome man who was the groundskeeper and he was limping. And that planted a seed, it just planted a seed and that seed took hold and grew roots, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Laurie Buchanan on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. - I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Laurie Buchanan on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve been using Blubrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it’s one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You’re in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Blubrry and distribution through your website. So it’s a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it’s a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn’t require a long-term contract. It’s just a great company, period. And I am a Blubrry affiliate. So there’s that.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I’ll say no more.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. It’s a miracle! Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:12): Hi everyone. My guest today is the author of two self-help books and the first in a new series of crime novels. Her debut novel Indelible introduces Sean McPherson, an ex-cop turned handyman at a writer's retreat where the story takes place. Her next book in the series Iconoclast is scheduled for release in May of 2022. Twenty twenty-two. She enjoys yoga, bicycling, camping, and travel. She also likes long walks, including apparently a 211-mile hike across Scotland. Well, I'm ready to go if she is, back. Scotland's cool. It's my pleasure to introduce today's guest Laurie Buchanan. Hi Laurie. Thanks for being here.<br /> <br /> Laurie (01:50): Thanks for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:52): Sure thing. It's a pleasure. What inspired you to start writing crime fiction? After two self-help books?<br /> <br /> Laurie (02:08):I had been to, I won't name it, but I had been to a very large conference, writing conference in the Midwest. And I teach and sometimes I'm in the audience and do both sometimes at a conference, and I was teaching at a conference, but in this case I was in the audience listening to another speaker. And you know, when people go to a writing conference, they pay good money and they assume that what they're being told is accurate. And a speaker got up, a female, a well-known female writer, and she said, and she looked everybody in the face. And she said, "I hope you enjoy the genre that you're writing in because you are stuck in it. You can only write in one genre." And I thought, you know, I wanted to just stand up and say, "No, no, no, no, that's not true." So my, my way of saying that's not true is to, I stepped out of my comfort zone nonfiction and I started writing fiction and I absolutely love it.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:04): It is wonderful, isn't it to use your imagination that way? Let's see. I take it that being at this writer's conference might've been part of the inspiration for setting your book in a your retreat?<br /> <br /> Laurie (03:20): Actually, no, I was writing my first book. I got an idea writing my first book, even though, even though my idea was for fiction, I was writing my first book and I was at a retreat on Whidbey Island and I, it was a retreat for all women writers and across the way I happened to see with my very own eyes, an extraordinarily handsome man who was the groundskeeper and he was limping. And that planted a seed, it just planted a seed and that seed took hold and grew roots, and many years later, came out in the form of a book.<br /> <br /> I was writing my first book and I was at a retreat on Whidbey Island and I, it was a retreat for all women writers and across the way I happened to see with my very own eyes, Debbi Mack 31:18 Interview with Crime Writer Frank Zafiro: S. 6, Ep. 18 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-frank-zafiro-s-6-ep-18/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-frank-zafiro-s-6-ep-18 Sun, 28 Feb 2021 05:05:55 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21338 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Frank Zafiro on the Crime Cafe podcast. Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Bluebrry podcasting. I've been using Bluebrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it's one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You're in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Bluebrry and distribution through your website. So it's a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it's a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn't require a long-term contract. It's just a great company, period. And I am a Bluebrry affiliate. So there's that. Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I'll say no more. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. It's a miracle! :) Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (02:24): Hi everyone. Today, I have a guest making his second appearance on the podcast, a retired police officer, he hails from the great state of Oregon. The author of more than 30 novels, including the River City series and the Charlie-316 series, he also hosts his own podcast, Wrong Place, Write Crime, which I have had the pleasure of being on. My guest today is Frank Zafiro. Hi, Frank. Welcome back. And thanks for being here. Frank (03:00): Hey, Debbi. Great to be back again. Debbi (03:02): Excellent. Wonderful. It's good to see you. You seem to be making something of a career out of writing collaborative novels and series. Can you write them faster than you would if you were writing them on your own or is it about the same? Frank (03:20): Oh, I think it's faster. For a couple of reasons, I mean one you are you know, you're only writing about half of the first draft, so you know, it's faster, you know? Uh, but the other thing is, is that when you're working and the bigger piece is when you're working with someone else there's a certain synergy that, that kicks in and you really gain momentum. And so when you get the piece back and it's your turn to write something you're energized and you also don't want to keep your partner waiting. In some cases, the person I'm working with, they're not working on anything else, at least not in the first draft stage. And so I'm kind of holding them up while we're doing this in a way is how I feel about it. So I want to get it back to them as quick as possible. But I think it would happen either way because there's just, you just get that really strong momentum going that you're, you know, you're building something great. And it just, it goes really fast. I mean, Charlie-316 took like three weeks and it was a hundred thousand word draft. I mean, that, to me, that was just, that blew my mind when we got to the end of it and looked at how long it had taken. Debbi (04:47): Oh my gosh, that was for a first draft, right? Frank (04:50): Yeah. And you know, the thing of it is, it's the first draft, but the way that the process works, it's a pretty tight first draft because it's been essentially edited twice, once by each of us throughout the process. So but yeah, it's still, still technically a first draft. Debbi (05:09): Well, that's fantastic. Three weeks. Wow. Frank (05:13): That's a bit of an aberration, but that's a good example of how quickly things can happen. Debbi (05:19): I was going to say would most of them be like that? Frank (05:24): Most of them are like that. Not quite as fast, but, but I, there hasn't been one that, that for in which that first draft lagged or dragged, they've all gone quickly. You know, sometimes the editing process has gone just as quickly. Other times, it's, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Frank Zafiro on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Bluebrry podcasting. - I've been using Bluebrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Frank Zafiro on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:54): But first let me put in a good word for Bluebrry podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I've been using Bluebrry podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years, and it's one of the best decisions I ever made. They provide great service. You're in complete control of your own podcast. You never have to leave your own website. There is a plugin that you can use to incorporate Bluebrry and distribution through your website. So it's a great service that has taken a lot of the work of podcasting out for me. And I find for that reason that it's a company that I can get behind 100% and say, you should try this. If you want a podcast, try out Bluebrry. It doesn't require a long-term contract. It's just a great company, period. And I am a Bluebrry affiliate. So there's that.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:07): And did I mention that they have free technical support by email, video and phone? Yes, you can actually reach a human being there. I'll say no more.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. It's a miracle! :) Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (02:24): Hi everyone. Today, I have a guest making his second appearance on the podcast, a retired police officer, he hails from the great state of Oregon. The author of more than 30 novels, including the River City series and the Charlie-316 series, he also hosts his own podcast, Wrong Place, Write Crime, which I have had the pleasure of being on. My guest today is Frank Zafiro. Hi, Frank. Welcome back. And thanks for being here.<br /> <br /> Frank (03:00): Hey, Debbi. Great to be back again.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:02): Excellent. Wonderful. It's good to see you. You seem to be making something of a career out of writing collaborative novels and series. Can you write them faster than you would if you were writing them on your own or is it about the same?<br /> <br /> Frank (03:20): Oh, I think it's faster. For a couple of reasons, I mean one you are you know, you're only writing about half of the first draft, so you know, it's faster, you know? Uh, but the other thing is, is that when you're working and the bigger piece is when you're working with someone else there's a certain synergy that, that kicks in and you really gain momentum. And so when you get the piece back and it's your turn to write something you're energized and you also don't want to keep your partner waiting. In some cases, the person I'm working with, they're not working on anything else, at least not in the first draft stage. And so I'm kind of holding them up while we're doing this in a way is how I feel about it. So I want to get it back to them as quick as possible. But I think it would happen either way because there's just, you just get that really strong momentum going that you're, you know, you're building something great. And it just, it goes really fast. I mean, Charlie-316 took like three weeks and it was a hundred thousand word draft. I mean, that, to me, that was just, that blew my mind when we got to the end of it and looked at how long it had taken.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:47): Oh my gosh, that was for a first draft, right?<br /> <br /> Frank (04:50): Yeah. And you know, the thing of it is, it's the first draft, but the way that the process works, it's a pretty tight first draft because it's been essentially edited twice, once by each of us throughout the process. So but yeah, it's still, still technically a first draft.<br /> <br /> Debbi (05:09): Well, that's fantastic. Three weeks. Wow.<br /> <br /> Frank (05:13): That's a bit of an aberration, but that's a good example of how quickly things can happen.<br /> <br /> Debbi (05:19): I was going to say would most of them be like that?<br /> <br /> Frank (05:24): Most of them are like that. Not quite as fast, but, but I, there hasn't been one that, Debbi Mack 41:41 Interview with Crime Writer Troy Lambert: S. 6, Ep. 17 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-troy-lambert-s-6-ep-17/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-troy-lambert-s-6-ep-17 Sun, 14 Feb 2021 05:05:59 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21300 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Troy Lambert on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:02): Hi everyone. My guest today is a freelance writer, author and editor, who also happens to own his own small niche publishing company. I'm very pleased to have with me today Troy Lambert. Hi, Troy. Good to have you on. Troy (02:02): Hi. It is fantastic to be here. Debbi (02:05): Well, I'm glad you're here. What kind of freelance writing do you do? Troy (02:11): So I do a variety of freelance writing. I actually started out by writing government contracts, writing research papers for the federal government, which ... The number one thing that taught me was that my words were valuable and I could get paid for writing. And so that translated into an incentive for me to expand my fiction writing career, as well as my freelance writing career. But I primarily write about business and tech, those type of things. I don't there's other little things I write about from time to time, but those were my mainstays. Debbi (02:46): Huh. So you still keep up the freelance writing then? Troy (02:50): I do. I don't do as much as I used to, but I do. And I still, I read a lot about of in-depth articles about like SEO and Google and things like that related to business, because now I use that in business. So it's, it's actually a subject I'm really familiar with. So. Debbi (03:08): Kind of a natural fit then. Is that your paying work or do you also make a living off of your fiction? Troy (03:17): Yes. So I make a living off my fiction. I make a living off of editing and I make a living off of freelance writing, primarily. I have, there's, right now, the publisher that, the niche publisher that I have that we started last year is not profitable like many small businesses. It's still in the point where almost every bit of money that's coming in is going out to build the business further. Debbi (03:41): Interesting. I was going to ask you about that publishing company. What niche do you serve? Troy (03:46): So we primarily publish what I would call minor celebrity nonfiction. So there are people that are not going to get a deal with the big book publisher, because they're going to sell, you know, 20,000 books over their lifetime, not, you know, a million, but they've still got a viable story. They've still got a viable book and they need a pathway to get it out there. But we are attempting to change the thinking about publishing to more of a print to order print-on-demand type model instead of big print runs because big print runs are wasteful financially for one thing. Those books go back to the publisher and get pulped half the time. And it's just environmentally irresponsible to print books that we're not gonna sell and then we're not going to use. And so we feel like that allows us to cut costs, be more author-centric, offer better author contracts to these guys that wouldn't necessarily get a bigger contract somewhere else, but also to just cut down on the wasteful habits and big spending, the big publishers have that are engaged in constantly. But we are attempting to change the thinking about publishing to more of a print to order print-on-demand type model instead of big print runs because big print... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Troy Lambert on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Troy Lambert on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:02): Hi everyone. My guest today is a freelance writer, author and editor, who also happens to own his own small niche publishing company. I'm very pleased to have with me today Troy Lambert. Hi, Troy. Good to have you on.<br /> <br /> Troy (02:02): Hi. It is fantastic to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:05): Well, I'm glad you're here. What kind of freelance writing do you do?<br /> <br /> Troy (02:11): So I do a variety of freelance writing. I actually started out by writing government contracts, writing research papers for the federal government, which ... The number one thing that taught me was that my words were valuable and I could get paid for writing. And so that translated into an incentive for me to expand my fiction writing career, as well as my freelance writing career. But I primarily write about business and tech, those type of things. I don't there's other little things I write about from time to time, but those were my mainstays.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:46): Huh. So you still keep up the freelance writing then?<br /> <br /> Troy (02:50): I do. I don't do as much as I used to, but I do. And I still, I read a lot about of in-depth articles about like SEO and Google and things like that related to business, because now I use that in business. So it's, it's actually a subject I'm really familiar with. So.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:08): Kind of a natural fit then. Is that your paying work or do you also make a living off of your fiction?<br /> <br /> Troy (03:17): Yes. So I make a living off my fiction. I make a living off of editing and I make a living off of freelance writing, primarily. I have, there's, right now, the publisher that, the niche publisher that I have that we started last year is not profitable like many small businesses. It's still in the point where almost every bit of money that's coming in is going out to build the business further.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:41): Interesting. I was going to ask you about that publishing company. What niche do you serve?<br /> <br /> Troy (03:46): So we primarily publish what I would call minor celebrity nonfiction. So there are people that are not going to get a deal with the big book publisher, because they're going to sell, you know, 20,000 books over their lifetime, not, you know, a million, but they've still got a viable story. They've still got a viable book and they need a pathway to get it out there. But we are attempting to change the thinking about publishing to more of a print to order print-on-demand type model instead of big print runs because big print runs are wasteful financially for one thing. Those books go back to the publisher and get pulped half the time. And it's just environmentally irresponsible to print books that we're not gonna sell and then we're not going to use. And so we feel like that allows us to cut costs, be more author-centric, offer better author contracts to these guys that wouldn't necessarily get a bigger contract somewhere else, but also to just cut down on the wasteful habits and big spending, Debbi Mack 26:36 Interview with Crime Writer James H. Roby: S. 6, Ep. 16 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-james-h-roby-s-6-ep-16/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-james-h-roby-s-6-ep-16 Sun, 31 Jan 2021 05:05:24 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21237 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer James H. Roby on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:12): Hi everyone. Our guest today is the author of the UrbanKnights thriller series. He served as an Air Force officer on active duty and in the reserves for more than 10 years. He also does his share of cool traveling to places like London, Toronto, the Arctic Circle, and the Caribbean. He also hails from the Motor City, Detroit. My guest today is James Roby. Hi James. James (01:23): Hello. How are you today? Debbi (01:25): I'm fine. How are you? James (01:27): I am outstanding. I'm happy to be here. Debbi (01:30): Excellent. Excellent. Good. So how did you get involved in fiction writing? What got you started with that? James (01:37): Well I mean, honestly, it's been almost like a lifelong thing. I remember my father liking, you know, oh, Humphrey Bogart-type movies and you know, the crime thrillers and noir and that kind of thing. And I, and I kinda picked that up from him. And then as I got older, I started looking at things like James Bond. And then later I started seeing like Shaft and all those things kind of molded together in my mind to this character I eventually created. But you know, I remember distinctly, and I'm dating myself, going to see Superman with Christopher Reeve and just being so moved by the, you know, I was a little kid, but it was like, this is a story that I wish I was in. So I started writing a character that was Superman, but it was my background. James (02:30): And then from there I started writing some other things. I did a book for a friend of mine, who's big into Star Trek. So I did like the history of the Enterprise and he really liked that. And then finally I wrote a---I'm sorry, I have to admit it. A fan fiction for a TV show I was watching. And then from there, I just, I was watching this show, another show from my past, Mike Hammer with Stacy Keach, and I really liked that show, and all those things just kind of clicked together and I've been doing it ever since. Debbi (03:02): Oh my gosh. I had no idea that you wrote fan fiction. That's so cool. James (03:06): I did one. I did one. Debbi (03:08): One. Okay. I think that's awesome. I think that's really awesome. So the UrbanKnights series has a protagonist. Who's a former operative of the Defense Intelligence Agency. That's a really interesting sort of background for private eye to come from. James (03:28): He started off. He pretty much mirrored my background until I figured he's me except cooler. And Jordan Noble started off as a missile launch officer at Minot like I did, but he had an event in his life that changed his trajectory. And I started off with the OSI, which is the Office of Special Investigation for the Air Force. It's kind of like the Air Force is FEI, but I wanted to make it a little bit more jazzy, a little cooler, you know, not so commonplace. So I'm looking at our first place, obviously the CIA, but man everybody's either ex-CIA or CIA. And at the time when I thought of using the DIA, it wasn't quite as well known in fiction. I mean, there are some characters. Denzel Washington's portrayal of the Equalizers from the DIA, but this was before that. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer James H. Roby on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer James H. Roby on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:12): Hi everyone. Our guest today is the author of the UrbanKnights thriller series. He served as an Air Force officer on active duty and in the reserves for more than 10 years. He also does his share of cool traveling to places like London, Toronto, the Arctic Circle, and the Caribbean. He also hails from the Motor City, Detroit. My guest today is James Roby. Hi James.<br /> <br /> James (01:23): Hello. How are you today?<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:25): I'm fine. How are you?<br /> <br /> James (01:27): I am outstanding. I'm happy to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:30): Excellent. Excellent. Good. So how did you get involved in fiction writing? What got you started with that?<br /> <br /> James (01:37): Well I mean, honestly, it's been almost like a lifelong thing. I remember my father liking, you know, oh, Humphrey Bogart-type movies and you know, the crime thrillers and noir and that kind of thing. And I, and I kinda picked that up from him. And then as I got older, I started looking at things like James Bond. And then later I started seeing like Shaft and all those things kind of molded together in my mind to this character I eventually created. But you know, I remember distinctly, and I'm dating myself, going to see Superman with Christopher Reeve and just being so moved by the, you know, I was a little kid, but it was like, this is a story that I wish I was in. So I started writing a character that was Superman, but it was my background.<br /> <br /> James (02:30): And then from there I started writing some other things. I did a book for a friend of mine, who's big into Star Trek. So I did like the history of the Enterprise and he really liked that. And then finally I wrote a---I'm sorry, I have to admit it. A fan fiction for a TV show I was watching. And then from there, I just, I was watching this show, another show from my past, Mike Hammer with Stacy Keach, and I really liked that show, and all those things just kind of clicked together and I've been doing it ever since.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:02): Oh my gosh. I had no idea that you wrote fan fiction. That's so cool.<br /> <br /> James (03:06): I did one. I did one.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:08): One. Okay. I think that's awesome. I think that's really awesome. So the UrbanKnights series has a protagonist. Who's a former operative of the Defense Intelligence Agency. That's a really interesting sort of background for private eye to come from.<br /> <br /> James (03:28): He started off. He pretty much mirrored my background until I figured he's me except cooler. And Jordan Noble started off as a missile launch officer at Minot like I did, but he had an event in his life that changed his trajectory. And I started off with the OSI, which is the Office of Special Investigation for the Air Force. It's kind of like the Air Force is FEI, but I wanted to make it a little bit more jazzy, a little cooler, you know, not so commonplace. So I'm looking at our first place, obviously the CIA, but man everybody's either ex-CIA or CIA. Debbi Mack 27:11 Interview with Crime Writer Cathi Stoler: S. 6, Ep. 15 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-cathi-stoler-s-6-ep-15/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-cathi-stoler-s-6-ep-15 Sun, 17 Jan 2021 05:05:47 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21197 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Cathi Stoler on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:02): Hi everybody. My guest today writes mystery and suspense novels. Her latest novel and her giveaway book is BAR NONE from the Murder on the Rocks mystery series. A board member of Sisters in Crime, New York/Tri-State, MWA and the International Thriller Writers, she's also a founding member of Sirens of Suspense, a group that offers expertise and knowledge for aspiring crime writers. I'm pleased to have with me again, Cathi Stoler. Hi Cathi. It's great to have you on. Cathi (02:27): Hi, Debbi. It's great to be here. Debbi (02:32): Oh, well it's my pleasure. Believe me. And I'm just glad you're here and doing well I hope in New York? Cathi (02:40): Yeah. You know, I mean like everyone else, it's just been a little ... Debbi (02:45): Been a little off-putting? Cathi (02:48): Yeah. Even just going outside, there's not the usual energy, you know, you feel it after a while. I'm sure you know what I mean. Debbi (02:57): Mmm-Hmm. Yeah, it's strange times overall. Tell us a little about Jude Dillane. Am I saying that correctly? Jude Dillane? And the Murder on the Rocks series? Cathi (03:14): Well Jude owns The Corner Lounge on 10th street and Avenue B on the Lower East Side. She seems to have a penchant for getting in trouble and involved in murders and mysteries. There's three books in the series. The one that was, both BAR NONE and LAST CALL came out pretty close together. The end of last year, one in July and one in November. So I'm working on the third one, it's called STRAIGHT UP and it will continue that character. And will also continue part of the story from LAST CALL, but she has a good pal Sully Thomas, Thomas "Sully" Sullivan. He's her landlord and her friend. She has good friends from before and they both sort of work together and help each other. Debbi (04:12): So there are three books in the series so far, but you're working on the next one? Cathi (04:17): I'm working on the third one. I'm almost finished with that. And then there will probably be a fourth. Debbi (04:24): Got ya. Okay. So what's the third one called again? Cathi (04:28): The third one is called STRAIGHT UP a Murder on the Rocks mystery. They will all have that tagline, same tagline. Debbi (04:40): Yeah. What inspired you to write a mystery series set in a bar? Cathi (04:45): Well, my husband was in the restaurant business for many, many years before he left that business, and I used to go visit him. He always worked close to where we lived and I would visit him at the bar, and I got to know all the people, the waiters, the waitresses, the cooks, and you know, the other staff. And it was just fun. You know, it was a fun kind of environment. He always said, Oh, he thought maybe he'd write a book someday, but I knew he was not going to really do that. So I just stole his idea. No murders ever took place at the bars where he worked or anyone involved in any, so. [M]y husband was in the restaurant business for many, many years before he left that business, and I used to go visit him. He always worked close to where we lived and I would visit him at the bar, and I got to know all the people, the waiters, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Cathi Stoler on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Cathi Stoler on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:02): Hi everybody. My guest today writes mystery and suspense novels. Her latest novel and her giveaway book is BAR NONE from the Murder on the Rocks mystery series. A board member of Sisters in Crime, New York/Tri-State, MWA and the International Thriller Writers, she's also a founding member of Sirens of Suspense, a group that offers expertise and knowledge for aspiring crime writers. I'm pleased to have with me again, Cathi Stoler. Hi Cathi. It's great to have you on.<br /> <br /> Cathi (02:27): Hi, Debbi. It's great to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:32): Oh, well it's my pleasure. Believe me. And I'm just glad you're here and doing well I hope in New York?<br /> <br /> Cathi (02:40): Yeah. You know, I mean like everyone else, it's just been a little ...<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:45): Been a little off-putting?<br /> <br /> Cathi (02:48): Yeah. Even just going outside, there's not the usual energy, you know, you feel it after a while. I'm sure you know what I mean.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:57): Mmm-Hmm. Yeah, it's strange times overall. Tell us a little about Jude Dillane. Am I saying that correctly? Jude Dillane? And the Murder on the Rocks series?<br /> <br /> Cathi (03:14): Well Jude owns The Corner Lounge on 10th street and Avenue B on the Lower East Side. She seems to have a penchant for getting in trouble and involved in murders and mysteries. There's three books in the series. The one that was, both BAR NONE and LAST CALL came out pretty close together. The end of last year, one in July and one in November. So I'm working on the third one, it's called STRAIGHT UP and it will continue that character. And will also continue part of the story from LAST CALL, but she has a good pal Sully Thomas, Thomas "Sully" Sullivan. He's her landlord and her friend. She has good friends from before and they both sort of work together and help each other.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:12): So there are three books in the series so far, but you're working on the next one?<br /> <br /> Cathi (04:17): I'm working on the third one. I'm almost finished with that. And then there will probably be a fourth.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:24): Got ya. Okay. So what's the third one called again?<br /> <br /> Cathi (04:28): The third one is called STRAIGHT UP a Murder on the Rocks mystery. They will all have that tagline, same tagline.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:40): Yeah. What inspired you to write a mystery series set in a bar?<br /> <br /> Cathi (04:45): Well, my husband was in the restaurant business for many, many years before he left that business, and I used to go visit him. He always worked close to where we lived and I would visit him at the bar, and I got to know all the people, the waiters, the waitresses, the cooks, and you know, the other staff. And it was just fun. You know, it was a fun kind of environment. He always said, Oh, he thought maybe he'd write a book someday, but I knew he was not going to really do that. So I just stole his idea. No murders ever took place at the bars where he worked or anyone involved in any, Debbi Mack 25:16 Interview with Crime Writer Phillip Thompson: S. 6, Ep. 14 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-phillip-thompson-s-6-ep-14/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-phillip-thompson-s-6-ep-14 Sun, 10 Jan 2021 05:05:13 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21181 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Phillip Thompson on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:12): Hi everyone. My guest today is a crime novelist and short story writer. His work has appeared in such literary journals as O-Dark-Thirty, Near to the Knuckle, and The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, a title I really love. And these are just a few. It's a pleasure to have with me for his second appearance on the Crime Cafe, crime writer, Phillip Thompson. Hi Phillip. How are you doing today? Phillip (02:14): Good, Debbi, how are you? Debbi (02:16): Not bad. Thanks. All things considered. We were just talking about 2020 and what a weird year it's been Have the holidays been good ones for you? Phillip (02:27): They have, I mean, as good as any holiday can be in this year very low-key. It's been pretty good though. Debbi (02:37): That's awesome. Do you make new year's resolutions? I'm not a new year's resolutions kind of person. I always believe that anytime you want to make a change, you can make it regardless of the time of the year, but in a sense this year seems like one of those years where people are really thinking about that kind of thing. How do you come out on this? Phillip (03:00): You know, I, I don't think I ever have I used to have the, sort of the smart-alecky "my new year's resolution is to not make any new year's resolutions." But no, I don't. I kind of, I like your philosophy. If you need to make a change, you can make it, you know, on April the third, if you need to. Debbi (03:19): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Or maybe even April 1st, but really mean it. Phillip (03:28): Right. Debbi (03:28): And everybody will think you're kidding. I don't know. Phillip (03:33): Well, then you get away with it, if you don't see it through. Debbi (03:36): Then you have an excuse. Yeah. Wow. I didn't even think about that. A new trend. Fantastic. Let's see, the last time you were here, you released a second Colt Harper novel, I believe. OUTSIDE THE LAW? And now you have your third one out called OLD ANGER. What is this book about? Tell us about the story. Phillip (04:02): Okay. It's, like you said, it's the third in the series and it's, this story is really, as the title might suggest it, it brings up a couple of old issues that have been hanging around, not just, not just for the characters, but for the place, which would of course be the Deep South. All the books take place in Mississippi. And it's really a story of, of the issues that come with Southern racism and the perceptions around that. Debbi (04:40): Yes. What kind of a person is Colt Harper and what are your plans for him generally speaking? Colt is kind of a guy who sees himself as a lawman. That's you know, it's his version of upholding the law has an awful lot to do with, with meting out justice. But I think he has a hard time seeing the difference between justice and revenge or, you know, redemption and revenge. Phillip (04:49): Well, Colt is kind of a guy who sees himself as a lawman. That's you know, it's his version of upholding the law has an awful lot to do with, with meting out justice. But I think he has a hard time seeing the difference between justice and revenge or, you know, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Phillip Thompson on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Phillip Thompson on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:12): Hi everyone. My guest today is a crime novelist and short story writer. His work has appeared in such literary journals as O-Dark-Thirty, Near to the Knuckle, and The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, a title I really love. And these are just a few. It's a pleasure to have with me for his second appearance on the Crime Cafe, crime writer, Phillip Thompson. Hi Phillip. How are you doing today?<br /> <br /> Phillip (02:14): Good, Debbi, how are you?<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:16): Not bad. Thanks. All things considered. We were just talking about 2020 and what a weird year it's been Have the holidays been good ones for you?<br /> <br /> Phillip (02:27): They have, I mean, as good as any holiday can be in this year very low-key. It's been pretty good though.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:37): That's awesome. Do you make new year's resolutions? I'm not a new year's resolutions kind of person. I always believe that anytime you want to make a change, you can make it regardless of the time of the year, but in a sense this year seems like one of those years where people are really thinking about that kind of thing. How do you come out on this?<br /> <br /> Phillip (03:00): You know, I, I don't think I ever have I used to have the, sort of the smart-alecky "my new year's resolution is to not make any new year's resolutions." But no, I don't. I kind of, I like your philosophy. If you need to make a change, you can make it, you know, on April the third, if you need to.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:19): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Or maybe even April 1st, but really mean it.<br /> <br /> Phillip (03:28): Right.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:28): And everybody will think you're kidding. I don't know.<br /> <br /> Phillip (03:33): Well, then you get away with it, if you don't see it through.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:36): Then you have an excuse. Yeah. Wow. I didn't even think about that. A new trend. Fantastic. Let's see, the last time you were here, you released a second Colt Harper novel, I believe. OUTSIDE THE LAW? And now you have your third one out called OLD ANGER. What is this book about? Tell us about the story.<br /> <br /> Phillip (04:02): Okay. It's, like you said, it's the third in the series and it's, this story is really, as the title might suggest it, it brings up a couple of old issues that have been hanging around, not just, not just for the characters, but for the place, which would of course be the Deep South. All the books take place in Mississippi. And it's really a story of, of the issues that come with Southern racism and the perceptions around that.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:40): Yes. What kind of a person is Colt Harper and what are your plans for him generally speaking?<br /> <br /> Colt is kind of a guy who sees himself as a lawman. That's you know, it's his version of upholding the law has an awful lot to do with, with meting out justice. But I think he has a hard time seeing the difference between justice and revenge or, you know, redemption and revenge.<br /> <br /> Phillip (04:49): Well, Debbi Mack 29:15 Interview with Thriller Writer Avanti Centrae: S. 6, Ep. 13 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-thriller-writer-avanti-centrae-s-6-ep-13/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-thriller-writer-avanti-centrae-s-6-ep-13 Sun, 27 Dec 2020 05:05:49 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21148 Debbi Mack interviews thriller writer Avanti Centrae on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:12): Hi everyone. My guest today is the best selling author of the VanOps thriller series. Her first in the series, The Lost Power has received several awards and upon its release was a Barnes & Noble bestseller. Solstice Shadows, also a Barnes & Noble bestseller after its release, as well as an Amazon bestseller, is her latest book. It's a pleasure to introduce my guest Avanti Centrae. Hi Avanti. Thank you for being here today. Avanti (02:20): Yeah. Hi Debbi and everyone who's listening. I'm thrilled to be here to to chat a little bit more with an audience that enjoys crime as much as I do in the fiction sense, of course. Yes. Debbi (02:33): Naturally, of course. Let's see, tell us about the VanOps series. You've been compared to authors like Dan Brown and Clive Cussler. So action packed might be a good word for it. Yes? Avanti (02:48): Action packed. Yes. A lot of readers have said they're literally glued to the edge of their seat. I've had people tell me they are holding their breath, and that's fantastic. Yeah, the other two authors that I'm often compared to are James Rollins and Steve Berry. So it's smart pulp fiction. It's filled with intrigue and history and science and mystery kind of all wrapped up in a non-stop action package. Debbi (03:18): Yeah, I was gonna say I started writing down what your book was like—the first one. And I wrote "like a travel guide with an adventure story, plus mysticism, history, artifact hunting, and spycraft." Avanti (03:33): Pretty much encapsulates it. Yeah. I've always been an overachiever. Yeah. I've always been an overachiever. And yeah, I like to provide readers with, you know, their money's worth as I'm a reader, too. And I like books that are richly textured with characters that jump off the page, you know, and I've always enjoyed history, and traveling and cruising to, you know, places around the world and wanting to include all of that in my books. Debbi (04:13): Well, you've done very well with that. I mean, you've done a great job because I was the same way. I was kind of on the edge of my seat, reading your first book there. And your protagonist is Maddy, who is an aikido expert. I thought that was really cool. What inspired you to create this particular character? Avanti (04:35): Yeah, that's an insightful question, Debbi. And I also liked Erica Jensen in your yeah, I just read, I just read Damaged Goods and really enjoyed her, too. Maddy they, they both meditate actually. It was kind of interested to see that your character is dealing with some, you know, deep emotional stuff and uses meditation as a way to, to deal with that. And Maddy's got a little bit more of a pedestrian background than Erica does. So Maddy has been an app designer for her job. She was an almost Olympic athlete, so she's got some physical skills, and since high school she's enjoyed aikido. And the reason that I chose aikito is because I see a lot of books in our genre where the protagonist is almost callous, you know? Oh, bang bang. I had to shoot somebody again. Oh, well. Avanti (05:36): Well, I wanted somebody that was more morally conflicted about having to use ... Debbi Mack interviews thriller writer Avanti Centrae on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews thriller writer Avanti Centrae on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:12): Hi everyone. My guest today is the best selling author of the VanOps thriller series. Her first in the series, The Lost Power has received several awards and upon its release was a Barnes & Noble bestseller. Solstice Shadows, also a Barnes & Noble bestseller after its release, as well as an Amazon bestseller, is her latest book. It's a pleasure to introduce my guest Avanti Centrae. Hi Avanti. Thank you for being here today.<br /> <br /> Avanti (02:20): Yeah. Hi Debbi and everyone who's listening. I'm thrilled to be here to to chat a little bit more with an audience that enjoys crime as much as I do in the fiction sense, of course. Yes.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:33): Naturally, of course. Let's see, tell us about the VanOps series. You've been compared to authors like Dan Brown and Clive Cussler. So action packed might be a good word for it. Yes?<br /> <br /> Avanti (02:48): Action packed. Yes. A lot of readers have said they're literally glued to the edge of their seat. I've had people tell me they are holding their breath, and that's fantastic. Yeah, the other two authors that I'm often compared to are James Rollins and Steve Berry. So it's smart pulp fiction. It's filled with intrigue and history and science and mystery kind of all wrapped up in a non-stop action package.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:18): Yeah, I was gonna say I started writing down what your book was like—the first one. And I wrote "like a travel guide with an adventure story, plus mysticism, history, artifact hunting, and spycraft."<br /> <br /> Avanti (03:33): Pretty much encapsulates it. Yeah. I've always been an overachiever. Yeah. I've always been an overachiever. And yeah, I like to provide readers with, you know, their money's worth as I'm a reader, too. And I like books that are richly textured with characters that jump off the page, you know, and I've always enjoyed history, and traveling and cruising to, you know, places around the world and wanting to include all of that in my books.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:13): Well, you've done very well with that. I mean, you've done a great job because I was the same way. I was kind of on the edge of my seat, reading your first book there. And your protagonist is Maddy, who is an aikido expert. I thought that was really cool. What inspired you to create this particular character?<br /> <br /> Avanti (04:35): Yeah, that's an insightful question, Debbi. And I also liked Erica Jensen in your yeah, I just read, I just read Damaged Goods and really enjoyed her, too. Maddy they, they both meditate actually. It was kind of interested to see that your character is dealing with some, you know, deep emotional stuff and uses meditation as a way to, to deal with that. And Maddy's got a little bit more of a pedestrian background than Erica does. So Maddy has been an app designer for her job. She was an almost Olympic athlete, so she's got some physical skills, and since high school she's enjoyed aikido. And the reason that I chose aikito is because I see a lot of books in our genre where the protagonist i... Debbi Mack 33:36 Interview with Mystery Writer Lindsey Richardson: S. 6, Ep. 12 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-mystery-writer-lindsey-richardson-s-6-ep-12/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-mystery-writer-lindsey-richardson-s-6-ep-12 Sun, 13 Dec 2020 05:05:16 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21108 Debbi Mack interviews mystery writer Lindsey Richardson on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:02): Hi everyone. Our guest today describes herself as a fantasy author, or at least she started as a fantasy author. She's written a four-book series, the Magician Series, and has started another series. One that combines mystery and fantasy, which I think is really cool. Her latest book in that series, Clara and Daphne is set to release on December 6th, which means by the time you hear this, it should be out. So go out and get ready to buy. A fellow Marylander and cat lover, it's my pleasure to introduce our guest, Lindsey Richardson. It's so great to have you on. Thank you. Lindsey (01:39): Thank you so much for having me. Debbi (01:41): It's my pleasure. I think it's interesting that despite being a Nancy Drew fan as a child, you ended up writing fantasy. Lindsey (01:51): Yeah. Debbi (01:52): At first. What inspired you to write the Magician Series? Lindsey (01:56): Well, I would say growing up, I was reading a lot of mystery and fantasy books. Like Tamora Pierce. She was a huge inspiration for me. I read so many of her books and I just found that I was always writing stories. And I was reading a lot of fantasy series as well. So I guess that kind of sparked this idea that, Hey, I could, you know, write a fantasy series of my own and see how that goes. Debbi (02:26): Wow. When I think of fantasy, I think of world-building, you know, and it's like, you have to create this whole world. And what, what do you do exactly? How do you go about creating that world? Do you come up with the whole thing before you start writing or do you find yourself developing the world as you write? Lindsey (02:51): I think I figure it out as I go. I'm not exactly very good at planning ahead. Especially at the beginning of my series, like my current series right now the one that's fantasy and mystery, that one, I kind of just figured out, because the entire world is fantasy. So I kind of just figured out as I went along building, you know, these islands that had magic in them and figuring out how their world was going to work with the characters. I think I figure it out as I go. I'm not exactly very good at planning ahead. Especially at the beginning of my series, like my current series right now the one that's fantasy and mystery, that one, I kind of just figured out, because the entire world is fantasy. Debbi (03:26): Can you tell me a little bit about the series? Let's, let's start with the magician series. You've got this series of books. There are four of them, correct? And each one has a different protagonist, but it's the same world and the same event taking place, correct? Yes. Yeah. White versus Black magician type thing or Dark magician. Lindsey (03:50): Yeah. Yeah. So the Magician Series is fantasy with a little bit of historic fiction mixed in It's set back in Transylvania in the 1500s and each book has a different point of view from one of the five Dark magicians. And I kind of wanted to do a thing where we could see both the point of view from the Dark magicians, as well as what the White magicians were looking at to see it wasn't just black and white. Good versus evil. Debbi Mack interviews mystery writer Lindsey Richardson on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews mystery writer Lindsey Richardson on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:02): Hi everyone. Our guest today describes herself as a fantasy author, or at least she started as a fantasy author. She's written a four-book series, the Magician Series, and has started another series. One that combines mystery and fantasy, which I think is really cool. Her latest book in that series, Clara and Daphne is set to release on December 6th, which means by the time you hear this, it should be out. So go out and get ready to buy. A fellow Marylander and cat lover, it's my pleasure to introduce our guest, Lindsey Richardson. It's so great to have you on. Thank you.<br /> Lindsey (01:39): Thank you so much for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:41): It's my pleasure. I think it's interesting that despite being a Nancy Drew fan as a child, you ended up writing fantasy.<br /> <br /> Lindsey (01:51): Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:52): At first. What inspired you to write the Magician Series?<br /> <br /> Lindsey (01:56): Well, I would say growing up, I was reading a lot of mystery and fantasy books. Like Tamora Pierce. She was a huge inspiration for me. I read so many of her books and I just found that I was always writing stories. And I was reading a lot of fantasy series as well. So I guess that kind of sparked this idea that, Hey, I could, you know, write a fantasy series of my own and see how that goes.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:26): Wow. When I think of fantasy, I think of world-building, you know, and it's like, you have to create this whole world. And what, what do you do exactly? How do you go about creating that world? Do you come up with the whole thing before you start writing or do you find yourself developing the world as you write?<br /> <br /> Lindsey (02:51): I think I figure it out as I go. I'm not exactly very good at planning ahead. Especially at the beginning of my series, like my current series right now the one that's fantasy and mystery, that one, I kind of just figured out, because the entire world is fantasy. So I kind of just figured out as I went along building, you know, these islands that had magic in them and figuring out how their world was going to work with the characters.<br /> <br /> I think I figure it out as I go. I'm not exactly very good at planning ahead. Especially at the beginning of my series, like my current series right now the one that's fantasy and mystery, that one, I kind of just figured out, because the entire world is fantasy.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:26): Can you tell me a little bit about the series? Let's, let's start with the magician series. You've got this series of books. There are four of them, correct? And each one has a different protagonist, but it's the same world and the same event taking place, correct? Yes. Yeah. White versus Black magician type thing or Dark magician.<br /> <br /> Lindsey (03:50): Yeah. Yeah. So the Magician Series is fantasy with a little bit of historic fiction mixed in It's set back in Transylvania in the 1500s and each book has a different point of view from one of the five Dark magicians. Debbi Mack 20:27 Interview with Crime Writer Dana Haynes: S. 6, Ep. 11 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-dana-haynes-s-6-ep-11/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-dana-haynes-s-6-ep-11 Sun, 22 Nov 2020 05:05:37 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21049 Debbi Mack interviews crime and thriller writer Dana Haynes on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:02): Hello everyone. My guest today is an award winning journalist who spent more than 20 years in Oregon newsrooms. I like that. He is not only a thriller novelist, but also a screenwriter. In fact, his first screenplay, an adaptation of his first thriller novel Crashers made the Nicholl Fellowship semifinals in 2005. That's pretty impressive. It's my great pleasure to introduce thriller author, screenwriter, and Pacific Northwest native, Dana Haynes. Hi Dana. Thanks for being here. Dana (01:16): Hey, it's good to be here. Debbi (01:18): I'm so glad you're with us. Oregon is just a beautiful state and Portland's an awesome town. Do you do a lot of signings at Powell's? You know, back when you could do signings? Dana (01:31): Yes, we are incredibly fortunate to have many good independent bookstores in the Portland metropolitan area. We have several, so I will do one at the Powell's downtown or the Powell's in the suburbs or at Annie Bloom's. We are very, very fortunate to have this ring of independent bookstores that go from the coast up into the mountains. Dana (01:49): And it's one of the blessings of being in Oregon, how many independent thriving, independent bookstores we have. Quick story. My wife and I went to Powell's the other day on a Saturday and everybody stood outside six feet apart and everybody had masks on, everybody was patient and they're on the phones. You finally got to go in. The lines inside were very, very long. Nobody was kvetching, nobody's complaining. The luxury of having a bookstore, a world-class bookstore like that in the heart of downtown is something we just don't ever kvetch about. Debbi (02:18): I think that's awesome. That is so awesome. I love it. All of it. I'm interested in how you decided to branch out into writing thrillers from journalism to thrillers. What brought you from one to the other? Dana (02:33): I'm not sure it was that order because my father was a huge fan of thrillers. And so when we were growing up, Dad would read books that he thought were exciting and terrific, and he burst into your bedroom and throw them on your bed and say, "You've got to read this!" My father was a high school basketball coach. They talk like that. Quick, you got to read this. And so early on I was reading Gunga Din and Beau Geste and The Four Feathers, and I was being brought up with those stories cause my dad thought they were incredibly cool. So when I was, this is a true story. When I was in high school, I thought I was either going to have a career in journalism, which was my first love or as a novelist writing the kind of stories my dad would read, and lo and behold, I'm doing them both. I'm the most fortunate guy in the whole world. When I was in high school, I thought I was either going to have a career in journalism, which was my first love or as a novelist writing the kind of stories my dad would read, and lo and behold, I'm doing them both. I'm the most fortunate guy in the whole world. Debbi (03:17): That's fantastic. That's really wonderful. And you're doing screenplays. At least one, Dana (03:25): Not successfully. But they're great fun. Debbi Mack interviews crime and thriller writer Dana Haynes on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime and thriller writer Dana Haynes on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:02): Hello everyone. My guest today is an award winning journalist who spent more than 20 years in Oregon newsrooms. I like that. He is not only a thriller novelist, but also a screenwriter. In fact, his first screenplay, an adaptation of his first thriller novel Crashers made the Nicholl Fellowship semifinals in 2005. That's pretty impressive. It's my great pleasure to introduce thriller author, screenwriter, and Pacific Northwest native, Dana Haynes. Hi Dana. Thanks for being here.<br /> <br /> Dana (01:16): Hey, it's good to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:18): I'm so glad you're with us. Oregon is just a beautiful state and Portland's an awesome town. Do you do a lot of signings at Powell's? You know, back when you could do signings?<br /> <br /> Dana (01:31): Yes, we are incredibly fortunate to have many good independent bookstores in the Portland metropolitan area. We have several, so I will do one at the Powell's downtown or the Powell's in the suburbs or at Annie Bloom's. We are very, very fortunate to have this ring of independent bookstores that go from the coast up into the mountains.<br /> <br /> Dana (01:49): And it's one of the blessings of being in Oregon, how many independent thriving, independent bookstores we have. Quick story. My wife and I went to Powell's the other day on a Saturday and everybody stood outside six feet apart and everybody had masks on, everybody was patient and they're on the phones. You finally got to go in. The lines inside were very, very long. Nobody was kvetching, nobody's complaining. The luxury of having a bookstore, a world-class bookstore like that in the heart of downtown is something we just don't ever kvetch about.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:18): I think that's awesome. That is so awesome. I love it. All of it. I'm interested in how you decided to branch out into writing thrillers from journalism to thrillers. What brought you from one to the other?<br /> <br /> Dana (02:33): I'm not sure it was that order because my father was a huge fan of thrillers. And so when we were growing up, Dad would read books that he thought were exciting and terrific, and he burst into your bedroom and throw them on your bed and say, "You've got to read this!" My father was a high school basketball coach. They talk like that. Quick, you got to read this. And so early on I was reading Gunga Din and Beau Geste and The Four Feathers, and I was being brought up with those stories cause my dad thought they were incredibly cool. So when I was, this is a true story. When I was in high school, I thought I was either going to have a career in journalism, which was my first love or as a novelist writing the kind of stories my dad would read, and lo and behold, I'm doing them both. I'm the most fortunate guy in the whole world.<br /> <br /> When I was in high school, I thought I was either going to have a career in journalism, which was my first love or as a novelist writing the kind of stories my dad would read, and lo and behold, I'm doing them both. Debbi Mack 28:12 Interview with Crime Writer Sandra Woffington: S. 6, Ep. 10 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-sandra-woffington-s-6-ep-10/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-sandra-woffington-s-6-ep-10 Sun, 08 Nov 2020 05:05:16 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=21019 Debbi Mack interviews crime and suspense writer Sandra Woffington on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:12): With me today is an author who, along with her Wine Valley Mystery series has written a standalone set in Saudi Arabia and a middle grade fantasy book, both of which have been shortlisted for awards. Her Wine Valley mysteries are also available in a box set that became a number one Amazon bestseller upon its release. That is amazing. I'm pleased to have with me today author Sandra Woffington. Hi, Sandra. How are you doing today? Sandra (02:14): Hi, Debbi. I'm good. Thank you for inviting me to the Crime Cafe. I'm happy to be here. And I wanted to tell you, I love your intro music. It really sets the mood for crime. Debbi (02:24): Thank you so much. Yeah, because I happened to find this music. I don't know if it was on the Mac or, or through YouTube, but I happened to find it and I thought, wow, that's just perfect. Sandra (02:37): It is perfect. Debbi (02:38): Well, thank you. Thank you very much. And thanks for being with us. At some point I'm going to sit down and figure out how many authors come on here who have traveled to interesting places because I seem to be collecting them. It was after you married that you moved to Saudi Arabia with your husband, correct? Sandra (03:00): Yeah, he was already there. We actually ... Wild story, but I was on a tour of Europe for a month in, I was 21 and I met him in a disco in Lucerne, Switzerland. He was there on business from Saudi Arabia, even though he was American. And then I went back to California, he went back to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and then we got to know each other through letters and met once in New York, which was about halfway and then decided to marry. And then I moved to Saudi Arabia. Debbi (03:32): Wow. That must've been quite a change for you. Now that first novel you worked on there. That was your first novel, and it was called Unveiling? Sandra (03:45): Yes. I think what travel does for you at 21, it was, it was almost ironic because one of my favorite books growing up were the stories of One Thousand and One Arabian nights with Aladdin and Sinbad and magic, and also the wit. Outsmarting each other with the characters. And I felt like I landed there. It literally, when I was there, it was during the period of the oil boom around 1979. And it was still camels in the desert. I look at Riyadh today and it's a fast paced city, but it was quickly disappearing. And I was fortunate enough to meet Safeya Binzagr, who is a renown Saudi female artist. She actually has opened a school and a museum in Jiddah, which is on the coast. And she inspired that story because she was ... In her art, she tries to capture what she saw as her traditions and culture quickly disappearing. Sandra (04:56): I saw that, too. There were beautiful mud, still mud houses, these fantastic mud buildings with balconies. And they were all being torn down and then European visions of beauty and marble, shiny marble were being put up. And when we took her out to see some ruins that she might be interested in painting, she took off her veils and I went, Whoa. And she had her niece with her. And it dawned on me that she's an artist and she needs her ey... Debbi Mack interviews crime and suspense writer Sandra Woffington on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime and suspense writer Sandra Woffington on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:12): With me today is an author who, along with her Wine Valley Mystery series has written a standalone set in Saudi Arabia and a middle grade fantasy book, both of which have been shortlisted for awards. Her Wine Valley mysteries are also available in a box set that became a number one Amazon bestseller upon its release. That is amazing. I'm pleased to have with me today author Sandra Woffington. Hi, Sandra. How are you doing today?<br /> <br /> Sandra (02:14): Hi, Debbi. I'm good. Thank you for inviting me to the Crime Cafe. I'm happy to be here. And I wanted to tell you, I love your intro music. It really sets the mood for crime.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:24): Thank you so much. Yeah, because I happened to find this music. I don't know if it was on the Mac or, or through YouTube, but I happened to find it and I thought, wow, that's just perfect.<br /> <br /> Sandra (02:37): It is perfect.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:38): Well, thank you. Thank you very much. And thanks for being with us. At some point I'm going to sit down and figure out how many authors come on here who have traveled to interesting places because I seem to be collecting them. It was after you married that you moved to Saudi Arabia with your husband, correct?<br /> <br /> Sandra (03:00): Yeah, he was already there. We actually ... Wild story, but I was on a tour of Europe for a month in, I was 21 and I met him in a disco in Lucerne, Switzerland. He was there on business from Saudi Arabia, even though he was American. And then I went back to California, he went back to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and then we got to know each other through letters and met once in New York, which was about halfway and then decided to marry. And then I moved to Saudi Arabia.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:32): Wow. That must've been quite a change for you. Now that first novel you worked on there. That was your first novel, and it was called Unveiling?<br /> <br /> Sandra (03:45): Yes. I think what travel does for you at 21, it was, it was almost ironic because one of my favorite books growing up were the stories of One Thousand and One Arabian nights with Aladdin and Sinbad and magic, and also the wit. Outsmarting each other with the characters. And I felt like I landed there. It literally, when I was there, it was during the period of the oil boom around 1979. And it was still camels in the desert. I look at Riyadh today and it's a fast paced city, but it was quickly disappearing. And I was fortunate enough to meet Safeya Binzagr, who is a renown Saudi female artist. She actually has opened a school and a museum in Jiddah, which is on the coast. And she inspired that story because she was ... In her art, she tries to capture what she saw as her traditions and culture quickly disappearing.<br /> <br /> Sandra (04:56): I saw that, too. There were beautiful mud, still mud houses, these fantastic mud buildings with balconies. And they were all being torn down and then European visions of beauty and marble, shiny marble were being put up. Debbi Mack 30:33 Interview with Crime Writer A.C. Frieden: S. 6, Ep. 9 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-a-c-frieden-s-6-ep-9/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-a-c-frieden-s-6-ep-9 Sun, 25 Oct 2020 04:05:30 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20959 Debbi Mack interviews crime and suspense writer A.C. Frieden on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:14): Hi everyone. Today's guest has a most interesting background. A native of Switzerland, he's traveled widely. While living in the Southern US, he earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in molecular biology, two law degrees, and got his pilot's license and scuba instructor license. So I guess you could say he keeps busy, his fiction reflects much of his travel experience and his extensive research, both historical and journalistic. In addition to writing mysteries and thrillers, he's one of the country's preeminent technology lawyers. Interesting. It's a great pleasure to introduce my guest AC Frieden. Hi Andre. Thank you so much for being here. AC (00:14): It's a pleasure to join your podcast. I'm delighted. And as a fellow lawyer, it's always a pleasure as well to, uh, to chat. I think all our legal experience ends up creeping into our books in one way or another. Debbi (00:14): Isn't that the truth? I'm always amazed when practicing lawyers find the time and energy to write fiction. How do you balance your various obligations? AC (03:08): I would say that I balance it well, although I think pretty much everyone around me and my family would probably disagree with me. But it is a, you know, a time management challenge you write when you can Sometimes ideas come to your head and you have to write them down in some way quickly or they'll leave. So it's something that you, you learn to do it, it's never perfect. But at the end of the day, the drive is to get the book out. And I think that keeps you focused. Debbi (03:45): Yeah. I think that's a lot of truth in that, in what you're saying. I think that's great thoughts there. I absolutely agree getting things down when you think about them or if they're important, they'll stay there and you get them down. You know what I mean? It's like sometimes you have all these ideas, but one will kind of fixate itself in your mind? Get it down and don't worry about it being perfect. AC (04:14): And the thing is, you know, you can think of a schedule. You can think of, you can outline as much as you want, but you have to leave your mind open to things that pop up, you know, as you're writing your story. So things change no matter how much planning you do ahead of time, whether it's plot or character issues. Things will come up, you know, or your editor, the worst case is your editor find something wrong and you've got to do a lot of fixing, so that, that can happen, too. Debbi (04:47): Yeah. I agree with you completely on all of that. How many hours would you estimate you spend on research for a book versus writing it? AC (04:58): Well, I put research really into two buckets. So first there is you know, obviously the online part of the research to, you know, everything from looking at the history of a particular site that you're going to use or finding you know, details about a fictional character that you obviously want to be as real as possible. So the challenge is, you know, spending the hours online to do that research. And then for me, and I think one of the things that makes my research fun and exciting is the travel component. Debbi Mack interviews crime and suspense writer A.C. Frieden on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime and suspense writer A.C. Frieden on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> And, once again, we have a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:14): Hi everyone. Today's guest has a most interesting background. A native of Switzerland, he's traveled widely. While living in the Southern US, he earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in molecular biology, two law degrees, and got his pilot's license and scuba instructor license. So I guess you could say he keeps busy, his fiction reflects much of his travel experience and his extensive research, both historical and journalistic. In addition to writing mysteries and thrillers, he's one of the country's preeminent technology lawyers. Interesting. It's a great pleasure to introduce my guest AC Frieden. Hi Andre. Thank you so much for being here.<br /> <br /> AC (00:14): It's a pleasure to join your podcast. I'm delighted. And as a fellow lawyer, it's always a pleasure as well to, uh, to chat. I think all our legal experience ends up creeping into our books in one way or another.<br /> <br /> Debbi (00:14): Isn't that the truth? I'm always amazed when practicing lawyers find the time and energy to write fiction. How do you balance your various obligations?<br /> <br /> AC (03:08): I would say that I balance it well, although I think pretty much everyone around me and my family would probably disagree with me. But it is a, you know, a time management challenge you write when you can Sometimes ideas come to your head and you have to write them down in some way quickly or they'll leave. So it's something that you, you learn to do it, it's never perfect. But at the end of the day, the drive is to get the book out. And I think that keeps you focused.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:45): Yeah. I think that's a lot of truth in that, in what you're saying. I think that's great thoughts there. I absolutely agree getting things down when you think about them or if they're important, they'll stay there and you get them down. You know what I mean? It's like sometimes you have all these ideas, but one will kind of fixate itself in your mind? Get it down and don't worry about it being perfect.<br /> <br /> AC (04:14): And the thing is, you know, you can think of a schedule. You can think of, you can outline as much as you want, but you have to leave your mind open to things that pop up, you know, as you're writing your story. So things change no matter how much planning you do ahead of time, whether it's plot or character issues. Things will come up, you know, or your editor, the worst case is your editor find something wrong and you've got to do a lot of fixing, so that, that can happen, too.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:47): Yeah. I agree with you completely on all of that. How many hours would you estimate you spend on research for a book versus writing it?<br /> <br /> AC (04:58): Well, I put research really into two buckets. So first there is you know, obviously the online part of the research to, you know, everything from looking at the history of a particular site that you're going to use or finding you know, details about a fictional character that you obviously want to be as real as possible. Debbi Mack 32:29 Interview with Crime and Suspense Writer Wendy Hewlett: S. 6, Ep. 8 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-and-suspense-writer-wendy-hewlett-s-6-ep-8/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-and-suspense-writer-wendy-hewlett-s-6-ep-8 Sun, 11 Oct 2020 04:05:22 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20905 Debbi Mack interviews crime and suspense writer Wendy Hewlett on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (00:00): Hi, everyone. My guest today writes crime fiction with a hint of romance and strong female characters. So, all right. I like that. She's held a number of interesting jobs, which seems to be a trait among many writers that I know. She also has degrees in creative writing, forensic sciences, law, and security, to name a few. She has also pursued her lifelong dream of living in Edinburgh, Scotland, which is a really cool place. My guest today is crime writer, Wendy Hewlett. Hi Wendy. Thanks for being here today. Wendy (01:32): Hi, Debbi. Thanks for having me. Debbi (01:35): It's a pleasure. Believe me. You have two series as well as the book you're giving away Ailey of Skye. Is that how you pronounce it? Wendy (01:47): Yeah. Yeah. Debbi (01:49): It's short for Aileen then. Is it? Wendy (01:52): Yeah, it is. Debbi (01:53): I like that. It's my sister's middle name, and I just started the first in the Taylor Sinclair series, Saving Grace. She's a very interesting protagonist. Can you tell us more about the series and about Taylor Sinclair? Wendy (02:08): Sure. All of my characters that I write are very strong women and they become that way from the hardships that they have been through in their lives. And, and Taylor has been through probably more than most and, and of course that involves PTSD and, and overcoming that. So she's got a lot of issues and she spent most of her life living on the streets of Toronto and the first book in the series Saving Grace is her story of coming off the streets and the people that help her to do that who become very close friends, a close-knit group of three women. Debbi (03:01): Yes. Yes. What inspired you to write your first novel? Wendy (03:07): When I was in high school, my English teacher urged me to pursue a career in writing. So I went to school for journalism and I hated it. I quit at the end of the first year and the professor tried to talk me into staying. And I thought at the time it's because the grade average was going to go down because I had the highest marks in the class. But I learned years later that my sister worked with his wife and apparently didn't want me to leave because he thought I was very talented, which is a huge compliment. And I wish someone that time had said, you know, creative writing, try that. But I didn't. I waited until in 2009, I was laid off from General Motors. I was a security and fire supervisor at General Motors for a lot of years. Wendy (04:01): So when I was laid off I started doing a lot of reading and I thought, oh, I could write books like these. And that's why I started writing in 2011. And I wanted somebody that was, you know, troubled difficult just to show the strength that she gets from that. And it ended up, when people started reading my book, I started getting messages from women saying, you know, they've been through a lot of trauma in their own childhoods and how much Taylor's healing helped them to heal. And so that's become, you know, a purpose almost with my books is helping women to heal and help to empower them. I started getting messages from women saying, you know, they've been through a lot of trauma in their own childhoods and how much Taylor's healing helped them to heal. And so that's become, you know, a purpose almost with my books is helping women to heal and help to empower them. Debbi (04:45): I noticed that in your bio. I thought that was rather remarkable. And do you have a particular type of demographic in mind when you write, I hate to say, read your avatar, but do you think about that as you're writing these books? Wendy (05:01): A little bit. Yeah. I think most people do, Debbi Mack interviews crime and suspense writer Wendy Hewlett on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Debbi Mack interviews crime and suspense writer Wendy Hewlett on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (00:00): Hi, everyone. My guest today writes crime fiction with a hint of romance and strong female characters. So, all right. I like that. She's held a number of interesting jobs, which seems to be a trait among many writers that I know. She also has degrees in creative writing, forensic sciences, law, and security, to name a few. She has also pursued her lifelong dream of living in Edinburgh, Scotland, which is a really cool place. My guest today is crime writer, Wendy Hewlett. Hi Wendy. Thanks for being here today.<br /> <br /> Wendy (01:32): Hi, Debbi. Thanks for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:35): It's a pleasure. Believe me. You have two series as well as the book you're giving away Ailey of Skye. Is that how you pronounce it?<br /> <br /> Wendy (01:47): Yeah. Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:49): It's short for Aileen then. Is it?<br /> <br /> Wendy (01:52): Yeah, it is.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:53): I like that. It's my sister's middle name, and I just started the first in the Taylor Sinclair series, Saving Grace. She's a very interesting protagonist. Can you tell us more about the series and about Taylor Sinclair?<br /> <br /> Wendy (02:08): Sure. All of my characters that I write are very strong women and they become that way from the hardships that they have been through in their lives. And, and Taylor has been through probably more than most and, and of course that involves PTSD and, and overcoming that. So she's got a lot of issues and she spent most of her life living on the streets of Toronto and the first book in the series Saving Grace is her story of coming off the streets and the people that help her to do that who become very close friends, a close-knit group of three women.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:01): Yes. Yes. What inspired you to write your first novel?<br /> <br /> Wendy (03:07): When I was in high school, my English teacher urged me to pursue a career in writing. So I went to school for journalism and I hated it. I quit at the end of the first year and the professor tried to talk me into staying. And I thought at the time it's because the grade average was going to go down because I had the highest marks in the class. But I learned years later that my sister worked with his wife and apparently didn't want me to leave because he thought I was very talented, which is a huge compliment. And I wish someone that time had said, you know, creative writing, try that. But I didn't. I waited until in 2009, I was laid off from General Motors. I was a security and fire supervisor at General Motors for a lot of years.<br /> <br /> Wendy (04:01): So when I was laid off I started doing a lot of reading and I thought, oh, I could write books like these. And that's why I started writing in 2011. And I wanted somebody that was, you know, troubled difficult just to show the strength that she gets from that. And it ended up, when people started reading my book, I started getting messages from women saying, you know, they've been through a lot of trauma in their own childhoods and how much Taylor's healing helped them to heal. And so that's become, you know, a purpose almost with my books is helping women to heal and help to empower them.<br /> <br /> I started getting messages from women saying, you know, they've been through a lot of trauma in their own childhoods and how much Taylor's healing helped them to heal. And so that's become, you know, a purpose almost with my books is helping women to heal and help to empower them.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:45): I noticed that in your bio. I thought that was rather remarkable. Debbi Mack 23:30 Interview with Crime Writer Tom Vater: S. 6, Ep. 7 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-tom-vater-s-6-ep-7/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-tom-vater-s-6-ep-7 Sun, 27 Sep 2020 04:05:26 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20839 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Tom Vater on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. I originally ran this interview on my own YouTube channel. My apologies for any variations in the sound quality. Debbi (01:55): I'm interviewing another crime fiction author. His name is Tom Vater and he's a journalist and author. So he is located in Bangkok and writes about that place and writes some very interesting stuff. So I would like to welcome you on, on the channel Tom. Hi. Tom (02:21):Thanks, Debbi. Thanks very much for having me on the show. It's wonderful to meet you on this amazing technology we're using, and it's great to talk to you. You're about six, 7,000 miles away or even more so it's amazing that we can actually do this. You at the beginning of your day and me at the end of it. Debbi (02:42): Yeah, I know. I think I've always been amazed at this sort of thing. So my assumption is that you started with journalism and went into crime writing? Would that be correct? Tom (02:56): Well, actually it sort of happened hand in hand, because the first article I ever wrote for a newspaper was in 1997, for a paper in Nepal. And while I was there, I started thinking about writing my first novel, The Devil's Road to Kathmandu, which then eventually came out in 2004. So it, it kind of happened at the same time. But but I, I would say that, you know, between the pieces of fiction, I write, there are long gaps for professional reasons. And so mostly most of the time I have a day job, I do journalism. And when I have some months off, then I can sit down and write a novel. Debbi (03:43): So you're primarily a journalist who also does crime writing. Tom (03:48): Yeah. You could say that. I also own a a small publishing house Crime Wave Press, which is a crime fiction imprint based in Hong Kong, which does mostly books. And we've published about 32 titles by all sorts of authors, many of them from the U.S. So that's, that's my other gig. So I kind of do three different things. I'm a crime fiction writer. I, I'm a very small press publisher with just one partner and I've written four crime fiction novels and a bunch of short stories. Debbi (04:22): I'm interested in the fact that you do so much stuff. I'm also interested in, in the notion of, of, of, of a journalist going into this sort of thing, because the tradition of journalists going into fiction writing is historically something I've always been kind of intrigued by, which is why I majored in journalism actually, because of my interest in writing and in fiction in general. What made you choose crime fiction in particular as a genre? [G]enre fiction kind of makes it easy to, because it's got many established rules and tropes and conventions, and, and so in that sense, it's quite conservative. So you, as a writer, there's a lot of things to hold onto when you're writing your first novel, because it has to go a certain way, if you're gonna follow crime fiction conventions. Tom (05:01): I think there's probably several things. One is genre fiction kind of makes it easy to, because it's got many established rules and tropes and conventions, and, and so in that sense, it's quite conservative. So you, as a writer, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Tom Vater on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Tom Vater on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I originally ran this interview on my own YouTube channel. My apologies for any variations in the sound quality.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:55): I'm interviewing another crime fiction author. His name is Tom Vater and he's a journalist and author. So he is located in Bangkok and writes about that place and writes some very interesting stuff. So I would like to welcome you on, on the channel Tom. Hi.<br /> <br /> Tom (02:21):Thanks, Debbi. Thanks very much for having me on the show. It's wonderful to meet you on this amazing technology we're using, and it's great to talk to you. You're about six, 7,000 miles away or even more so it's amazing that we can actually do this. You at the beginning of your day and me at the end of it.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:42): Yeah, I know. I think I've always been amazed at this sort of thing. So my assumption is that you started with journalism and went into crime writing? Would that be correct?<br /> <br /> Tom (02:56): Well, actually it sort of happened hand in hand, because the first article I ever wrote for a newspaper was in 1997, for a paper in Nepal. And while I was there, I started thinking about writing my first novel, The Devil's Road to Kathmandu, which then eventually came out in 2004. So it, it kind of happened at the same time. But but I, I would say that, you know, between the pieces of fiction, I write, there are long gaps for professional reasons. And so mostly most of the time I have a day job, I do journalism. And when I have some months off, then I can sit down and write a novel.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:43): So you're primarily a journalist who also does crime writing.<br /> <br /> Tom (03:48): Yeah. You could say that. I also own a a small publishing house Crime Wave Press, which is a crime fiction imprint based in Hong Kong, which does mostly books. And we've published about 32 titles by all sorts of authors, many of them from the U.S. So that's, that's my other gig. So I kind of do three different things. I'm a crime fiction writer. I, I'm a very small press publisher with just one partner and I've written four crime fiction novels and a bunch of short stories.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:22): I'm interested in the fact that you do so much stuff. I'm also interested in, in the notion of, of, of, of a journalist going into this sort of thing, because the tradition of journalists going into fiction writing is historically something I've always been kind of intrigued by, which is why I majored in journalism actually, because of my interest in writing and in fiction in general. What made you choose crime fiction in particular as a genre?<br /> <br /> [G]enre fiction kind of makes it easy to, because it's got many established rules and tropes and conventions, and, and so in that sense, it's quite conservative. So you, as a writer, there's a lot of things to hold onto when you're writing your first novel, because it has to go a certain way, if you're gonna follow crime fiction conventions.<br /> <br /> Tom (05:01): I think there's probably several things. Debbi Mack 22:45 Interview with Crime Writer Jessie Chandler: S. 6, Ep. 6 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-jessie-chandler-s-6-ep-6/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-jessie-chandler-s-6-ep-6 Sun, 13 Sep 2020 04:05:40 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20704 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Jessie Chandler on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (01:44): Hi everyone. My guest today has written seven mysteries, including five in the Shay O'Hanlon caper series. Her latest book Quest for Redemption is the first in a new series. It also recently won an award, I believe. She is also the second author in a row on this show this season to be an artist as well as a writer. I'm pleased to have with me today mystery writer, Jessie Chandler. Hi Jessie. It's great to have you on. Jessie (02:16): Thank you so much. Thanks for having me. This is so exciting. Debbi (02:19): Well, this is a thrill for me. I mean so many artists and so many writers. This is wonderful. Jessie (02:26): It's a good, good thing to be in. Good area to be, a good place to be. Debbi (02:30): I think it is. Yeah. I think that graphic arts for one thing is just a fantastic area right now for many reasons. But let's see. Before we get to your latest book, tell us a little about your caper series, which you've compared to Stephanie Plum, I believe. So are you much in that kind of Janet Evanovich sort of humor? I've got a cute little old lady who loves to get in trouble with her neon high tops and her little mini backpack. She calls it her whacker to take care of people. It doesn't follow a lot of the, the romancey stuff of Janet Evanovich in any way. And it's got much more of a Midwest feel. Jessie (02:48): Sort of, yeah, a lot of physical comedy, a lot of slapstick stuff. I've got a cute little old lady who loves to get in trouble with her neon high tops and her little mini backpack. She calls it her whacker to take care of people. It doesn't follow a lot of the, the romancey stuff of Janet Evanovich in any way. And it's got much more of a Midwest feel. The big twist is the protagonist is a lesbian, which my hope in the series and it seemed to have panned out mostly so far from the reviews I've received and people talking to me that, you know, that LGBTQ people are the same as anybody else. And we have the same ups, the same downs. We have the same challenges and just, it's just a part of who she is. LGBTQ people are the same as anybody else. And we have the same ups, the same downs. We have the same challenges and just, it's just a part of who she is. Jessie (03:46): And that's been a good part of that series for me. I love to laugh and if I can dive into a book for just a few minutes, you know, I don't have a lot of time and I can read a little bit, have a good time, and then I can come back to it. That's just, it is so good. It is so good. And I don't think, especially now we have enough laughter, enough humor in our lives. There's so much serious stuff going on. So that is what, and we'll talk about that in a little bit, I imagine. Quest For Redemption is very opposite of that. It's very much darker and it was a big challenge, but I'm really excited. The next book I write will be the sixth in the Shay O'Hanlon caper series called Shanghai Murder. It goes out to Portland, Oregon, and there's some Shanghai Tunnels under the city and there's some coffee involved and some kidnapping and a little of this and a little of that. And it's going to be a lot of fun. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Jessie Chandler on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Jessie Chandler on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (01:44): Hi everyone. My guest today has written seven mysteries, including five in the Shay O'Hanlon caper series. Her latest book Quest for Redemption is the first in a new series. It also recently won an award, I believe. She is also the second author in a row on this show this season to be an artist as well as a writer. I'm pleased to have with me today mystery writer, Jessie Chandler. Hi Jessie. It's great to have you on.<br /> <br /> Jessie (02:16): Thank you so much. Thanks for having me. This is so exciting.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:19): Well, this is a thrill for me. I mean so many artists and so many writers. This is wonderful.<br /> <br /> Jessie (02:26): It's a good, good thing to be in. Good area to be, a good place to be.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:30): I think it is. Yeah. I think that graphic arts for one thing is just a fantastic area right now for many reasons. But let's see. Before we get to your latest book, tell us a little about your caper series, which you've compared to Stephanie Plum, I believe. So are you much in that kind of Janet Evanovich sort of humor?<br /> <br /> I've got a cute little old lady who loves to get in trouble with her neon high tops and her little mini backpack. She calls it her whacker to take care of people. It doesn't follow a lot of the, the romancey stuff of Janet Evanovich in any way. And it's got much more of a Midwest feel.<br /> <br /> Jessie (02:48): Sort of, yeah, a lot of physical comedy, a lot of slapstick stuff. I've got a cute little old lady who loves to get in trouble with her neon high tops and her little mini backpack. She calls it her whacker to take care of people. It doesn't follow a lot of the, the romancey stuff of Janet Evanovich in any way. And it's got much more of a Midwest feel. The big twist is the protagonist is a lesbian, which my hope in the series and it seemed to have panned out mostly so far from the reviews I've received and people talking to me that, you know, that LGBTQ people are the same as anybody else. And we have the same ups, the same downs. We have the same challenges and just, it's just a part of who she is.<br /> <br /> LGBTQ people are the same as anybody else. And we have the same ups, the same downs. We have the same challenges and just, it's just a part of who she is.<br /> <br /> Jessie (03:46): And that's been a good part of that series for me. I love to laugh and if I can dive into a book for just a few minutes, you know, I don't have a lot of time and I can read a little bit, have a good time, and then I can come back to it. That's just, it is so good. It is so good. And I don't think, especially now we have enough laughter, enough humor in our lives. There's so much serious stuff going on. So that is what, and we'll talk about that in a little bit, I imagine. Quest For Redemption is very opposite of that. It's very much darker and it was a big challenge, but I'm really excited. The next book I write will be the sixth in the Shay O'Hanlon caper series called Shanghai Murder. It goes out to Portland, Debbi Mack 31:11 Interview with Crime Writer Karen Neary Smithson: S. 6, Ep. 5 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-karen-neary-smithson-s-6-ep-5/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-karen-neary-smithson-s-6-ep-5 Sun, 30 Aug 2020 04:05:07 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20615 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Karen Neary Smithson on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (01:44): Hi, everyone. Today's guest is someone I got to know at a book signing we did it at a local diner, which just goes to show you can do a book signing anywhere that people will have you, at least back in the old days before we couldn't do things in public or in restaurants or whatever. Anyway, be that as it may I'm very pleased to have with me a guest who's a mystery author and an artist. You should definitely check out her website and not only for her books. I'm pleased to have with me, as I said, fellow Marylander and mystery author, Karen Neary Smithson. Hi, Karen. It's good to see you. Karen (02:31): Hi Debbi. I'm doing great. How about yourself? Debbi (02:33): Not too bad. Thanks. Doing, doing quite well, all things considered. And thank you for being here today. I appreciate it. Karen (02:42): Thank you for having me. Debbi (02:44): Sure thing. First of all, I had no idea until I looked at your website that you're also an artist. So art came before writing, is that correct? Karen (02:57): Yes, that's correct. Yes. I majored in college in art and art education and I was an art teacher for a number of years, so I just really want to be a painter. However, I had to be a little more practical. So, but because of that, I had a lot, I had a variety of jobs because I couldn't really get an art job. So it kind of gave me a lot of different kinds of experiences. So I'm doing a painting now and I have a couple more that I'm working on at home in my studio. So. Debbi (03:44): That's really cool that you're still painting, as well as writing. Karen (03:49): Yeah. So it's kind of a balance. It's, it's a little hard to balance it. So I'm still trying to work that out because when I'm writing, I just basically want to write. When I'm painting, I basically just want to paint, but I just finished writing a book. So I decided this summer, I was just going to focus on painting. Debbi (04:11): Well, that's really cool, because I kind of get what that's like. I do novel writing as well as screenwriting, and they're very different types of writing. So I always have to kind of balance which one I'm going to do when. Karen (04:28): Right. Debbi (04:30): Let's see. You've made some really interesting career choices. You were a child advocate, a human rights advocate and art educator. Is that correct? Karen (04:39): Yes. yes, I did those things. Yes. I worked in Florida for a nonprofit that worked for legislation for children's issues. And, in Howard County, I was the human rights commissioner for awhile. I also worked in the foster care system and I was a program coordinator for an independent living program. And then I was an art teacher. So I've done a lot of different kinds of things. Debbi (05:19): Well, that's fascinating. You probably know some of the attorneys that I've gotten to know in Howard County through your work for children. Karen (05:29): Oh, well, that was in Florida where I worked for the ... Debbi (05:35): I guess the human rights in Howard County. Karen (05:36): Researching the legislature. Yeah. Howard County Human Rights Commission. Yeah. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Karen Neary Smithson on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Karen Neary Smithson on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (01:44): Hi, everyone. Today's guest is someone I got to know at a book signing we did it at a local diner, which just goes to show you can do a book signing anywhere that people will have you, at least back in the old days before we couldn't do things in public or in restaurants or whatever. Anyway, be that as it may I'm very pleased to have with me a guest who's a mystery author and an artist. You should definitely check out her website and not only for her books. I'm pleased to have with me, as I said, fellow Marylander and mystery author, Karen Neary Smithson. Hi, Karen. It's good to see you.<br /> <br /> Karen (02:31): Hi Debbi. I'm doing great. How about yourself?<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:33): Not too bad. Thanks. Doing, doing quite well, all things considered. And thank you for being here today. I appreciate it.<br /> <br /> Karen (02:42): Thank you for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:44): Sure thing. First of all, I had no idea until I looked at your website that you're also an artist. So art came before writing, is that correct?<br /> <br /> Karen (02:57): Yes, that's correct. Yes. I majored in college in art and art education and I was an art teacher for a number of years, so I just really want to be a painter. However, I had to be a little more practical. So, but because of that, I had a lot, I had a variety of jobs because I couldn't really get an art job. So it kind of gave me a lot of different kinds of experiences. So I'm doing a painting now and I have a couple more that I'm working on at home in my studio. So.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:44): That's really cool that you're still painting, as well as writing.<br /> <br /> Karen (03:49): Yeah. So it's kind of a balance. It's, it's a little hard to balance it. So I'm still trying to work that out because when I'm writing, I just basically want to write. When I'm painting, I basically just want to paint, but I just finished writing a book. So I decided this summer, I was just going to focus on painting.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:11): Well, that's really cool, because I kind of get what that's like. I do novel writing as well as screenwriting, and they're very different types of writing. So I always have to kind of balance which one I'm going to do when.<br /> <br /> Karen (04:28): Right.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:30): Let's see. You've made some really interesting career choices. You were a child advocate, a human rights advocate and art educator. Is that correct?<br /> <br /> Karen (04:39): Yes. yes, I did those things. Yes. I worked in Florida for a nonprofit that worked for legislation for children's issues. And, in Howard County, I was the human rights commissioner for awhile. I also worked in the foster care system and I was a program coordinator for an independent living program. And then I was an art teacher. So I've done a lot of different kinds of things.<br /> <br /> Debbi (05:19): Well, that's fascinating. You probably know some of the attorneys that I've gotten to know in Howard County through your work for children. Debbi Mack 30:01 Interview with Crime Writer Ann Aptaker: S. 6, Ep. 4 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-ann-aptaker-s-6-ep-4/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-ann-aptaker-s-6-ep-4 Sun, 16 Aug 2020 04:05:08 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20451 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Ann Aptaker on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (01:44): Hi everyone. Today I have with me a crime fiction author who has actually worked for a private investigations firm. In one of my favorite places, San Rafael, California. Umm. Northern California. She is the author of the Cantor Gold mystery novels, which have won Lambda Literary and Goldie Awards. She's written short stories and flash fiction, which is cool, but that's not all. She's also been a curator, art writer, and exhibition designer for galleries and museums. Her most recent book is Murder and Gold. My guest today is Ann Aptaker. Hi, Ann. Thanks so much for being here today. Ann (02:29): Hi, how are you? Debbi (02:31): Okay. How are you doing with all this stuff going on? Ann (02:35): I'm hanging in there, doing what we all do with nothing but time on our hands. Those of us who are authors. We write. So that's what I'm doing with myself. Debbi (02:48): I know the feeling. Yeah. Ann (02:49): I'm sure you do. Debbi (02:53): I thought it was interesting that you worked in the art world as a writer and curator, and also have a great attention to architectural and other details in your writing and really put the reader in the place that you're writing about. Think there's a connection there? Ann (03:00): There is, especially in crime fiction of the sort of my Cantor Gold books, where she is an art thief and a smuggler. She steals art. And of course, to be a good thief, you have to have a number of skills, but one of those skills is understanding architecture because you have to be able to understand how a building works so you can get in and out of it in an efficient manner without getting caught and without, you know, sending off alarms and so on. So my years as an art historian and a curator studying not only art, but also the history of architecture, my understanding at least at that level of buildings helps me helps me understand my protagonist and how she's able to steal things. She steals art. And of course, to be a good thief, you have to have a number of skills, but one of those skills is understanding architecture because you have to be able to understand how a building works so you can get in and out of it in an efficient manner without getting caught and without, you know, sending off alarms and so on. So my years as an art historian and a curator studying not only art, but also the history of architecture, my understanding at least at that level of buildings helps me helps me understand my protagonist and how she's able to steal things. Ann (04:07): And in the most recent of the books Flesh and Gold, she actually does use her architectural knowledge in, in two scenes where she has to be able to maneuver in one scene. She has to maneuver through a building and in another scene, she has to maneuver on the exterior of a building through a neighborhood. So she really has to understand how buildings work. Debbi (04:32): That's fantastic. And it really gives a person a window into what things were like then, as opposed to now. Ann (04:40): Absolutely. The books take place in the 1950s. So she didn't have a computer. She couldn't get her, you know, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Ann Aptaker on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Ann Aptaker on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> We did it again! This week, there’s a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (01:44): Hi everyone. Today I have with me a crime fiction author who has actually worked for a private investigations firm. In one of my favorite places, San Rafael, California. Umm. Northern California. She is the author of the Cantor Gold mystery novels, which have won Lambda Literary and Goldie Awards. She's written short stories and flash fiction, which is cool, but that's not all. She's also been a curator, art writer, and exhibition designer for galleries and museums. Her most recent book is Murder and Gold. My guest today is Ann Aptaker. Hi, Ann. Thanks so much for being here today.<br /> <br /> Ann (02:29): Hi, how are you?<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:31): Okay. How are you doing with all this stuff going on?<br /> <br /> Ann (02:35): I'm hanging in there, doing what we all do with nothing but time on our hands. Those of us who are authors. We write. So that's what I'm doing with myself.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:48): I know the feeling. Yeah.<br /> <br /> Ann (02:49): I'm sure you do.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:53): I thought it was interesting that you worked in the art world as a writer and curator, and also have a great attention to architectural and other details in your writing and really put the reader in the place that you're writing about. Think there's a connection there?<br /> <br /> Ann (03:00): There is, especially in crime fiction of the sort of my Cantor Gold books, where she is an art thief and a smuggler. She steals art. And of course, to be a good thief, you have to have a number of skills, but one of those skills is understanding architecture because you have to be able to understand how a building works so you can get in and out of it in an efficient manner without getting caught and without, you know, sending off alarms and so on. So my years as an art historian and a curator studying not only art, but also the history of architecture, my understanding at least at that level of buildings helps me helps me understand my protagonist and how she's able to steal things.<br /> <br /> She steals art. And of course, to be a good thief, you have to have a number of skills, but one of those skills is understanding architecture because you have to be able to understand how a building works so you can get in and out of it in an efficient manner without getting caught and without, you know, sending off alarms and so on. So my years as an art historian and a curator studying not only art, but also the history of architecture, my understanding at least at that level of buildings helps me helps me understand my protagonist and how she's able to steal things.<br /> <br /> Ann (04:07): And in the most recent of the books Flesh and Gold, she actually does use her architectural knowledge in, in two scenes where she has to be able to maneuver in one scene. She has to maneuver through a building and in another scene, she has to maneuver on the exterior of a building through a neighborhood. So she really has to understand how buildings work.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:32): That's fantastic. Debbi Mack 33:19 Interview with Thriller Writer Andrew Allan: S. 6, Ep. 3 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-thriller-writer-andrew-allan/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-thriller-writer-andrew-allan Sun, 02 Aug 2020 04:03:18 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20399 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andrew Allan on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. We did it again! This week, there's a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (01:43): Hi everyone. My guest is the author of the Walt Asher thriller series. He also writes Grindhouse Pulp, which we've gotta talk about. He is an infomercial writer and director. He's also into wild cult movies, making them I believe, and runs a website called Dailygrindhouse.com. My guest today is Andrew Allan. Hi Andrew. Thanks for being here. Andrew (02:11): Hey, Debbi. Thanks for having me. Debbi (02:13): Sure thing. I love your resume. I mean, your bio is just fascinating to me cause I love film as well as books. I assumed that you were an infomercial writer-director before you started writing books. Andrew (02:28): Yes. Yeah. I, my career is a little bit weird in the sense that I went to film school and then I broke into commercials while I was working on developing some movies. And then I ended up getting a job at the home shopping network, which is based here in St. Pete Florida. And it's as bizarre as everyone presumes it is, but it was a really great experience. And I learned how to do a lot of things, including sell on TV and that morphed into doing infomercials, which is selling on TV. So, and I have to say, I love it as ridiculous as it sounds, it's a great profession. Debbi (03:08): I mean, that sounds really cool actually. What made you decide to do infomercials and what prompted you to start writing books? Andrew (03:20): Money prompted me to start doing infomercials. One cause you know, we all need it and we all like it. But the real reason was like I said, I learned to basically sell on television when I was at HSN and that is a natural transition into infomercials. And when I decided to leave HSN, I knew I wanted to make my writing or sorry, make my living still writing and directing and producing commercials. And what was great about infomercials was that it was a niche. So instead of just saying, Hey, I'm a commercial writer and there's 10,000 other people I'm competing with, I decided to be an infomercial writer and you know, there's maybe 10 people I'm competing with, so now I can like authentically say I'm one of the top infomercial writers in the world and I've got a ton of experience and I've done thousands of commercials in the past decade and all that sort of stuff. (04:24) So it's, it's great. And that's how that came to be. The reason I started writing books was because for a number of reasons. One, I was creatively frustrated. I had been making movies and I had been writing screenplays, which were fun. And some of them got made, some of them didn't, but all of them required collaboration. And I had reached a point where I didn't really want to collaborate anymore, at least for a while. I needed a beather and that's even on projects that I absolutely loved. A movie that I was making with my best friend. And even then, like we would get in arguments about it and I just needed a break from that. So I wanted to do something on my own and that's when I decided to write a book, I had a story kind of kicking around that I'd never been able to turn into a script. I was creatively frustrated. I had been making movies and I had been writing screenplays, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andrew Allan on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andrew Allan on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> We did it again! This week, there's a transcription of the show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (01:43): Hi everyone. My guest is the author of the Walt Asher thriller series. He also writes Grindhouse Pulp, which we've gotta talk about. He is an infomercial writer and director. He's also into wild cult movies, making them I believe, and runs a website called Dailygrindhouse.com. My guest today is Andrew Allan. Hi Andrew. Thanks for being here.<br /> <br /> Andrew (02:11): Hey, Debbi. Thanks for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi (02:13): Sure thing. I love your resume. I mean, your bio is just fascinating to me cause I love film as well as books. I assumed that you were an infomercial writer-director before you started writing books.<br /> <br /> Andrew (02:28): Yes. Yeah. I, my career is a little bit weird in the sense that I went to film school and then I broke into commercials while I was working on developing some movies. And then I ended up getting a job at the home shopping network, which is based here in St. Pete Florida. And it's as bizarre as everyone presumes it is, but it was a really great experience. And I learned how to do a lot of things, including sell on TV and that morphed into doing infomercials, which is selling on TV. So, and I have to say, I love it as ridiculous as it sounds, it's a great profession.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:08): I mean, that sounds really cool actually. What made you decide to do infomercials and what prompted you to start writing books?<br /> <br /> Andrew (03:20): Money prompted me to start doing infomercials. One cause you know, we all need it and we all like it. But the real reason was like I said, I learned to basically sell on television when I was at HSN and that is a natural transition into infomercials. And when I decided to leave HSN, I knew I wanted to make my writing or sorry, make my living still writing and directing and producing commercials. And what was great about infomercials was that it was a niche. So instead of just saying, Hey, I'm a commercial writer and there's 10,000 other people I'm competing with, I decided to be an infomercial writer and you know, there's maybe 10 people I'm competing with, so now I can like authentically say I'm one of the top infomercial writers in the world and I've got a ton of experience and I've done thousands of commercials in the past decade and all that sort of stuff.<br /> <br /> (04:24) So it's, it's great. And that's how that came to be. The reason I started writing books was because for a number of reasons. One, I was creatively frustrated. I had been making movies and I had been writing screenplays, which were fun. And some of them got made, some of them didn't, but all of them required collaboration. And I had reached a point where I didn't really want to collaborate anymore, at least for a while. I needed a beather and that's even on projects that I absolutely loved. A movie that I was making with my best friend. And even then, like we would get in arguments about it and I just needed a break from that. So I wanted to do something on my own and that's when I decided to write a book, Debbi Mack 24:56 Interview with Crime Writer Mark S. Bacon: S. 6, Ep. 2 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-mark-s-bacon-s-6-ep-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-mark-s-bacon-s-6-ep-2 Sun, 19 Jul 2020 04:05:40 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20366 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Mark S. Bacon on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. Amazingly, this week I managed to scrape up transcription show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. Debbi (01:44): Hi everyone. Our guest today started his writing career as a police reporter, and apparently one of his stories became an important part of a big lengthy murder trial. He's also done advertising and marketing and worked as a copywriter for Knott's Berry Farm. That's a familiar name to me cause I used to live in California. Not only has he written and published three mysteries and the book of flash crime fiction called Cops Crooks and Other Stories in 100 Words, but he's written business books, including Do-it-Yourself Direct Marketing, which was named Best Business Book of the Year by Library Journal and made the Book of the Month Club. His articles have appeared in major newspapers, including my own favorite, the Washington Post, and his latest novel is The Marijuana Murders. His name is Mark Bacon. Hi Mark. Thanks again for being so patient as to wait long enough for this interview. Mark (03:17): Thanks for having me. Well, the last few months, I've just been hanging around like everybody else. Debbi (03:17): Oh yeah, yeah. That's what we're all doing. We're all hanging around and zooming. A lot of the zooming going on. Um, let's see. I love your shirt by the way. That's great. Um, very, very festive looking. Um, and uh, you have three books out so far in the Nostalgia City Mysteries, is that correct? Mark (03:17): That's right. I'm working on number four. Debbi (03:20): And that's for the series also? Mark (03:21): Correct. Debbi (03:23): Awesome. Now you said the inspiration for the series came from working at Knott's Berry Farm. Can you talk about that a little bit? Mark (03:31): Sure. Early in my career, I was a copywriter for Knott’s Berry Farm and I wrote ads and commercials, but occasionally I would get a chance to go out into the park and work on special events. And I got to meet some of the costumed employees who entertain the guests, people who wore those giant heads and people who were gunslingers and so on. And so I got to know a little bit about what it's like behind the scenes at a theme park. And I always thought that it might be an interesting place to hold a murder mystery or to set a murder mystery because a theme park is great during the day. But at night when everybody's gone, when the rides are stopped, everything is silent. And the only motion is the shadows of the trees. It can be a little scary and I thought it'd make a great place to kill people. [A] theme park is great during the day. But at night when everybody's gone, when the rides are stopped, everything is silent. And the only motion is the shadows of the trees. It can be a little scary and I thought it'd make a great place to kill people. Debbi (04:34): That's cool. I like that. Let's see. Have you ever seen the show Playing God in Central Florida, something like that. [It's On Becoming God in Central Florida.] Mark (04:46): No, it doesn't, it doesn't ring a bell. Debbi (04:49): It revolves around a woman who works at a theme park. That's the only reason I ask. Mark (04:54): Oh, okay. Well there's lots of those in Florida. Debbi (04:56): Yeah. it's, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Mark S. Bacon on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Mark S. Bacon on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> Amazingly, this week I managed to scrape up transcription show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (01:44): Hi everyone. Our guest today started his writing career as a police reporter, and apparently one of his stories became an important part of a big lengthy murder trial. He's also done advertising and marketing and worked as a copywriter for Knott's Berry Farm. That's a familiar name to me cause I used to live in California. Not only has he written and published three mysteries and the book of flash crime fiction called Cops Crooks and Other Stories in 100 Words, but he's written business books, including Do-it-Yourself Direct Marketing, which was named Best Business Book of the Year by Library Journal and made the Book of the Month Club. His articles have appeared in major newspapers, including my own favorite, the Washington Post, and his latest novel is The Marijuana Murders. His name is Mark Bacon. Hi Mark. Thanks again for being so patient as to wait long enough for this interview.<br /> <br /> Mark (03:17): Thanks for having me. Well, the last few months, I've just been hanging around like everybody else.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:17): Oh yeah, yeah. That's what we're all doing. We're all hanging around and zooming. A lot of the zooming going on. Um, let's see. I love your shirt by the way. That's great. Um, very, very festive looking. Um, and uh, you have three books out so far in the Nostalgia City Mysteries, is that correct?<br /> <br /> Mark (03:17): That's right. I'm working on number four.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:20): And that's for the series also?<br /> <br /> Mark (03:21): Correct.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:23): Awesome. Now you said the inspiration for the series came from working at Knott's Berry Farm. Can you talk about that a little bit?<br /> <br /> Mark (03:31): Sure. Early in my career, I was a copywriter for Knott’s Berry Farm and I wrote ads and commercials, but occasionally I would get a chance to go out into the park and work on special events. And I got to meet some of the costumed employees who entertain the guests, people who wore those giant heads and people who were gunslingers and so on. And so I got to know a little bit about what it's like behind the scenes at a theme park. And I always thought that it might be an interesting place to hold a murder mystery or to set a murder mystery because a theme park is great during the day. But at night when everybody's gone, when the rides are stopped, everything is silent. And the only motion is the shadows of the trees. It can be a little scary and I thought it'd make a great place to kill people.<br /> <br /> [A] theme park is great during the day. But at night when everybody's gone, when the rides are stopped, everything is silent. And the only motion is the shadows of the trees. It can be a little scary and I thought it'd make a great place to kill people.<br /> <br /> Debbi (04:34): That's cool. I like that. Let's see. Have you ever seen the show Playing God in Central Florida, something like that. [It's On Becoming God in Central Florida.]<br /> <br /> Mark (04:46): No, it doesn't, it doesn't ring a bell.<br /> Debbi Mack 32:07 Interview with Crime Writer Saralyn Richard: S. 6, Ep. 1 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-saralyn-richard-s-6-ep-1/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-saralyn-richard-s-6-ep-1 Sun, 05 Jul 2020 04:05:27 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20336 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Saralyn Richard on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. Amazingly, this week I managed to scrape up transcription show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF. [00:00:00] Debbi: Hi everyone. And welcome to the first episode of Season Six of the Crime Cafe. It's great to be back. And I can't believe I've done this for five years, really. Before I introduce our guest, I'd like to make one little announcement. [00:00:16] As you may know, the Crime Cafe has a Patreon page. Where patrons help out with micropayments. And you get perks in return. As part of that, I've been sharing pre-publication drafts of my work. So what I'm doing as a result is broadening the Patreon page’s scope to expand into my own work as well. [00:00:39] Most of my books are crime fiction, so it seems to fit. And anyway, the Patreon page has been rebranded as Debbi Mack's Multimedia Experience. And to know why you really have to check it out. I'm writing novels, screenplays, blog posts, reviews, and making short videos. So I'm up to a lot these days, but the podcast is still called the Crime Cafe and will continue to be called that. [00:01:05] That hasn't changed. The focus here as always is on the absolute awesome variety of authors who write crime, suspense, and thriller stories: page turners and puzzles, if you will. So our guest for today is an award-winning author of mystery and kidlit—I gotta ask about that—who hopes change the world one book at the time. Now that is a mission statement I love. Her latest novel in the Detectives Parrott mystery series is called A Palette for Love and Murder. Her other books include Murder in the One Percent and Naughty Nana. She also teaches creative writing and literature at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Our guest today is Saralyn Richard. Hi, Saralyn. It's great to have you on today. [00:01:56] Saralyn: Thank you so much, Debbi. It's wonderful to be here. [00:01:59] Debbi: Well, I'm so glad you are here. And I just think it's intriguing that you write mysteries and kidlit. Tell us about the kidlit. What is it? Is it a type of children's book and what made you interested in it? [00:02:13] Saralyn:  Well kidlit is children's books. This is my first book, Naughty Nana. And it's a little bit of a mystery, too. There's a mystery that goes on inside of this picture book. And I actually have the dog, Nana. You just met her a little bit before we started this podcast. And she really was naughty. [00:02:41] So I was making a list of all the nasty things she was doing, and I decided to turn that into a book. And that was actually the first book that I published. That's really, that's what kidlit is. [00:02:56] Debbi: That is so interesting because I've written a young adult novel that's good for middle graders. And it also has a mystery element to it, though it is not what I would call strictly speaking a genre mystery. So I think mystery and suspense tend to work their way into other types of fiction as well. I think that's really interesting. What drew you toward writing mysteries in particular? [00:03:23] Saralyn: I'm a very eclectic reader. But if given my choice, I'll choose a mystery over anything else. [00:03:33] I think because I love the intellectual and emotional puzzle that a mystery presents, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Saralyn Richard on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Saralyn Richard on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> Amazingly, this week I managed to scrape up transcription show notes. Click here to download a copy in PDF.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [00:00:00] Debbi: Hi everyone. And welcome to the first episode of Season Six of the Crime Cafe. It's great to be back. And I can't believe I've done this for five years, really. Before I introduce our guest, I'd like to make one little announcement.<br /> <br /> [00:00:16] As you may know, the Crime Cafe has a Patreon page. Where patrons help out with micropayments. And you get perks in return. As part of that, I've been sharing pre-publication drafts of my work. So what I'm doing as a result is broadening the Patreon page’s scope to expand into my own work as well.<br /> <br /> [00:00:39] Most of my books are crime fiction, so it seems to fit. And anyway, the Patreon page has been rebranded as Debbi Mack's Multimedia Experience. And to know why you really have to check it out. I'm writing novels, screenplays, blog posts, reviews, and making short videos. So I'm up to a lot these days, but the podcast is still called the Crime Cafe and will continue to be called that.<br /> <br /> [00:01:05] That hasn't changed. The focus here as always is on the absolute awesome variety of authors who write crime, suspense, and thriller stories: page turners and puzzles, if you will. So our guest for today is an award-winning author of mystery and kidlit—I gotta ask about that—who hopes change the world one book at the time. Now that is a mission statement I love. Her latest novel in the Detectives Parrott mystery series is called A Palette for Love and Murder. Her other books include Murder in the One Percent and Naughty Nana. She also teaches creative writing and literature at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Our guest today is Saralyn Richard. Hi, Saralyn. It's great to have you on today.<br /> <br /> [00:01:56] Saralyn: Thank you so much, Debbi. It's wonderful to be here.<br /> <br /> [00:01:59] Debbi: Well, I'm so glad you are here. And I just think it's intriguing that you write mysteries and kidlit. Tell us about the kidlit. What is it? Is it a type of children's book and what made you interested in it?<br /> <br /> [00:02:13] Saralyn:  Well kidlit is children's books. This is my first book, Naughty Nana. And it's a little bit of a mystery, too. There's a mystery that goes on inside of this picture book. And I actually have the dog, Nana. You just met her a little bit before we started this podcast. And she really was naughty.<br /> <br /> [00:02:41] So I was making a list of all the nasty things she was doing, and I decided to turn that into a book. And that was actually the first book that I published. That's really, that's what kidlit is.<br /> <br /> [00:02:56] Debbi: That is so interesting because I've written a young adult novel that's good for middle graders. And it also has a mystery element to it, though it is not what I would call strictly speaking a genre mystery. So I think mystery and suspense tend to work their way into other types of fiction as well. I think that's really interesting. What drew you toward writing mysteries in particular?<br /> <br /> Debbi Mack clean 31:07 Interview with Crime Writer Jeffery Deaver — Bonus Episode https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-jeffery-deaver-bonus-episode/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-jeffery-deaver-bonus-episode Sun, 24 May 2020 04:05:30 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20199 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Jeffery Deaver on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. Amazingly, this week I managed to scrape up transcription show notes. I hope to continue doing this. Debbi (01:02): Hi everyone. Today's episode is kind of a special bonus episode. The podcast is between seasons but today's guest is well worth squeezing in. This author has written more than 35 novels, three short story collections and a nonfiction law book. He is a former journalist, attorney and folk singer. That's an awesome combination, in my book. He's been nominated and granted numerous awards and he's an international bestselling author. My guest today is Jeffery Deaver. Hi Jeffery. Thanks so much for being here today. Jeffery (01:41): Hello, Debbi. Very happy to talk to you. Debbi (01:43): Wonderful. So you worked in law. What kind of law did you practice? Jeffery (01:52): Well, it's funny. People know I write criminal books, so they say, well, Jeff, you must've been a criminal [lawyer], and I say I represented banks. You draw your own conclusions from that. I was a Wall Street lawyer and did represent banks as a matter of fact, did mostly a finance law. But you know, I've always wanted to be a writer and always wanted to write commercial fiction ever since I was a young boy. And so that was my career path, but I knew that writers are not progenies. They, they need to live life a little while. You know, Mozart, I'm sure, was composing very young and Jackson Pollock was spattering paint on his mother's floor probably at a young age. But I knew I was going to have to work and make money doing other things and live life. People know I write criminal books, so they say, well, Jeff, you must've been a criminal [lawyer], and I say I represented banks. You draw your own conclusions from that. (02:46): And so I picked journalism first and then I decided to try law for a little while. And by the time I was in my thirties and I felt I was comfortable enough to begin writing popular fiction, I I quit those jobs and that was 30 years ago. I've been writing for 35 years, but writing full time for 30. Debbi (03:07): It's almost eerie the way your career path has been similar to mine. I used to practice law also. When I quit, it was so nice to do what I really wanted to do, which was to write. Jeffery (03:21): Yeah. Debbi (03:22): It's a wonderful feeling. Jeffery (03:24): Can I ask what, what type of law you practiced? Debbi (03:27): I did different things. I started off with Social Security doing disability defense work, and then worked at a law firm, ended up in land use and zoning. But then from there went to EPA. I worked with the Office of General Counsel, which is a very interesting job. Jeffery (03:48): I think it would be fascinating. Debbi (03:50): It was fascinating. But unfortunately they moved the office to a place even farther from where I lived. I had to make a decision. So I decided to go into practice for myself for a while, which was extremely educational. Jeffery (04:06): It was. You pick up a lot of stories for books, don't you? Debbi (04:09): Oh my gosh. Well yeah, I could go on, but I won't. I want to talk about you. Yeah. You worked as a journalist also. In what ways do you think your work as a journalist and a lawyer affected your writing? Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Jeffery Deaver on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Jeffery Deaver on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> Amazingly, this week I managed to scrape up transcription show notes. I hope to continue doing this.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi (01:02): Hi everyone. Today's episode is kind of a special bonus episode. The podcast is between seasons but today's guest is well worth squeezing in. This author has written more than 35 novels, three short story collections and a nonfiction law book. He is a former journalist, attorney and folk singer. That's an awesome combination, in my book. He's been nominated and granted numerous awards and he's an international bestselling author. My guest today is Jeffery Deaver. Hi Jeffery. Thanks so much for being here today.<br /> <br /> Jeffery (01:41): Hello, Debbi. Very happy to talk to you.<br /> <br /> Debbi (01:43): Wonderful. So you worked in law. What kind of law did you practice?<br /> <br /> Jeffery (01:52): Well, it's funny. People know I write criminal books, so they say, well, Jeff, you must've been a criminal [lawyer], and I say I represented banks. You draw your own conclusions from that. I was a Wall Street lawyer and did represent banks as a matter of fact, did mostly a finance law. But you know, I've always wanted to be a writer and always wanted to write commercial fiction ever since I was a young boy. And so that was my career path, but I knew that writers are not progenies. They, they need to live life a little while. You know, Mozart, I'm sure, was composing very young and Jackson Pollock was spattering paint on his mother's floor probably at a young age. But I knew I was going to have to work and make money doing other things and live life.<br /> <br /> People know I write criminal books, so they say, well, Jeff, you must've been a criminal [lawyer], and I say I represented banks. You draw your own conclusions from that.<br /> <br /> (02:46): And so I picked journalism first and then I decided to try law for a little while. And by the time I was in my thirties and I felt I was comfortable enough to begin writing popular fiction, I I quit those jobs and that was 30 years ago. I've been writing for 35 years, but writing full time for 30.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:07): It's almost eerie the way your career path has been similar to mine. I used to practice law also. When I quit, it was so nice to do what I really wanted to do, which was to write.<br /> <br /> Jeffery (03:21): Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:22): It's a wonderful feeling.<br /> <br /> Jeffery (03:24): Can I ask what, what type of law you practiced?<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:27): I did different things. I started off with Social Security doing disability defense work, and then worked at a law firm, ended up in land use and zoning. But then from there went to EPA. I worked with the Office of General Counsel, which is a very interesting job.<br /> <br /> Jeffery (03:48): I think it would be fascinating.<br /> <br /> Debbi (03:50): It was fascinating. But unfortunately they moved the office to a place even farther from where I lived. I had to make a decision. So I decided to go into practice for myself for a while, which was extremely educational.<br /> <br /> Jeffery (04:06): It was. Debbi Mack clean 23:20 Interview with Crime Writer Richard Armstrong — S. 5, Ep. 23 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-richard-armstrong-s-5-ep-23/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-richard-armstrong-s-5-ep-23 Sun, 12 Apr 2020 04:05:16 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20132 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Richard Armstrong on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I've included a few excerpts from the interview. Here are a few excerpts from the interview: On copywriting and con men: "I have a free giveaway, if you visit my website. The book, as you know, deals with con men and confidence games, that sort of thing. And there's a book on there ... there's a booklet called "How to Talk Anybody Into Anything: Secrets of the World's Greatest Con Men." It's about a hundred pages long. It's a PDF. You can download it instantly for free. There's no catch or obligation or anything." "While I don't believe that copywriters are con men, we do have a tendency to use a lot of the same techniques. The key difference between a copywriter and a con man is that copywriters are not criminals. We don't have what's known in the law as criminal intent. We're just trying to sell you a product. And, hopefully, that product will be worth more than what you paid for it, and we'll both go away happy. A win-win situation. Whereas the con man is simply trying to essentially steal money from you without you knowing it. ... I think [the free booklet] is a very interesting book and even a useful book if you're in any business in which persuasion is part of your job, and that includes many, many different types of jobs." On copywriting and fiction writing: "There's a lot of connections between copywriting and fiction. This is my second novel, but in copywriting, we've long recognized the importance of telling stories, the importance of being mysterious, of invoking curiosity in the reader---a number of things we have to do in advertising that are skills that are very, very useful to the novelist. And vice versa." About his novel, The Don Con: "I was an actor years ago, when I was younger, and way back in 1972, I was in a play, and ... I did make a very good friend in that cast by the name of Jonathan Frakes. And Jonathan went on to be pretty well-known, famous as the second-in-command of Star Trek: The Next Generation ... Patrick Stewart was the commander of the ship, and my friend Jonathan was the second-in-command. And one night, not that long ago---four or five years ago---I was having dinner with him and my wife. And I hadn't seen him in a while and I was kind of curious about what he was up to, because I knew he wasn't acting much, because I wasn't seeing him on television anymore. So we were asking what he was doing, and he said he does a lot of directing in television these days, because he's also a director. "But he said, 'You know, one of the ways that I make income is that I go to fan conventions, particularly Star Trek conventions, and I sign autographs for money.' And, silly me, I had never heard of this before. I didn't know such things existed. But he told me that he didn't know they existed, either, until a couple of years into the show, and his agent said, 'I think you should go to this Star Trek convention.' And he said to his agent, 'Why would I want to do that?" And the agent said, 'Well ... do you like money?' So, he agreed to do it, and he was absolutely gobsmacked by how much money he made." "Not only was it kind of an amusing story, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Richard Armstrong on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Richard Armstrong on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I've included a few excerpts from the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Here are a few excerpts from the interview:<br /> <br /> On copywriting and con men:<br /> <br /> "I have a free giveaway, if you visit my website. The book, as you know, deals with con men and confidence games, that sort of thing. And there's a book on there ... there's a booklet called "How to Talk Anybody Into Anything: Secrets of the World's Greatest Con Men." It's about a hundred pages long. It's a PDF. You can download it instantly for free. There's no catch or obligation or anything."<br /> <br /> "While I don't believe that copywriters are con men, we do have a tendency to use a lot of the same techniques. The key difference between a copywriter and a con man is that copywriters are not criminals. We don't have what's known in the law as criminal intent. We're just trying to sell you a product. And, hopefully, that product will be worth more than what you paid for it, and we'll both go away happy. A win-win situation. Whereas the con man is simply trying to essentially steal money from you without you knowing it. ... I think [the free booklet] is a very interesting book and even a useful book if you're in any business in which persuasion is part of your job, and that includes many, many different types of jobs."<br /> <br /> On copywriting and fiction writing:<br /> <br /> "There's a lot of connections between copywriting and fiction. This is my second novel, but in copywriting, we've long recognized the importance of telling stories, the importance of being mysterious, of invoking curiosity in the reader---a number of things we have to do in advertising that are skills that are very, very useful to the novelist. And vice versa."<br /> <br /> About his novel, The Don Con:<br /> <br /> "I was an actor years ago, when I was younger, and way back in 1972, I was in a play, and ... I did make a very good friend in that cast by the name of Jonathan Frakes. And Jonathan went on to be pretty well-known, famous as the second-in-command of Star Trek: The Next Generation ... Patrick Stewart was the commander of the ship, and my friend Jonathan was the second-in-command. And one night, not that long ago---four or five years ago---I was having dinner with him and my wife. And I hadn't seen him in a while and I was kind of curious about what he was up to, because I knew he wasn't acting much, because I wasn't seeing him on television anymore. So we were asking what he was doing, and he said he does a lot of directing in television these days, because he's also a director.<br /> <br /> "But he said, 'You know, one of the ways that I make income is that I go to fan conventions, particularly Star Trek conventions, and I sign autographs for money.' And, silly me, I had never heard of this before. I didn't know such things existed. But he told me that he didn't know they existed, either, until a couple of years into the show, and his agent said, 'I think you should go to this Star Trek convention.' And he said to his agent, 'Why would I want to do that? Debbi Mack clean 31:18 Interview with Crime Writer Bob Hartley — S. 5, Ep. 22 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-bob-hartley-s-5-ep-22/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-bob-hartley-s-5-ep-22 Sun, 29 Mar 2020 04:05:54 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20087 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Bob Hartley on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I have tried to note at what time various discussion topics come up in include a few teaser quotes from the interview. "I grew up on the far West Side of Chicago, and that was the world that I grew up within. ... During that time, there was a lot of economic turmoil going on in the Seventies, and I witnessed it. A lot of racial turmoil, as well, and I witnessed all of that, and that has put a mark on me. I have difficulty writing about anything else." "Although I'm certainly glad that [North and Central is] looked upon as a noir novel---it captures that time and so forth---I think of it as a metaphor for the system itself. A lot of what we're experiencing right now. A lot of low-paying jobs, a lot of people without any real ... well, without a lot of hope." "Human beings like to think they're in control, but in reality, as we found out recently, you're not in control. And so we scramble to find some kind of control when we really don't have it. ... So, we're constantly trying to do that, but in reality, sometimes the situation ... you have no control." About the influence of Chicago writer, Nelson Algren: "When I read his books, I saw somebody who was looking at a neighborhood and actually writing about people who aren't represented in fiction very often and captured it very well. ... Even the minor character, if you were to follow that character, if you were to follow that character out the door, you would be experiencing a story that might just be as compelling as the one you're reading. That's tough to do, and Algren did it very well. If you're saying I've come close to it, that's great." There's more where that came from! :) Check out the podcast! And please support the podcaster! :) I have a special offer running until midnight April 7, 2020! Check it out!   Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Bob Hartley on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Bob Hartley on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I have tried to note at what time various discussion topics come up in include a few teaser quotes from the interview.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> "I grew up on the far West Side of Chicago, and that was the world that I grew up within. ... During that time, there was a lot of economic turmoil going on in the Seventies, and I witnessed it. A lot of racial turmoil, as well, and I witnessed all of that, and that has put a mark on me. I have difficulty writing about anything else."<br /> <br /> "Although I'm certainly glad that [North and Central is] looked upon as a noir novel---it captures that time and so forth---I think of it as a metaphor for the system itself. A lot of what we're experiencing right now. A lot of low-paying jobs, a lot of people without any real ... well, without a lot of hope."<br /> <br /> "Human beings like to think they're in control, but in reality, as we found out recently, you're not in control. And so we scramble to find some kind of control when we really don't have it. ... So, we're constantly trying to do that, but in reality, sometimes the situation ... you have no control."<br /> <br /> About the influence of Chicago writer, Nelson Algren: "When I read his books, I saw somebody who was looking at a neighborhood and actually writing about people who aren't represented in fiction very often and captured it very well. ... Even the minor character, if you were to follow that character, if you were to follow that character out the door, you would be experiencing a story that might just be as compelling as the one you're reading. That's tough to do, and Algren did it very well. If you're saying I've come close to it, that's great."<br /> <br /> There's more where that came from! :) Check out the podcast! And please support the podcaster! :) I have a special offer running until midnight April 7, 2020! Check it out!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />   Debbi Mack clean 29:22 Interview with Crime Writer June Trop — S. 5, Ep. 21 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-june-trop-s-5-ep-21/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-june-trop-s-5-ep-21 Sun, 15 Mar 2020 04:05:32 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=20033 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer June Trop on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I have tried to note at what time various discussion topics come up in the recording. [02:40] June talks about how she discovered Maria Hebrea, the woman who inspired her protagonist, Miriam bat Isaac, while researching a paper for a class on the history of chemistry. [04:43] June describes the nature of her protagonist, Miriam bat Isaac, a female alchemist, along with the illegal nature of her work. [06:10] June explains how she found information on a topic with few records to verify its accuracy, except for references to Hebrea's work made by her successors. [07:15] Much of what June learned through research revealed surprises about Hebrea. Along with alchemy, she was an inventor. Her inventions are well-known, even if she isn't. [08:30] June explains why alchemy developed and why it was outlawed. Alchemy is still alive, but "barely breathing." Alchemy is the forerunner of modern chemistry. And alchemy is still pursued, as a "fringe" pursuit. [12:09] June talks about her books and the series. How Miriam bat Isaac uses alchemy, and the role it plays in the stories. [13:40] June describes the research she did for her novels and the kinds of details she familiarized herself with, as well as how long it took. She shares a bit about her research process. [17:15] June says she writes stories that depict her protagonist in extreme peril, involving a battle between Good and Evil, but one the protagonist may not always win. [18:42] June discusses her plans for the series. [20:25] June's working on a set of Miriam bat Isaac short stories. [22:05] June discusses women's education (and its availability) during the First Century CE and how it would affect her protagonist's ability to work. [24:36] Tacos versus pizza? June picks her favorite! [25:36] June's concluding remarks. She tries to write her books for a person "sitting in a hospital room," because she wants to transport people to fascinating worlds with her stories. She also shares her website, so check that out! ***** Do you enjoy scripted podcasts? That’s the question I ask in this poll. If you’d like to cast your vote on this highly-important issue matter, all you need to do is support the podcast on Patreon! Debbi Mack interviews crime writer June Trop on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer June Trop on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I also recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I have tried to note at what time various discussion topics come up in the recording.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [02:40] June talks about how she discovered Maria Hebrea, the woman who inspired her protagonist, Miriam bat Isaac, while researching a paper for a class on the history of chemistry.<br /> <br /> [04:43] June describes the nature of her protagonist, Miriam bat Isaac, a female alchemist, along with the illegal nature of her work.<br /> <br /> [06:10] June explains how she found information on a topic with few records to verify its accuracy, except for references to Hebrea's work made by her successors.<br /> <br /> [07:15] Much of what June learned through research revealed surprises about Hebrea. Along with alchemy, she was an inventor. Her inventions are well-known, even if she isn't.<br /> <br /> [08:30] June explains why alchemy developed and why it was outlawed. Alchemy is still alive, but "barely breathing." Alchemy is the forerunner of modern chemistry. And alchemy is still pursued, as a "fringe" pursuit.<br /> <br /> [12:09] June talks about her books and the series. How Miriam bat Isaac uses alchemy, and the role it plays in the stories.<br /> <br /> [13:40] June describes the research she did for her novels and the kinds of details she familiarized herself with, as well as how long it took. She shares a bit about her research process.<br /> <br /> [17:15] June says she writes stories that depict her protagonist in extreme peril, involving a battle between Good and Evil, but one the protagonist may not always win.<br /> <br /> [18:42] June discusses her plans for the series.<br /> <br /> [20:25] June's working on a set of Miriam bat Isaac short stories.<br /> <br /> [22:05] June discusses women's education (and its availability) during the First Century CE and how it would affect her protagonist's ability to work.<br /> <br /> [24:36] Tacos versus pizza? June picks her favorite!<br /> <br /> [25:36] June's concluding remarks. She tries to write her books for a person "sitting in a hospital room," because she wants to transport people to fascinating worlds with her stories. She also shares her website, so check that out!<br /> <br /> *****<br /> <br /> Do you enjoy scripted podcasts? That’s the question I ask in this poll.<br /> <br /> If you’d like to cast your vote on this highly-important issue matter, all you need to do is support the podcast on Patreon! Debbi Mack clean 28:40 Interview with Crime Writer Judith Yates — S. 5, Ep. 20 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-judith-yates-s-5-ep-20/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-judith-yates-s-5-ep-20 Sun, 01 Mar 2020 05:05:29 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19958 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Judith Yates on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I would also like to recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I have tried to note at what time various discussion topics come up in the recording. [02:35] Judith discusses her decision to study criminology. [03:40] Judith mentions her family's roots in law enforcement, including her grandfather's work for Pinkerton. [05:35] Discussion of Judith's book Bullied to Death. [08:57] The importance of good storytelling in true crime. [09:31] The use of technology and social media in bullying teens and children. [12:20] The emotional impact of the story in Bullied to Death. [12:50] The authors Judith find most inspiring. [14:25] Judith's opinion of the role of the true crime writer. [15:20] A few cautionary words about self-publishing other people's true stories. [18:40] Judith talks about her true crime book, She is Evil. [20:30] The focus in She is Evil on the misrepresentation of those of the Islamic faith. [24:00] Discussion of the post-9/11 backlash against Islamic people. [25:36] Judith's current work-in-progress, a true crime book about female bank robbers. [28:06] Bonnie Parker never robbed a bank! (Who knew? I didn't.) [29:10] I highly recommend Knives Out! (Review to come on another blog. Eventually.] And a bit of discussion about Bond. James Bond. [30:15] Judith mentions the list of resources available on online bullying. Her goal is to tell stories that readers can learn from, so as to avoid the mistakes of the past. ***** PS: Get exclusive pre-release episodes of the podcast and other perks. Support us on Patreon! You can also buy The Crime Cafe 9-Book Set on Kobo for $2.99 in the US and Canada until Sunday, March, 1, 2020! And at a reduced price at various other countries. (Just click the link!) Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Judith Yates on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I would also like to recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Judith Yates on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I would also like to recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I have tried to note at what time various discussion topics come up in the recording.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [02:35] Judith discusses her decision to study criminology.<br /> <br /> [03:40] Judith mentions her family's roots in law enforcement, including her grandfather's work for Pinkerton.<br /> <br /> [05:35] Discussion of Judith's book Bullied to Death.<br /> <br /> [08:57] The importance of good storytelling in true crime.<br /> <br /> [09:31] The use of technology and social media in bullying teens and children.<br /> <br /> [12:20] The emotional impact of the story in Bullied to Death.<br /> <br /> [12:50] The authors Judith find most inspiring.<br /> <br /> [14:25] Judith's opinion of the role of the true crime writer.<br /> <br /> [15:20] A few cautionary words about self-publishing other people's true stories.<br /> <br /> [18:40] Judith talks about her true crime book, She is Evil.<br /> <br /> [20:30] The focus in She is Evil on the misrepresentation of those of the Islamic faith.<br /> <br /> [24:00] Discussion of the post-9/11 backlash against Islamic people.<br /> <br /> [25:36] Judith's current work-in-progress, a true crime book about female bank robbers.<br /> <br /> [28:06] Bonnie Parker never robbed a bank! (Who knew? I didn't.)<br /> <br /> [29:10] I highly recommend Knives Out! (Review to come on another blog. Eventually.] And a bit of discussion about Bond. James Bond.<br /> <br /> [30:15] Judith mentions the list of resources available on online bullying. Her goal is to tell stories that readers can learn from, so as to avoid the mistakes of the past.<br /> <br /> *****<br /> <br /> PS: Get exclusive pre-release episodes of the podcast and other perks.<br /> <br /> Support us on Patreon!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> You can also buy The Crime Cafe 9-Book Set on Kobo for $2.99 in the US and Canada until Sunday, March, 1, 2020! And at a reduced price at various other countries. (Just click the link!) Debbi Mack clean 32:53 Interview with Crime Writer Michael Streed — S. 5, Ep. 19 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-michael-streed-s-5-ep-19/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-michael-streed-s-5-ep-19 Sun, 16 Feb 2020 05:05:43 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19906 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Michael Streed on the Crime Cafe podcast. For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. I would also like to recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have the ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I have tried to note at what time various discussion topics come up in the recording. [02:27] Michael talks about how he became a sketch artist for the police force. [02:45] Michael talks about his interest in drawing, starting with his childhood cartoons. [04:20] How Michael prepared to write his first book. [05:44] How writing police reports helped Michael write his first book, as well as the ways his law enforcement experience has helped him write true crime stories. [07:07] Michael talks about how police sketch artists work. [09:30] Michael explains what it means to be a certified forensic artist and why he chose to be certified. [09:40] Michael on the importance of having a good editor. [11:00] Our discussion the "modern age" of forensic artistry. [11:35] Why Michael created his own forensic software. [12:02] Michael talks about the true crime book he's working on. [15:05] Why Michael wrote his first book, SketchCop. [17:00] Michael discusses the process of creating forensic art through listening to stories. [17:40] One case Michael worked on involving the use of an unusual type of sketch. [18:45] Michael talks more about the process of police sketching. [20:00] Michael talks more about his love for cartooning. [21:00] The role of virtual technology in forensic art. [22:40] My off-the-wall question: Which do you prefer: autumn or spring? [24:10] Interview wrap-up. ***** Help bring back the show transcriptions! Please support the Crime Cafe on Patreon.     Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Michael Streed on the Crime Cafe podcast. - For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting. - I would also like to recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Michael Streed on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> For your podcasting needs, I use and recommend Blubrry Podcasting.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I would also like to recommend Stitcher Premium, if you’re a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’ve subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it’s nice to have the ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> Unfortunately, I can no longer provide transcription show notes, but will resume doing so when finances allow. I have tried to note at what time various discussion topics come up in the recording.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [02:27] Michael talks about how he became a sketch artist for the police force.<br /> <br /> [02:45] Michael talks about his interest in drawing, starting with his childhood cartoons.<br /> <br /> [04:20] How Michael prepared to write his first book.<br /> <br /> [05:44] How writing police reports helped Michael write his first book, as well as the ways his law enforcement experience has helped him write true crime stories.<br /> <br /> [07:07] Michael talks about how police sketch artists work.<br /> <br /> [09:30] Michael explains what it means to be a certified forensic artist and why he chose to be certified.<br /> <br /> [09:40] Michael on the importance of having a good editor.<br /> <br /> [11:00] Our discussion the "modern age" of forensic artistry.<br /> <br /> [11:35] Why Michael created his own forensic software.<br /> <br /> [12:02] Michael talks about the true crime book he's working on.<br /> <br /> [15:05] Why Michael wrote his first book, SketchCop.<br /> <br /> [17:00] Michael discusses the process of creating forensic art through listening to stories.<br /> <br /> [17:40] One case Michael worked on involving the use of an unusual type of sketch.<br /> <br /> [18:45] Michael talks more about the process of police sketching.<br /> <br /> [20:00] Michael talks more about his love for cartooning.<br /> <br /> [21:00] The role of virtual technology in forensic art.<br /> <br /> [22:40] My off-the-wall question: Which do you prefer: autumn or spring?<br /> <br /> [24:10] Interview wrap-up.<br /> <br /> *****<br /> <br /> Help bring back the show transcriptions! Please support the Crime Cafe on Patreon.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />   Debbi Mack clean 26:55 Interview with Crime Writer Bill Duncan — S. 5, Ep. 18 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-bill-duncan-s-5-ep-18/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-bill-duncan-s-5-ep-18 Sun, 02 Feb 2020 05:05:54 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19807 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Bill Duncan on the Crime Cafe podcast. Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. This post contains affiliate links. Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. I would also like to recommend Stitcher Premium, if you're a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I've subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it's nice to have the ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month. Debbi [00:01:44]: Hi, everyone. I'm pleased to have with me today an author who writes private eye novels—my favorite sub-genre. Today's guest is the author of the Rafferty Private Eye series, and his name is Bill Duncan. Hi, Bill. It's good to have you on today. Thanks for being here. Bill [00:02:06]: Hey, Debbi. It's great to be here. Debbi [00:02:07]: Awesome. It's great to have you. And first, I just think it's wonderful that you've brought your father's books back onto the market through self-publishing. He must have been very proud of you. Bill [00:02:20]: He was. It was a fantastic exercise to do and it was the sort of thing that finally gave him the ability to hear from the fans that he didn't get to hear from back during his trade pub days. So, as I think I alluded to a little bit in the guest blog post, back when he was publishing, the publishers asked for more books, sent royalty checks, that was about it. That was the sort of level of—and edits obviously, but that was the level of interaction that dad had with the funnel, I guess, where his books were going. So, he never really knew. And then to be able to hear, you know, 30 years later from people who had loved his books originally and then were loving them again now, was pretty special for him, yeah. And then for me too to be able to give that to him, yeah. Debbi [00:03:24]: That's just so fantastic. So, your father's fan base was out there waiting for these books to be re-released pretty much. That must have provided a lot of help with the sales. Bill [00:03:37]: Look, it did but there were some very influential people who had been fans of dad’s and they were great in sort of getting the word out. The funny thing that I found, though, is that the original books were only released in the US and Canada. And so, while there were a lot of fans that came back and said “it's great to see Rafferty back”, there were equally as many fans who never got a chance to meet the characters the first time around. So, they were reading Rafferty for the first time, and I had a number of emails from people saying, “I just wish I'd been able to get it the first time around”. So, people living in Europe and Canada and so on, who'd never met the character before. So, there was a fan base but then there was a new fan base that also picked up, which was great. Debbi [00:04:36]: That's fantastic. These books, what year were they first written? Bill [00:04:43]: Rafferty’s Rules, the first in the series, was written in ’85, I think from memory. I didn't study up on that question, Debbi. (chuckles) Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Bill Duncan on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. This post contains affiliate links. - Debbi:   Hi everyone. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Bill Duncan on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. This post contains affiliate links.<br /> <br /> Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I would also like to recommend Stitcher Premium, if you're a fan of podcasts. If you like true crime or crime fiction, there are loads of podcasts out there for you. And with Stitcher Premium you can listen to the exclusive archives from Criminology or bonus episodes from True Crime Garage. You can also listen ad-free to episodes of your favorite podcasts. I've subscribed, and for only $4.99 a month, it's nice to have the ad-free entertainment. Just go to www.stitcher.com/premium and use the promo code, CRIMECAFE, to try it out absolutely free for a month.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:44]: Hi, everyone. I'm pleased to have with me today an author who writes private eye novels—my favorite sub-genre. Today's guest is the author of the Rafferty Private Eye series, and his name is Bill Duncan. Hi, Bill. It's good to have you on today. Thanks for being here.<br /> <br /> Bill [00:02:06]: Hey, Debbi. It's great to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:02:07]: Awesome. It's great to have you. And first, I just think it's wonderful that you've brought your father's books back onto the market through self-publishing. He must have been very proud of you.<br /> <br /> Bill [00:02:20]: He was. It was a fantastic exercise to do and it was the sort of thing that finally gave him the ability to hear from the fans that he didn't get to hear from back during his trade pub days. So, as I think I alluded to a little bit in the guest blog post, back when he was publishing, the publishers asked for more books, sent royalty checks, that was about it. That was the sort of level of—and edits obviously, but that was the level of interaction that dad had with the funnel, I guess, where his books were going. So, he never really knew. And then to be able to hear, you know, 30 years later from people who had loved his books originally and then were loving them again now, was pretty special for him, yeah. And then for me too to be able to give that to him, yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:03:24]: That's just so fantastic. So, your father's fan base was out there waiting for these books to be re-released pretty much. That must have provided a lot of help with the sales.<br /> <br /> Bill [00:03:37]: Look, it did but there were some very influential people who had been fans of dad’s and they were great in sort of getting the word out. The funny thing that I found, though, is that the original books were only released in the US and Canada. And so, while there were a lot of fans that came back and said “it's great to see Rafferty back”, there were equally as many fans who never got a chance to meet the characters the first time around. So, they were reading Rafferty for the first time, and I had a number of emails from people saying, “I just wish I'd been able to get it the first time around”. So, people living in Europe and Canada and so on, who'd never met the character before. So, there was a fan base but then there was a new fan base that also picked up, which was great.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:04:36]: That's fantastic. These books, what year were they first written?<br /> <br /> Debbi Mack clean 27:52 Interview with Crime Writer Blaine Pardoe — S. 5, Ep. 17 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-blaine-pardoe-s-5-ep-17/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-blaine-pardoe-s-5-ep-17 Sun, 19 Jan 2020 05:05:57 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19727 Debbi Mack interviews true crime writer Blaine Pardoe on the Crime Cafe podcast. Sponsored by: Blubrry Podcasting – Launch your Podcast the Blubrry Way Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. This post contains affiliate links. Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:02] I’m happy to say that the podcast is sponsored this month by Blubrry Podcasting. If you either have a podcast or want to start one, I use them and I highly recommend them. Blubrry Podcasting makes my job much easier. For one thing, I have a WordPress website, and Blubrry only requires you use their PowerPress plugin to work. But you don’t have to be a WordPress user to launch a podcast with Blubrry Podcasting. So, there is flexibility. The best part is you don’t have to be a technical genius to use Blubrry Podcasting. But, if you run into trouble, Blubrry Podcasting has 5-day phone support and 7-day email support. I love that. So, get 30 days of Blubrry Podcasting Free. This includes hosting and stats and a WordPress site if you need one. Publishing is as simple as Create – Upload – Publish. Just use the Promo Code BLU011 to get started today. Debbi [00:02:13]: Hi everyone. Today's guest is an award-winning New York Times bestselling author of numerous books in a wide variety of genres, including true crime. He is also a historian, which I think is way cool. It's my great pleasure to introduce Blaine Pardoe. Hi, Blaine. Blaine [00:02:33]: Thanks for having me on. Debbi [00:02:35]: Sure thing. I'm glad you could be here. And let's see, you've had a really interesting career. I don’t get to talk to many crime authors who are also nonfiction historian writers. So, how did you get into that? Blaine [00:02:51]: Actually, you know, I tend to write the things I like to read. So, from my youth, I've been reading true crime and I've been reading military history, and when I became a writer, I was writing primarily science fiction and told my agent I wanted to get into writing some military history and he was like “that's crazy, you don't go that direction” and I said “well, I do”. And so, I started going into that and I wrote a number of military history books, really enjoyed doing that. And you know, then I decided, well, you know what, I always like true crime, I'll go branch into that. I found that, really, the amount of research—there’s a difference as to where you go to get the information, but the actual research methodologies are pretty similar between writing a historical nonfiction and writing true crime. "I wrote a number of military history books, really enjoyed doing that. And you know, then I decided, well, you know what, I always like true crime, I'll go branch into that. I found that, really, the amount of research—there’s a difference as to where you go to get the information, but the actual research methodologies are pretty similar between writing a historical nonfiction and writing true crime." Debbi [00:03:49]: Mm-hmm. I was gonna say, you said you have a preference for cold cases and older cases, is it more difficult to write about recent or ongoing cases? Blaine [00:04:03]: Yeah. You know, the problem is the wounds are all pretty new and you know, I'd love to do some current cases, especially some of them that are out there now are absolutely fascinating. The problem is, you know, Debbi Mack interviews true crime writer Blaine Pardoe on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Sponsored by: Blubrry Podcasting – Launch your Podcast the Blubrry Way - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, Debbi Mack interviews true crime writer Blaine Pardoe on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> Sponsored by: Blubrry Podcasting – Launch your Podcast the Blubrry Way<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. This post contains affiliate links.<br /> <br /> Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> [00:01:02] I’m happy to say that the podcast is sponsored this month by Blubrry Podcasting. If you either have a podcast or want to start one, I use them and I highly recommend them. Blubrry Podcasting makes my job much easier. For one thing, I have a WordPress website, and Blubrry only requires you use their PowerPress plugin to work. But you don’t have to be a WordPress user to launch a podcast with Blubrry Podcasting. So, there is flexibility. The best part is you don’t have to be a technical genius to use Blubrry Podcasting. But, if you run into trouble, Blubrry Podcasting has 5-day phone support and 7-day email support. I love that. So, get 30 days of Blubrry Podcasting Free. This includes hosting and stats and a WordPress site if you need one. Publishing is as simple as Create – Upload – Publish. Just use the Promo Code BLU011 to get started today.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi [00:02:13]: Hi everyone. Today's guest is an award-winning New York Times bestselling author of numerous books in a wide variety of genres, including true crime. He is also a historian, which I think is way cool. It's my great pleasure to introduce Blaine Pardoe. Hi, Blaine.<br /> <br /> Blaine [00:02:33]: Thanks for having me on.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:02:35]: Sure thing. I'm glad you could be here. And let's see, you've had a really interesting career. I don’t get to talk to many crime authors who are also nonfiction historian writers. So, how did you get into that?<br /> <br /> Blaine [00:02:51]: Actually, you know, I tend to write the things I like to read. So, from my youth, I've been reading true crime and I've been reading military history, and when I became a writer, I was writing primarily science fiction and told my agent I wanted to get into writing some military history and he was like “that's crazy, you don't go that direction” and I said “well, I do”. And so, I started going into that and I wrote a number of military history books, really enjoyed doing that. And you know, then I decided, well, you know what, I always like true crime, I'll go branch into that. I found that, really, the amount of research—there’s a difference as to where you go to get the information, but the actual research methodologies are pretty similar between writing a historical nonfiction and writing true crime.<br /> <br /> "I wrote a number of military history books, really enjoyed doing that. And you know, then I decided, well, you know what, I always like true crime, I'll go branch into that. I found that, really, the amount of research—there’s a difference as to where you go to get the information, but the actual research methodologies are pretty similar between writing a historical nonfiction and writing true crime."<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:03:49]: Mm-hmm. I was gonna say, you said you have a preference for cold cases and older cases, is it more difficult to write about recent or ongoing cases?<br /> <br /> Blaine [00:04:03]: Yeah. You know, the problem is the wounds are all pretty new and you know, Debbi Mack clean 27:23 Interview with Crime Writer Cathi Stoler — S. 5, Ep. 16 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/crime-cafe/interview-with-crime-writer-cathi-stoler-s-5-ep-16/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-cathi-stoler-s-5-ep-16 Sun, 05 Jan 2020 05:05:23 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19657 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Cathi Stoler on the Crime Cafe podcast. Sponsored by: Blubrry Podcasting – Launch your Podcast the Blubrry Way Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:02] I’m happy to say that the podcast is sponsored this month by Blubrry Podcasting. If you either have a podcast or want to start one, I use them and I highly recommend them. Blubrry Podcasting makes my job much easier. For one thing, I have a Wordpress website, and Blubrry only requires you use their PowerPress plugin to work. But you don’t have to be a Wordpress user to launch a podcast with Blubrry Podcasting. So, there is flexibility. The best part is you don’t have to be a technical genius to use Blubrry Podcasting. But, if you run into trouble, Blubrry Podcasting has 5-day phone support and 7-day email support. I love that. So, get 30 days of Blubrry Podcasting Free. This includes hosting and stats and a Wordpress site if you need one. Publishing is as simple as Create - Upload - Publish. Just use the Promo Code BLU011 to get started today. Debbi: Hi everyone. Happy new year. It's 2020, or it will be by the time this goes up on the air or in the stream or whatever. My guest today is author of the three-volume Laurel and Helen New York Mystery series and the three-time finalist and winner of the 2015 Derringer Award for Best Short Story. Her latest novel is called Out of Time: A Nick Donahue Adventure. It's not just a mystery, it's an adventure. So it's my pleasure to introduce my guest, Cathi Stoler. Hi Cathi, how are you doing today? Cathi: Hi Debbi. Thank you for having me. Debbi: I'm in the midst of reading Out of Time and enjoying the heck out of it. Can you tell us a bit about Nick Donahue, who I understand started as a character in a short story? Cathi: Yes. He is a professional blackjack player, and he travels all over the world. He lives in London with his partner, Marina DiPietro. And he's just, he's fun and he's sophisticated, and he seems to find himself in a lot of trouble, even though he's pretty smart. When I came up with him, he was gambling in the casino in Venice, and Marina was undercover for MI6, but he didn't know that. He met her and he helped her with something, and then he got in trouble, and she rescued him. And then at the end of that... So this is sort of a three-part story, and at the end of it he wound up rescuing her from the mob who thought he owed them $10 million. Debbi: Very interesting. Cathi: He got it back from them. They were doing money laundering. So and then I just thought I would... That was a novella. The short story morphed into a novella. And then I thought I would like to continue writing them, those two characters. Debbi: What was it exactly that attracted you about those two characters? Cathi: I just think that they're compatible but kind of opposite, and they're both pretty smart, and they both are good at their professions and their jobs. But there was just a little of this back-and-forth pull, and I thought that they would work well together to continue. Marina is really the detective, and he kind of, the private investigator, and he kind of helps her. " I just think that they're compatible but kind of opposite, and they're both pretty smart, and they both are good at their professions and their jobs. ... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Cathi Stoler on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Sponsored by: Blubrry Podcasting – Launch your Podcast the Blubrry Way - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Cathi Stoler on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> Sponsored by: Blubrry Podcasting – Launch your Podcast the Blubrry Way<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here.<br /> <br /> Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> [00:01:02] I’m happy to say that the podcast is sponsored this month by Blubrry Podcasting. If you either have a podcast or want to start one, I use them and I highly recommend them. Blubrry Podcasting makes my job much easier. For one thing, I have a Wordpress website, and Blubrry only requires you use their PowerPress plugin to work. But you don’t have to be a Wordpress user to launch a podcast with Blubrry Podcasting. So, there is flexibility. The best part is you don’t have to be a technical genius to use Blubrry Podcasting. But, if you run into trouble, Blubrry Podcasting has 5-day phone support and 7-day email support. I love that. So, get 30 days of Blubrry Podcasting Free. This includes hosting and stats and a Wordpress site if you need one. Publishing is as simple as Create - Upload - Publish. Just use the Promo Code BLU011 to get started today.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. Happy new year. It's 2020, or it will be by the time this goes up on the air or in the stream or whatever. My guest today is author of the three-volume Laurel and Helen New York Mystery series and the three-time finalist and winner of the 2015 Derringer Award for Best Short Story. Her latest novel is called Out of Time: A Nick Donahue Adventure. It's not just a mystery, it's an adventure. So it's my pleasure to introduce my guest, Cathi Stoler. Hi Cathi, how are you doing today?<br /> <br /> Cathi: Hi Debbi. Thank you for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I'm in the midst of reading Out of Time and enjoying the heck out of it. Can you tell us a bit about Nick Donahue, who I understand started as a character in a short story?<br /> <br /> Cathi: Yes. He is a professional blackjack player, and he travels all over the world. He lives in London with his partner, Marina DiPietro. And he's just, he's fun and he's sophisticated, and he seems to find himself in a lot of trouble, even though he's pretty smart. When I came up with him, he was gambling in the casino in Venice, and Marina was undercover for MI6, but he didn't know that. He met her and he helped her with something, and then he got in trouble, and she rescued him. And then at the end of that... So this is sort of a three-part story, and at the end of it he wound up rescuing her from the mob who thought he owed them $10 million.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Very interesting.<br /> <br /> Cathi: He got it back from them. They were doing money laundering. So and then I just thought I would... That was a novella. The short story morphed into a novella. And then I thought I would like to continue writing them, those two characters.<br /> <br /> Debbi: What was it exactly that attracted you about those two characters?<br /> <br /> Cathi: I just think that they're compatible but kind of opposite, and they're both pretty smart, and they both are good at their professions and their jobs. But there was just a little of this back-and-forth pull, and I thought that they would work well together to continue. Marina is really the detective, and he kind of, the private investigator, Debbi Mack clean 17:53 Interview with Crime Writer Jeff Lindsay — S. 5, Ep. 15 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-jeff-lindsay-s-5-ep-15/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-jeff-lindsay-s-5-ep-15 Sun, 22 Dec 2019 05:05:13 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19602 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Jeff Lindsay on the Crime Cafe podcast. Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: Hi, everyone. I'm thrilled to have with me today, the creator of my favorite serial killer, or at least one of them, Dexter Morgan, and he now has a new book out called Just Watch Me featuring his new protagonist Riley Wolfe. I just finished it and it's great, and my guest today is New York Times bestselling author, Jeff Lindsay. Jeff, it's wonderful to have you on. Jeff: Well, it's great to be had. Thank you very much. Debbi: Thank you very much. Tell us about Riley Wolfe and what prompted you to write this book. Jeff: Riley Wolfe is a master thief, maybe the best in the world. And the thing about him is for Riley, it's not about the money, it's about the challenge. He had a sort of traumatic childhood that made him grow up with two really overwhelming compulsions. And the first is to steal things that are impossible to steal. It just can't be done. And the second is, if possible, to steal them from the 1%. He has a real deep seated grudge, almost a hatred for the hereditary entitled people who just, in his mind, wallow in the money and sort of walk on everybody else with their ingrained privilege. So, it came because I wanted to do a new series and quite honestly I sort of needed to. And it was what we like to call a job of work there. I had to go through a lot of different changes, a lot of evolution. And I started with a conman and I realized that it'd be more interesting to make it someone that uses being a conman as a tool rather than an end. And so Riley Wolfe has those skills and he has an incredible skill for disguises and dialects and accents, but he uses those to get inside where you would think no one could go and steal things from the 1% that can't be taken. "Riley Wolfe is a master thief, maybe the best in the world. And the thing about him is for Riley, it's not about the money, it's about the challenge. " Debbi: Very interesting. I don't know if you did this consciously or unconsciously or if there's even a relationship, but there was part of what I saw in Riley was the Saint actually. Jeff: What's the what? Debbi: The Saint, if you're familiar with the character, the Saint. Jeff: No, I'm not. I'm sorry. Debbi: Oh, well that's, you should familiarize yourself with that character. Jeff: No, then people would say I was stealing. Debbi: Well, we don't want that. But it just reminds me of that, that mentality, that whole ability to transform themselves and then doing things just for whatever personal reason and having a deprived childhood also. Jeff: Well, so far I've also been compared to Les Mis and a couple of other things. So I guess I'm used to it. Debbi: Well, it's a very interesting psychological makeup on this character, and I have to say that he's capable of doing some really nasty things when he has to, which would make him awfully hard to like if you didn't know his backstory. So what did you do? I mean, what sort of research did you do to get into his backstory? Jeff: Well, I worked with a psychologist and I came up with a couple of basic things about him and ran them past her, and then she helped me refine it and bring it to a point. I don't know, every writer who is any good at all is at least part ... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Jeff Lindsay on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. - Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Jeff Lindsay on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here.<br /> <br /> Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, everyone. I'm thrilled to have with me today, the creator of my favorite serial killer, or at least one of them, Dexter Morgan, and he now has a new book out called Just Watch Me featuring his new protagonist Riley Wolfe. I just finished it and it's great, and my guest today is New York Times bestselling author, Jeff Lindsay. Jeff, it's wonderful to have you on.<br /> <br /> Jeff: Well, it's great to be had. Thank you very much.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Thank you very much. Tell us about Riley Wolfe and what prompted you to write this book.<br /> <br /> Jeff: Riley Wolfe is a master thief, maybe the best in the world. And the thing about him is for Riley, it's not about the money, it's about the challenge. He had a sort of traumatic childhood that made him grow up with two really overwhelming compulsions. And the first is to steal things that are impossible to steal. It just can't be done. And the second is, if possible, to steal them from the 1%. He has a real deep seated grudge, almost a hatred for the hereditary entitled people who just, in his mind, wallow in the money and sort of walk on everybody else with their ingrained privilege.<br /> <br /> So, it came because I wanted to do a new series and quite honestly I sort of needed to. And it was what we like to call a job of work there. I had to go through a lot of different changes, a lot of evolution. And I started with a conman and I realized that it'd be more interesting to make it someone that uses being a conman as a tool rather than an end. And so Riley Wolfe has those skills and he has an incredible skill for disguises and dialects and accents, but he uses those to get inside where you would think no one could go and steal things from the 1% that can't be taken.<br /> <br /> "Riley Wolfe is a master thief, maybe the best in the world. And the thing about him is for Riley, it's not about the money, it's about the challenge. "<br /> <br /> Debbi: Very interesting. I don't know if you did this consciously or unconsciously or if there's even a relationship, but there was part of what I saw in Riley was the Saint actually.<br /> <br /> Jeff: What's the what?<br /> <br /> Debbi: The Saint, if you're familiar with the character, the Saint.<br /> <br /> Jeff: No, I'm not. I'm sorry.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Oh, well that's, you should familiarize yourself with that character.<br /> <br /> Jeff: No, then people would say I was stealing.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Well, we don't want that. But it just reminds me of that, that mentality, that whole ability to transform themselves and then doing things just for whatever personal reason and having a deprived childhood also.<br /> <br /> Jeff: Well, so far I've also been compared to Les Mis and a couple of other things. So I guess I'm used to it.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Well, it's a very interesting psychological makeup on this character, and I have to say that he's capable of doing some really nasty things when he has to, which would make him awfully hard to like if you didn't know his backstory. So what did you do? I mean, what sort of research did you do to get into his backstory?<br /> <br /> Debbi Mack clean 20:35 Interview with Crime Writer V.S. Kemanis — S. 5, Ep. 14 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-v-s-kemanis/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-v-s-kemanis Sun, 08 Dec 2019 05:05:09 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19545 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer V.S. Kemanis on the Crime Cafe podcast. Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: Hi everyone. I'm so pleased to have with me today another lawyer who's written about what she knows. Her legal career is in criminal prosecution, but her creative pursuits include writing novels and short stories, as well as being a dancer and choreographer. Our guest today is V. S. Kemanis. VSK: Hi Debbi. Debbi: Hi. Hi Vija. VSK: How are you? Thanks so much for inviting me. Debbi: I am so glad you are here, and thank you for being here. I just finished your first novel and really enjoyed it. I assume it's safe to say that your protagonist, Dana Hargrove, was inspired or informed by your work as a district attorney? VSK: Yes, indeed she was. I wrote that novel, the first draft of it, shortly after I had finished the first 10 years of my legal career. The first five years were as an assistant district attorney in Manhattan, and the second five years of that was with the New York State Organized Crime Task Force. And I kind of included both of those experiences and put them together to develop my character and also to develop the case that she was investigating in that novel. I had just finished doing a big investigation and a case against the Colombian narcotics cartel operating in New York and mostly their money laundering activities, which were really fascinating and a lot of work. I worked on that for a good four years and so a lot of that went into the novel. Debbi: That's really something. In your first book, Dana is a neophyte dealing with all these ethical issues and divided loyalties. I was impressed with the way you wove all the different levels of conflict into the story. Do you plot that out all ahead of time or do you plot some and improvise some? VSK: I do some of both. Yes, I start out writing a novel with a general plan, a general plot idea, and I also write a very detailed outline before I actually launch into writing something, but invariably it ends up changing a little bit along the way as I write, and I realize that some things don't fit other things. I go back and review what I've written earlier on and have to change some things, but that's what really makes it exciting for me, I think. Because it really becomes its own work and the characters will lead you certain places. "I start out writing a novel with a general plan, a general plot idea, and I also write a very detailed outline before I actually launch into writing something, but invariably it ends up changing a little bit along the way as I write, ... but that's what really makes it exciting for me, I think. Because it really becomes its own work and the characters will lead you certain places." But certainly in terms of the broad outlines, I have usually in mind the cases that I'd like to highlight in the novel. Also ethical conflicts as you noted. I tend to really love those. Debbi: Those are great. VSK: Yeah, both the legal professional ethics as well as just personal moral dilemmas that people are faced with. All my novels have the interplay between the professional and the personal, which is an area that just really fascinates me, because it was a big challenge in my life as ... working very hard and trying to raise a family at the same time, so. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer V.S. Kemanis on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. - Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer V.S. Kemanis on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here.<br /> <br /> Debbi:   Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, debbimack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book, if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. I'm so pleased to have with me today another lawyer who's written about what she knows. Her legal career is in criminal prosecution, but her creative pursuits include writing novels and short stories, as well as being a dancer and choreographer. Our guest today is V. S. Kemanis.<br /> <br /> VSK: Hi Debbi.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi. Hi Vija.<br /> <br /> VSK: How are you? Thanks so much for inviting me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I am so glad you are here, and thank you for being here. I just finished your first novel and really enjoyed it. I assume it's safe to say that your protagonist, Dana Hargrove, was inspired or informed by your work as a district attorney?<br /> <br /> VSK: Yes, indeed she was. I wrote that novel, the first draft of it, shortly after I had finished the first 10 years of my legal career. The first five years were as an assistant district attorney in Manhattan, and the second five years of that was with the New York State Organized Crime Task Force. And I kind of included both of those experiences and put them together to develop my character and also to develop the case that she was investigating in that novel.<br /> <br /> I had just finished doing a big investigation and a case against the Colombian narcotics cartel operating in New York and mostly their money laundering activities, which were really fascinating and a lot of work. I worked on that for a good four years and so a lot of that went into the novel.<br /> <br /> Debbi: That's really something. In your first book, Dana is a neophyte dealing with all these ethical issues and divided loyalties. I was impressed with the way you wove all the different levels of conflict into the story. Do you plot that out all ahead of time or do you plot some and improvise some?<br /> <br /> VSK: I do some of both. Yes, I start out writing a novel with a general plan, a general plot idea, and I also write a very detailed outline before I actually launch into writing something, but invariably it ends up changing a little bit along the way as I write, and I realize that some things don't fit other things. I go back and review what I've written earlier on and have to change some things, but that's what really makes it exciting for me, I think. Because it really becomes its own work and the characters will lead you certain places.<br /> <br /> "I start out writing a novel with a general plan, a general plot idea, and I also write a very detailed outline before I actually launch into writing something, but invariably it ends up changing a little bit along the way as I write, ... but that's what really makes it exciting for me, I think. Because it really becomes its own work and the characters will lead you certain places."<br /> <br /> But certainly in terms of the broad outlines, I have usually in mind the cases that I'd like to highlight in the novel. Also ethical conflicts as you noted. I tend to really love those.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Those are great.<br /> <br /> VSK: Yeah, both the legal professional ethics as well as just personal moral dilemmas that people are faced with. Debbi Mack clean 27:56 Interview with Crime Writer Dennis N. Griffin — S. 5, Ep. 13 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-dennis-n-griffin-s-5-ep-13/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-dennis-n-griffin-s-5-ep-13 Sun, 24 Nov 2019 05:05:46 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19497 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Dennis N. Griffin on the Crime Cafe podcast. Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi [00:01:02]: Hi, everyone. Before I introduce my guest, I am going to give an extra thank you to my patrons, Ken MacClune and S. Koren. When this goes live, it'll be after “Thank You Patrons Day”, but this is an extra thank you to you guys. I should be thanking my patrons every day for supporting the podcast. If you're interested, just go to my website www.debbimack.com and click on ‘Crime Cafe’. Check out my Patreon page and the Crime Cafe ebooks while you're there. And now, I'm pleased to have with me today an author who writes crime fiction and true crime. A 20-year veteran of law enforcement, his latest book concerns the topic of cold cases. It's my pleasure to introduce Dennis Griffin. Hi, Dennis, how are you doing today? Dennis [00:01:59]: Oh, hi Debbi, a pleasure to join you. Debbi [00:02:02]: I'm so glad to have you here. I read your blog, your guest post, and that is just some powerful stuff you have in there about how unsolved murders end up being cold cases. Could you tell us a little bit about how you got involved in cold case investigation? "I met with the mother of the deceased soldier, and she explained to me that the case—this was in 2010, so it was a three-year-old case at that time—the mother explained that she had not gotten any answers through law enforcement and through the Army CID investigations of her son's death, and she wanted us, she wanted my employer to see if we could find out any answers for her as to what may have happened to her son." Dennis [00:02:22]: Yes. I was working as a private investigator for a firm in central New York and upstate New York. And my boss assigned me to investigate the 2007 death of a soldier from the 10th Mountain Division stationed at Fort Drum in Watertown, New York. So, I met with the mother of the deceased soldier, and she explained to me that the case—this was in 2010, so it was a three-year-old case at that time—the mother explained that she had not gotten any answers through law enforcement and through the Army CID investigations of her son's death, and she wanted us, she wanted my employer to see if we could find out any answers for her as to what may have happened to her son. So, that was how I initially got involved. And there was a case of where her son had recently returned from deployment to Afghanistan. He'd just assigned back on the base after a 30-day leave, and this again was in 2007, and he moved off base with another soldier to share an apartment. He was there one night, the next night after they get off duty, he went out bar hopping. He disappeared that night and was never seen again. A missing persons report was filed with the local Watertown City Police Department, and the Army considered him as an AWOL after, I think, it was 48 hours. Six months later, his skeletal remains were found in a field about three miles outside of Watertown. They were in such condition that no toxicology could be done and they couldn't establish a cause or manner of death, so everything was listed as ‘undetermined’. And that was the situation I became involved in trying to find out her son's activities that night; why he disappeared from the bar he was at and how he happened to end ... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Dennis N. Griffin on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Dennis N. Griffin on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:02]: Hi, everyone. Before I introduce my guest, I am going to give an extra thank you to my patrons, Ken MacClune and S. Koren. When this goes live, it'll be after “Thank You Patrons Day”, but this is an extra thank you to you guys. I should be thanking my patrons every day for supporting the podcast. If you're interested, just go to my website www.debbimack.com and click on ‘Crime Cafe’. Check out my Patreon page and the Crime Cafe ebooks while you're there. And now, I'm pleased to have with me today an author who writes crime fiction and true crime. A 20-year veteran of law enforcement, his latest book concerns the topic of cold cases. It's my pleasure to introduce Dennis Griffin. Hi, Dennis, how are you doing today?<br /> <br /> Dennis [00:01:59]: Oh, hi Debbi, a pleasure to join you.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:02:02]: I'm so glad to have you here. I read your blog, your guest post, and that is just some powerful stuff you have in there about how unsolved murders end up being cold cases. Could you tell us a little bit about how you got involved in cold case investigation?<br /> <br /> "I met with the mother of the deceased soldier, and she explained to me that the case—this was in 2010, so it was a three-year-old case at that time—the mother explained that she had not gotten any answers through law enforcement and through the Army CID investigations of her son's death, and she wanted us, she wanted my employer to see if we could find out any answers for her as to what may have happened to her son."<br /> <br /> Dennis [00:02:22]: Yes. I was working as a private investigator for a firm in central New York and upstate New York. And my boss assigned me to investigate the 2007 death of a soldier from the 10th Mountain Division stationed at Fort Drum in Watertown, New York. So, I met with the mother of the deceased soldier, and she explained to me that the case—this was in 2010, so it was a three-year-old case at that time—the mother explained that she had not gotten any answers through law enforcement and through the Army CID investigations of her son's death, and she wanted us, she wanted my employer to see if we could find out any answers for her as to what may have happened to her son.<br /> <br /> So, that was how I initially got involved. And there was a case of where her son had recently returned from deployment to Afghanistan. He'd just assigned back on the base after a 30-day leave, and this again was in 2007, and he moved off base with another soldier to share an apartment. He was there one night, the next night after they get off duty, he went out bar hopping. He disappeared that night and was never seen again. A missing persons report was filed with the local Watertown City Police Department, and the Army considered him as an AWOL after, I think, it was 48 hours.<br /> <br /> Six months later, his skeletal remains were found in a field about three miles outside of Watertown. They were in such condition that no toxicology could be done and they couldn't establish a cause or manner of death, so everything was listed as ‘undetermined’. Debbi Mack clean 25:22 Interview with Crime Writer Les Abend — S. 5, Ep. 12 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-les-abend-s-5-ep-12/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-les-abend-s-5-ep-12 Sun, 10 Nov 2019 05:05:00 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19422 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Les Abend on the Crime Cafe podcast. Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi [00:01:02]: Hi, everyone. Today, our guest is a writer with one of the coolest jobs anyone on the show has had. He's an airline pilot, and his proverbial second act is as a crime writer. Author of the novel, Paper Wings, it's my great pleasure to have with me today, Les Abend. Hi Les, how are you doing today? Les [00:01:27]: I'm doing great, Debbi. Thank you for having me on. Debbi [00:01:31]: Well, thank you for being here. I wanted to touch on, first, your previous experiences in writing for the trade publication Flying Magazine. You weren't entirely a newcomer then to the world of writing and publishing before your novel came out, correct? Les [00:01:51]: That's correct. Yeah, I've been writing for Flying Magazine now as a columnist for, I guess, 18 years. So, yeah, I was familiar with writing stories—the stories I write for Flying Magazine are a little bit different. They’re actual experiences and I just try to convey some insight to the general public, to the ‘flying’ public and more particularly, to general aviation pilots. Debbi [00:02:16]: Mm, that's very interesting. So, the audience for that magazine is general aviation pilots? Les [00:02:23]: For the most part, unless you include mom and dad. So, yeah. Debbi [00:02:28]: (chuckles). And do you write about your experiences as a pilot? Les [00:02:30]: I do, I do. And often times, you know, if it's not my experiences, it's other folks’ experiences or something that I'd like to highlight about the industry. But primarily, my experiences. Debbi [00:02:40]: That's really fantastic. It was a great training ground for you, I would think. Les [00:02:46]: It was and honestly—this is sort of a segue to where I get to the book—the objective was for me to get some notoriety so I could move forward with a novel, which has always been a goal of mine since I was young. And I sort of got sidetracked with Flying Magazine; you know, I’d send in some unsolicited articles and so on and so forth. And the editor-in-chief was looking for somebody at that very time, so it worked out very good and he wanted me to continue. He said, “most airline pilots can only write one article. I'll tell you what, if you can write another one, you might have a little bit of a future”. And well, the rest is history, so I'm very grateful. Debbi [00:03:34]: Well, it's really fantastic and it's a wonderful demonstration, kind of like a case study of how one person got into writing a book for publication. Because you've trained yourself through writing these stories for the magazine. Something for people to think about, I think. Les [00:03:56]: It's been very helpful and it's been a great experience. And actually, the most gratifying thing to me, as probably you as a writer and screenplay writer, is that somebody enjoys it or somebody is motivated to move forward. With my career, some of the best moments I've had is somebody taking me aside and saying, “because of you and the columns that you presented, I moved ahead with my career as an airline pilot”, so that's very gratifying to me. "And actually, the most gratifying thing to me, as probably you as a writer and screenplay writer, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Les Abend on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Les Abend on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:02]: Hi, everyone. Today, our guest is a writer with one of the coolest jobs anyone on the show has had. He's an airline pilot, and his proverbial second act is as a crime writer. Author of the novel, Paper Wings, it's my great pleasure to have with me today, Les Abend. Hi Les, how are you doing today?<br /> <br /> Les [00:01:27]: I'm doing great, Debbi. Thank you for having me on.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:31]: Well, thank you for being here. I wanted to touch on, first, your previous experiences in writing for the trade publication Flying Magazine. You weren't entirely a newcomer then to the world of writing and publishing before your novel came out, correct?<br /> <br /> Les [00:01:51]: That's correct. Yeah, I've been writing for Flying Magazine now as a columnist for, I guess, 18 years. So, yeah, I was familiar with writing stories—the stories I write for Flying Magazine are a little bit different. They’re actual experiences and I just try to convey some insight to the general public, to the ‘flying’ public and more particularly, to general aviation pilots.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:02:16]: Mm, that's very interesting. So, the audience for that magazine is general aviation pilots?<br /> <br /> Les [00:02:23]: For the most part, unless you include mom and dad. So, yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:02:28]: (chuckles). And do you write about your experiences as a pilot?<br /> <br /> Les [00:02:30]: I do, I do. And often times, you know, if it's not my experiences, it's other folks’ experiences or something that I'd like to highlight about the industry. But primarily, my experiences.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:02:40]: That's really fantastic. It was a great training ground for you, I would think.<br /> <br /> Les [00:02:46]: It was and honestly—this is sort of a segue to where I get to the book—the objective was for me to get some notoriety so I could move forward with a novel, which has always been a goal of mine since I was young. And I sort of got sidetracked with Flying Magazine; you know, I’d send in some unsolicited articles and so on and so forth. And the editor-in-chief was looking for somebody at that very time, so it worked out very good and he wanted me to continue. He said, “most airline pilots can only write one article. I'll tell you what, if you can write another one, you might have a little bit of a future”. And well, the rest is history, so I'm very grateful.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:03:34]: Well, it's really fantastic and it's a wonderful demonstration, kind of like a case study of how one person got into writing a book for publication. Because you've trained yourself through writing these stories for the magazine. Something for people to think about, I think.<br /> <br /> Les [00:03:56]: It's been very helpful and it's been a great experience. And actually, the most gratifying thing to me, as probably you as a writer and screenplay writer, is that somebody enjoys it or somebody is motivated to move forward. With my career, some of the best moments I've had is somebody taking me aside and saying, “because of you and the columns that you presented, Debbi Mack clean 23:28 Interview with Crime Writer Richard T. Cahill — S. 5, Ep. 11 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-richard-t-cahill-s-5-ep-11/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-richard-t-cahill-s-5-ep-11 Sun, 27 Oct 2019 04:05:37 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19305 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer and non-fiction author Richard T. Cahill on the Crime Cafe podcast. Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: [00:01:02] Hi, I'm pleased to have with me today another lawyer-turned-writer, which in my book is always a great thing. A member of the New York State Bar, he's worked as both an assistant district attorney and a criminal defense attorney. Not at the same time, of course. And he also practiced civil law---practices, I should say, civil law. He currently represents injured workers and volunteer firefighters, which is way cool in my book. He has written and published two true crime books. His latest work is a crime fiction thriller. It's my great pleasure to have here today Richard T. Cahill. Thank you so much for being here today, Richard. Richard: [00:01:51] Well, thank you for having me. Debbi: [00:01:54] It's a pleasure to have you on. Your first book was Hauptmann's Ladder, is that the correct pronunciation? Richard: [00:01:59] It is. Debbi: [00:02:02] Which was a detailed account of the Lindbergh kidnapping. At the very beginning of the book, you talk about what drew you into writing this book. Maybe you can do that. Tell us a little about that, as a teaser for the book, for readers. Richard: [00:02:18] Sure. Well, when I was 18 years old, I was in my freshman English class and the professor, Dr. Cotter, said that he wanted us to write a research paper. And so I thought, well, no problem. I'd read some books about, you know, the Lincoln assassination and I could do something about that. But then, being a wise professor, he then announced that it had to be something that you've never read anything about or ever done any research on. So part of me, I have to be honest, said, well, maybe I'll just do it anyway. But then I thought, now I've got to follow the rules. So I went to the library and I started looking around to see what I could find. And I found this small book and it had a whole series of stories in it, stuff like did Jesse James die the way history records? You know, did Neil Armstrong really walk on the moon? You know, stuff like that. And one of them was, did Bruno Richard Hauptmann kidnap and kill the Lindbergh baby? And as I read that particular article, I then remembered many years ago seeing an old TV show called In Search of ... with Leonard Nimoy. And all I remember was they did a show on it. And the only thing I could remember, there was a guy with a mustache who said that it was a miscarriage of justice. That's really all I remembered. So I thought this might be interesting. So I read one book. Ironically, I later found out it was written by the guy with the mustache. I didn't find it out for many years later that that's who it was. And I read two magazine articles. [00:03:45] And I wrote what I thought was a wonderful paper proclaiming that Hauptmann was framed, didn't do it, and so forth. And it came back, and I believe I got a B or a B-plus as memory serves me. And, geez, I should have gotten an A. Well, now, looking back, seeing the paper, my lousy research and so forth, I should have gotten an F. So the professor was very kind in what he gave me. But from there I read, I saw another book not long after that on the case and I read it. And that was one by Sir Ludovic Kennedy, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer and non-fiction author Richard T. Cahill on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer and non-fiction author Richard T. Cahill on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:02] Hi, I'm pleased to have with me today another lawyer-turned-writer, which in my book is always a great thing. A member of the New York State Bar, he's worked as both an assistant district attorney and a criminal defense attorney. Not at the same time, of course. And he also practiced civil law---practices, I should say, civil law. He currently represents injured workers and volunteer firefighters, which is way cool in my book. He has written and published two true crime books. His latest work is a crime fiction thriller. It's my great pleasure to have here today Richard T. Cahill. Thank you so much for being here today, Richard.<br /> <br /> Richard: [00:01:51] Well, thank you for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:54] It's a pleasure to have you on. Your first book was Hauptmann's Ladder, is that the correct pronunciation?<br /> <br /> Richard: [00:01:59] It is.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:02] Which was a detailed account of the Lindbergh kidnapping. At the very beginning of the book, you talk about what drew you into writing this book. Maybe you can do that. Tell us a little about that, as a teaser for the book, for readers.<br /> <br /> Richard: [00:02:18] Sure. Well, when I was 18 years old, I was in my freshman English class and the professor, Dr. Cotter, said that he wanted us to write a research paper. And so I thought, well, no problem. I'd read some books about, you know, the Lincoln assassination and I could do something about that. But then, being a wise professor, he then announced that it had to be something that you've never read anything about or ever done any research on. So part of me, I have to be honest, said, well, maybe I'll just do it anyway. But then I thought, now I've got to follow the rules. So I went to the library and I started looking around to see what I could find. And I found this small book and it had a whole series of stories in it, stuff like did Jesse James die the way history records? You know, did Neil Armstrong really walk on the moon? You know, stuff like that. And one of them was, did Bruno Richard Hauptmann kidnap and kill the Lindbergh baby? And as I read that particular article, I then remembered many years ago seeing an old TV show called In Search of ... with Leonard Nimoy. And all I remember was they did a show on it. And the only thing I could remember, there was a guy with a mustache who said that it was a miscarriage of justice. That's really all I remembered. So I thought this might be interesting. So I read one book. Ironically, I later found out it was written by the guy with the mustache. I didn't find it out for many years later that that's who it was. And I read two magazine articles.<br /> <br /> [00:03:45] And I wrote what I thought was a wonderful paper proclaiming that Hauptmann was framed, didn't do it, and so forth. And it came back, and I believe I got a B or a B-plus as memory serves me. And, geez, I should have gotten an A. Well, now, looking back, seeing the paper, my lousy research and so forth, I should have gotten an F. So the professor was very kind in what he gave me. Debbi Mack clean 23:44 Interview with Crime Writer Peter Eichstaedt — S. 5, Ep. 10 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-peter-eichstaedt-s-5-ep-10/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-peter-eichstaedt-s-5-ep-10 Sun, 13 Oct 2019 04:05:10 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19147 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer and non-fiction author Peter Eichstaedt on the Crime Cafe podcast. Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: [00:01:01] Hi, everyone. My guest this week has extensive experience as a journalist. He's also written two award-winning non-fiction books. In addition, he's the author of the Kyle Dawson series, one of which he's giving away to a lucky reader. I'm pleased to have with me today author Peter Eichstaedt. Hi, Peter. How are you doing today? Peter: [00:01:26] Good. How are you? Debbi: [00:01:28] Fine, thanks. Thanks for being with us. Peter: [00:01:32] My pleasure. Debbi: [00:01:34] Okay. Well, first, I have to say that I absolutely loved your guest post. And those of you who are listening, if you haven't read his guest post, just go to my blog for the Wednesday before this podcast when up on video and take a look. It's well-done. Would you describe your fiction as being---what sort of genre? Political thriller? Peter: [00:02:00] That's a good question. Yeah, I like the thriller designation, but I also like mysteries and I would think I've tried to blend the two. I don't know how successful I've been at that. But I don't really feel like I write genre fiction, but I guess I do if you need to put it into a category, it would be, you know, like mystery, mystery-thriller. But I think a lot of people, a lot of writers kind of blend genres, so, I guess that's probably a good description of it. Usually what I've done is, you know, I feel compelled to have a story, to tell a story. And so the way I look at it is, I use the devices I need to use to tell that story. And I'm less ... I'm really more focused on that than anything else, than trying to fit into a genre. I know a lot of times, you know, when you're sending a book out and trying to find an agent or something like that, they just want to know what category. And they have all these admonitions on their website, you know, we don't represent this, we don't represent that, but we do represent this and that. So I don't know. Sometimes it's hard to make things fit. Debbi: [00:03:43] I'm just thinking from a reader's perspective, say, who would you compare yourself to? Peter: [00:03:49] Well, I like, I've always liked ... I'm not going to compare myself to anybody in particular. But I like the Raymond Chandler mysteries. I really like those a lot. And that's kind of been my inspiration. And, on the other hand, too, though, I like, you know, my favorite literary writer is Hemingway, although I've written it, I mean, I've read and I've followed a lot of other more traditional literary works. But I like, the reason I like Hemingway is because ... the exotic locations and there's lots of action and there's lots of tension. And I don't mean action like shoot 'em up, you know, cowboys kind of thing. But there's, I don't know, activity, action in the story. So that's what I kind of shoot for. That's my goal. "I like the Raymond Chandler mysteries. I really like those a lot. And that's kind of been my inspiration. And, on the other hand, too, though, I like, you know, my favorite literary writer is Hemingway ... the reason I like Hemingway is because ... the exotic locations and there's lots of action and there's lots of tension." Debbi Mack interviews crime writer and non-fiction author Peter Eichstaedt on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer and non-fiction author Peter Eichstaedt on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:01] Hi, everyone. My guest this week has extensive experience as a journalist. He's also written two award-winning non-fiction books. In addition, he's the author of the Kyle Dawson series, one of which he's giving away to a lucky reader. I'm pleased to have with me today author Peter Eichstaedt. Hi, Peter. How are you doing today?<br /> <br /> Peter: [00:01:26] Good. How are you?<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:28] Fine, thanks. Thanks for being with us.<br /> <br /> Peter: [00:01:32] My pleasure.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:34] Okay. Well, first, I have to say that I absolutely loved your guest post. And those of you who are listening, if you haven't read his guest post, just go to my blog for the Wednesday before this podcast when up on video and take a look. It's well-done. Would you describe your fiction as being---what sort of genre? Political thriller?<br /> <br /> Peter: [00:02:00] That's a good question. Yeah, I like the thriller designation, but I also like mysteries and I would think I've tried to blend the two. I don't know how successful I've been at that. But I don't really feel like I write genre fiction, but I guess I do if you need to put it into a category, it would be, you know, like mystery, mystery-thriller. But I think a lot of people, a lot of writers kind of blend genres, so, I guess that's probably a good description of it. Usually what I've done is, you know, I feel compelled to have a story, to tell a story. And so the way I look at it is, I use the devices I need to use to tell that story. And I'm less ... I'm really more focused on that than anything else, than trying to fit into a genre. I know a lot of times, you know, when you're sending a book out and trying to find an agent or something like that, they just want to know what category. And they have all these admonitions on their website, you know, we don't represent this, we don't represent that, but we do represent this and that. So I don't know. Sometimes it's hard to make things fit.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:43] I'm just thinking from a reader's perspective, say, who would you compare yourself to?<br /> <br /> Peter: [00:03:49] Well, I like, I've always liked ... I'm not going to compare myself to anybody in particular. But I like the Raymond Chandler mysteries. I really like those a lot. And that's kind of been my inspiration. And, on the other hand, too, though, I like, you know, my favorite literary writer is Hemingway, although I've written it, I mean, I've read and I've followed a lot of other more traditional literary works. But I like, the reason I like Hemingway is because ... the exotic locations and there's lots of action and there's lots of tension. And I don't mean action like shoot 'em up, you know, cowboys kind of thing. But there's, I don't know, activity, action in the story. So that's what I kind of shoot for. That's my goal.<br /> <br /> "I like the Raymond Chandler mysteries. I really like those a lot. And that's kind of been my inspiration. And, on the other hand, too, though, I like, you know, my favorite literary writer is Hemingway ... Debbi Mack clean 29:17 Interview with Mystery Writer Daniella Bernett – S. 5, Ep. 9 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-mystery-writer-daniella-bernett-s-5-ep-9/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-mystery-writer-daniella-bernett-s-5-ep-9 Sun, 06 Oct 2019 04:05:30 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19109 Debbi Mack interviews mystery writer Daniella Burnett on the Crime Cafe podcast. Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. eDebbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: [00:01:02] Hi, everyone. Before we get started, I'd like to express my thanks to S Koran for becoming our latest Patreon supporter. Every little bit helps, you guys. So thank you so much. Having said that, our guest is making a return visit today. A poet as well as a mystery writer, she's the author of The Emmeline Kirby/Gregory Longdon mystery series. And her name is Daniella Burnett. [00:01:31] Hi, Daniella. It's good to see you again. Daniella: [00:01:34] Hi. It's nice to be back. Debbi: [00:01:36] Awesome. So tell us a little bit about your latest book in the series. Daniella: [00:01:42] Well, my latest book is called When Blood Runs Cold. And my series is the Emmeline Kirby/Gregory Longdon series. It's about a journalist and a jewel thief. And, in this book, we deal with a diamond, spies, and poisonous lies. Debbi: [00:02:04] Well, that's interesting. Daniella: [00:02:07] A lot of elements there. Debbi: [00:02:09] It seems to me that each book brings Emmeline and Gregory a bit closer together. At the same time, all these secrets from the past crawl out of the woodwork and seem to conspire to keep them apart or at the very least, threaten them. Do you come up with these complications as you write each book? Or were they planned from Book One? Daniella: [00:02:33] They were actually planned from Book One because it is a series. I leave a little something in one book and develop it a little bit more. Give you a little hint for the next book. So it was planned from the beginning. And in this in this particular book, Emmeline and Gregory are engaged. But as you noted, there is a lie. Like everything Emmeline thought about her life, all of a sudden she discovers it's been a lie. And that does have an impact on the dynamic of their relationship and to the rest of the story. And a number of the characters that they do meet. And it also has another element, something from Gregory's past. This ruthless entrepreneur named Alastair Swanbeck has come back for revenge against Gregory for things that should have been left alone. "I leave a little something in one book and develop it a little bit more. Give you a little hint for the next book. So it was planned from the beginning. And in this in this particular book, Emmeline and Gregory are engaged. But as you noted, there is a lie." Debbi: [00:03:29] Uh-huh. Yes. Yes, I noticed Swanbeck is introduced right there at the beginning, along with the fact that Emmeline's parents were murdered. Daniella: [00:03:44] Yes. She discovered that at the end of the previous book, A Checkered Past, because her parents were journalists like she was, and she had been told that they had been killed while on assignment when she was five years old. So that's what she had believed up until this point. But at the end of A Checkered Past, we discover that her parents were really murdered. So that's the way When Blood Runs Cold starts out. She's determined to follow their killer, even though it has been 25 years since her parents died. Debbi: [00:04:22] So that's a very cold case. So I take it you're one of those writers who likes to create big biographies for your characters before you get started... Debbi Mack interviews mystery writer Daniella Burnett on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. - eDebbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews mystery writer Daniella Burnett on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along with the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here.<br /> <br /> eDebbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:02] Hi, everyone. Before we get started, I'd like to express my thanks to S Koran for becoming our latest Patreon supporter. Every little bit helps, you guys. So thank you so much. Having said that, our guest is making a return visit today. A poet as well as a mystery writer, she's the author of The Emmeline Kirby/Gregory Longdon mystery series. And her name is Daniella Burnett.<br /> <br /> [00:01:31] Hi, Daniella. It's good to see you again.<br /> <br /> Daniella: [00:01:34] Hi. It's nice to be back.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:36] Awesome. So tell us a little bit about your latest book in the series.<br /> <br /> Daniella: [00:01:42] Well, my latest book is called When Blood Runs Cold. And my series is the Emmeline Kirby/Gregory Longdon series. It's about a journalist and a jewel thief. And, in this book, we deal with a diamond, spies, and poisonous lies.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:04] Well, that's interesting.<br /> <br /> Daniella: [00:02:07] A lot of elements there.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:09] It seems to me that each book brings Emmeline and Gregory a bit closer together. At the same time, all these secrets from the past crawl out of the woodwork and seem to conspire to keep them apart or at the very least, threaten them. Do you come up with these complications as you write each book? Or were they planned from Book One?<br /> <br /> Daniella: [00:02:33] They were actually planned from Book One because it is a series. I leave a little something in one book and develop it a little bit more. Give you a little hint for the next book. So it was planned from the beginning. And in this in this particular book, Emmeline and Gregory are engaged. But as you noted, there is a lie. Like everything Emmeline thought about her life, all of a sudden she discovers it's been a lie. And that does have an impact on the dynamic of their relationship and to the rest of the story. And a number of the characters that they do meet. And it also has another element, something from Gregory's past. This ruthless entrepreneur named Alastair Swanbeck has come back for revenge against Gregory for things that should have been left alone.<br /> <br /> "I leave a little something in one book and develop it a little bit more. Give you a little hint for the next book. So it was planned from the beginning. And in this in this particular book, Emmeline and Gregory are engaged. But as you noted, there is a lie."<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:29] Uh-huh. Yes. Yes, I noticed Swanbeck is introduced right there at the beginning, along with the fact that Emmeline's parents were murdered.<br /> <br /> Daniella: [00:03:44] Yes. She discovered that at the end of the previous book, A Checkered Past, because her parents were journalists like she was, and she had been told that they had been killed while on assignment when she was five years old. So that's what she had believed up until this point. But at the end of A Checkered Past, we discover that her parents were really murdered. So that's the way When Blood Runs Cold starts out. She's determined to follow their killer, Debbi Mack clean 18:22 Interview with Crime Writer Andy Caldwell – S. 5., Ep. 8 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-crime-writer-andy-caldwell/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-crime-writer-andy-caldwell Sun, 29 Sep 2019 04:05:37 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=19051 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andy Caldwell on the Crime Cafe podcast. Read along to the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: [00:01:04] Hi, everyone. Our guest today worked as a police officer and detective with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, up until his retirement. He's investigated a number of high-profile cases, including the armed robbery and kidnapping case brought against O.J. Simpson. His book, Room 1203, is the true crime story of that O.J. case. The one from Nevada. That book has also provided the basis for a documentary, O.J.: Guilty in Vegas. It's with great pleasure that I bring you Andy Caldwell. Hey, Andy, thanks for being here. Andy: [00:01:45] Thank you so much, Debbi. Thank you for that kind introduction and I thank you for your time today. Debbi: [00:01:50] Well, I appreciate your being here very much. Before we talk about your book, I have to say I was heartened by your philosophy of criminal justice. I like the emphasis on seeking solutions rather than vengeance. Has that been a.. has that been a difficult position to take in any way? Andy: [00:02:13] Yeah, sometimes, you know, because sometimes even in the law enforcement community, people get frustrated with suspects who are committing crimes and you just want them to pay right now. And sometimes taking, I guess, a more whole approach or whole community approach, isn't always the most palatable to other people. Debbi: [00:02:37] Mm-hmm. Yeah. Yeah, I can see where it would be tough. But I like the way you approach it. And, in some ways, it reminds me of Buddhism. Andy: [00:02:51] Well, I guess one of the things that I always embraced was the fact that when people commit crimes, they've gotta be held accountable for it. But it doesn't mean we have to hate them. And sometimes there's this desire to instantly be angry with the individual. And sometimes all it does is create barriers to actually holding them accountable and then trying to help them back on their feet. And if we can't help them back on their feet, then we just create a perpetual problem in society. So at some point in time, we've got to try to help some people. "I guess one of the things that I always embraced was the fact that when people commit crimes, they've gotta be held accountable for it. But it doesn't mean we have to hate them." Debbi: [00:03:26] I couldn't agree with you more. I think that's great. How long were you with the Vegas police and how much of that time was as a detective? Andy: [00:03:35] So just under 20 years, and I spent about nine years as a detective? You would think I would know that right off the top of my head. But yeah, it was about nine years as a detective. Debbi: [00:03:50] Well, sometimes you just gotta do the math. I know the feeling. How did you end up assigned to investigate O.J. Simpson? Andy: [00:04:00] Well, so I was assigned to the robbery-homicide bureau. I specifically worked robberies. And I would love to tell you that it was because I'm a crack investigator. And they said, hey, it's O.J. Simpson, we need their best guy on the job. But the reality was the crime occurred in the area of town I was primarily responsible for. It was the type of crime I was responsible for. So when it came out, it just automatically was grounded to me. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andy Caldwell on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Read along to the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andy Caldwell on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Read along to the podcast or, if you’re in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com, under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:04] Hi, everyone. Our guest today worked as a police officer and detective with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, up until his retirement. He's investigated a number of high-profile cases, including the armed robbery and kidnapping case brought against O.J. Simpson. His book, Room 1203, is the true crime story of that O.J. case. The one from Nevada. That book has also provided the basis for a documentary, O.J.: Guilty in Vegas. It's with great pleasure that I bring you Andy Caldwell. Hey, Andy, thanks for being here.<br /> <br /> Andy: [00:01:45] Thank you so much, Debbi. Thank you for that kind introduction and I thank you for your time today.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:50] Well, I appreciate your being here very much. Before we talk about your book, I have to say I was heartened by your philosophy of criminal justice. I like the emphasis on seeking solutions rather than vengeance. Has that been a.. has that been a difficult position to take in any way?<br /> <br /> Andy: [00:02:13] Yeah, sometimes, you know, because sometimes even in the law enforcement community, people get frustrated with suspects who are committing crimes and you just want them to pay right now. And sometimes taking, I guess, a more whole approach or whole community approach, isn't always the most palatable to other people.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:37] Mm-hmm. Yeah. Yeah, I can see where it would be tough. But I like the way you approach it. And, in some ways, it reminds me of Buddhism.<br /> <br /> Andy: [00:02:51] Well, I guess one of the things that I always embraced was the fact that when people commit crimes, they've gotta be held accountable for it. But it doesn't mean we have to hate them. And sometimes there's this desire to instantly be angry with the individual. And sometimes all it does is create barriers to actually holding them accountable and then trying to help them back on their feet. And if we can't help them back on their feet, then we just create a perpetual problem in society. So at some point in time, we've got to try to help some people.<br /> <br /> "I guess one of the things that I always embraced was the fact that when people commit crimes, they've gotta be held accountable for it. But it doesn't mean we have to hate them."<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:26] I couldn't agree with you more. I think that's great. How long were you with the Vegas police and how much of that time was as a detective?<br /> <br /> Andy: [00:03:35] So just under 20 years, and I spent about nine years as a detective? You would think I would know that right off the top of my head. But yeah, it was about nine years as a detective.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:50] Well, sometimes you just gotta do the math. I know the feeling. How did you end up assigned to investigate O.J. Simpson?<br /> <br /> Andy: [00:04:00] Well, so I was assigned to the robbery-homicide bureau. I specifically worked robberies. And I would love to tell you that it was because I'm a crack investigator. And they said, hey, it's O.J. Simpson, we need their best guy on the job. But the reality was the crime occurred in the area ... Debbi Mack clean 22:47 Interview with Crime Writer Burl Barer – S. 5, Ep. 7 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-crime-writer-burl-barer-s-5-ep-7/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-crime-writer-burl-barer-s-5-ep-7 Sun, 15 Sep 2019 04:05:21 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18984 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Burl Barer on the Crime Cafe podcast.       Read along to the podcast or, if you're in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. And between you, me, and the rest of Internet, Burl is hilarious! Give it a listen folks. And, like I said, feel free to read along! Debbi: [00:00:12] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: [00:01:02] Hi everyone. Before I get started, I'd like to give a hale and hearty shout-out to my first Patreon contributor Ken MacClune, not to mention his awesome wife, Karen, and their amazing daughter, Ella. Okay, I suppose I should, in the interest of full disclosure, say that Ken is my brother. But having given support to my Patreon page, to this podcast, he has gotten his free copy of---well, not free, but for the support, he has gotten with that a copy of my fourth Sam McRae novel, which is coming out this month, Deep Six. And by taking advantage of a limited time special offer, he was able to get this. So more of those are coming. So keep your eye on that Patreon page. I'll try to keep you updated as fast as I can. And, on that note, I'd like to introduce a very special guest. Not only is this author an investigative journalist and true crime author, he is also an Edgar award-winning author of the Saint novels, which is really cool in my book. How many of you remember the episodes with Roger Moore? I know I do. It's my pleasure to have with me today Burl Barer. Hi Burl. How are you? Burl: [00:02:26] Better and better every day, in every way. Debbi: [00:02:28] That's great. Burl: [00:02:30] There was a French psychologist named Emile Coue. And he believed that if you stood in front of the mirror and told yourself that like 20 times, that sooner or later you'd believe it. I've been trying it now for about 30, 40 years. I'm not convinced, but I'm giving it a shot. Debbi: [00:02:49] Yeah, it's very interesting because I've heard about that. It's kind of like ... Hmmm? Really? Burl: [00:02:54] Positive reinforcement. Debbi: [00:02:58] I think there's something to that. I think there's a lot to this whole idea of visualization and so forth. Burl: [00:03:04] I know. I've visualized a lot of really interesting things in my life that I'd probably be arrested for. But in the world of visualization, all things are okay. Debbi: [00:03:14] There you go. I was looking over your bio and bibliography and I was deeply impressed by the range of your work. Did you start your career as a journalist, in journalism as a writer? Burl: [00:03:31] Yeah, well, it's hard to say what we want to admit. I started my career as a small child. My mother was a newspaperwoman and my father smelled of elderberries. We have journalism and that sort of thing in the family history, family background. My mother was a newspaper woman. Her brother Sid Copeland wrote for Life Magazine, Time magazine. He was later Vice President of Cold & Weber public relations. My sister was a gossip columnist, I mean, uh, society editor. That's what you want to call it. And she wrote books and my cousin Helen writes books. My cousin Shoshana Barer writes books. I mean, it's kind of, you know, if you grow up in a family of opera singers, being an opera singer is perfectly normal. You grow up in a family of writers, being a writer is perfectly normal. I can't fix a car. If you want me to do that, I'm terribly sorry. I don't know how. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Burl Barer on the Crime Cafe podcast. -   -   -   - Read along to the podcast or, if you're in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. And between you, me, and the rest of Internet, Burl is hilarious! Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Burl Barer on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Read along to the podcast or, if you're in a rush, download a copy of the show notes here. And between you, me, and the rest of Internet, Burl is hilarious! Give it a listen folks. And, like I said, feel free to read along!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:12] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:02] Hi everyone. Before I get started, I'd like to give a hale and hearty shout-out to my first Patreon contributor Ken MacClune, not to mention his awesome wife, Karen, and their amazing daughter, Ella. Okay, I suppose I should, in the interest of full disclosure, say that Ken is my brother. But having given support to my Patreon page, to this podcast, he has gotten his free copy of---well, not free, but for the support, he has gotten with that a copy of my fourth Sam McRae novel, which is coming out this month, Deep Six. And by taking advantage of a limited time special offer, he was able to get this. So more of those are coming. So keep your eye on that Patreon page. I'll try to keep you updated as fast as I can. And, on that note, I'd like to introduce a very special guest. Not only is this author an investigative journalist and true crime author, he is also an Edgar award-winning author of the Saint novels, which is really cool in my book. How many of you remember the episodes with Roger Moore? I know I do. It's my pleasure to have with me today Burl Barer. Hi Burl. How are you?<br /> <br /> Burl: [00:02:26] Better and better every day, in every way.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:28] That's great.<br /> <br /> Burl: [00:02:30] There was a French psychologist named Emile Coue. And he believed that if you stood in front of the mirror and told yourself that like 20 times, that sooner or later you'd believe it. I've been trying it now for about 30, 40 years. I'm not convinced, but I'm giving it a shot.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:49] Yeah, it's very interesting because I've heard about that. It's kind of like ... Hmmm? Really?<br /> <br /> Burl: [00:02:54] Positive reinforcement.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:58] I think there's something to that. I think there's a lot to this whole idea of visualization and so forth.<br /> <br /> Burl: [00:03:04] I know. I've visualized a lot of really interesting things in my life that I'd probably be arrested for. But in the world of visualization, all things are okay.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:14] There you go. I was looking over your bio and bibliography and I was deeply impressed by the range of your work. Did you start your career as a journalist, in journalism as a writer?<br /> <br /> Burl: [00:03:31] Yeah, well, it's hard to say what we want to admit. I started my career as a small child. My mother was a newspaperwoman and my father smelled of elderberries. We have journalism and that sort of thing in the family history, family background. My mother was a newspaper woman. Her brother Sid Copeland wrote for Life Magazine, Time magazine. He was later Vice President of Cold & Weber public relations. My sister was a gossip columnist, I mean, uh, society editor. That's what you want to call it. And she wrote books and my cousin Helen writes books. My cousin Shoshana Barer writes books. I mean, it's kind of, you know, if you grow up in a family of opera singers, Debbi Mack clean 30:42 Interview with Crime Writer Tony Knighton – S. 5, Ep. 6 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-tony-knighton-s-5-ep-6/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-tony-knighton-s-5-ep-6 Sun, 01 Sep 2019 04:05:14 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18938 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Tony Knighton on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! Debbi: [00:00:08] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale. The nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my web site DebbiMack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: [00:00:59] Hi everyone. I'm very pleased to have with me today a crime writer who's also a working fireman or firefighter, if you will. He's a lieutenant with the Philadelphia Fire Department. If you'd like to enter a giveaway for a copy of his novel Three Hours Past Midnight, just go to my blog and look for his guest post. You can also find the guest post on my Patreon page. So, in any case, here he is, Tony Knighton. Hi, Tony. Tony: [00:01:34] Hi, Debbi. How are you doing? Debbi: [00:01:36] OK. How are you today? Tony: [00:01:38] Oh, swell. How about you? Debbi: [00:01:40] Not bad. Not bad at all. You know, it's Friday and the weekend's coming. Tony: [00:01:48] Yeah, yeah. Debbi: [00:01:48] Let's see. I am reading your novella, Happy Hour and Other Philadelphia Cruelties? I have to say, the first chapter left me breathless. Tony: [00:01:59] Oh, thank you. Debbi: [00:02:02] You write a very fast-paced story. Would you say that's part of your style? Tony: [00:02:09] Yeah. Yeah. That's fair enough. Debbi: [00:02:12] Yeah. How would you describe your writing generally? Do you consider yourself hardboiled or noir? Is there a difference? Tony: [00:02:22] Sort of both. I heard Duane Swierczynski, another Philadelphian, talking about the subject, and he says the difference all counts on the ending. If it's a positive ending, you just wrote hardboiled. If it's a negative ending, you write noir. I think that's at least an interesting explanation. My stories are a little bit of both, I think. Happy Hour is definitely noir. "If it's a positive ending, you just wrote hardboiled. If it's a negative ending, you write noir. I think that's at least an interesting explanation. My stories are a little bit of both, I think." Debbi: [00:03:16] So a little bit of both then. Tony: [00:03:19] Yeah. Debbi: [00:03:20] Do you focus more on mystery or kind of like thriller-type stuff, suspense. Tony: [00:03:26] Most of my stuff I guess falls into the category of crime fiction. My novel sort of ended up being a mystery, too. But I've always been a little bit more interested in will they get away? That just seems to be my preference or the kind of stuff I end up writing. Debbi: [00:03:58] Gotcha. So tell us about Three Hours Past Midnight. What is the book about? Tony: [00:04:09] That story ... it features a character that I wrote in a short story. And in that story ... Debbi: [00:04:20] You're trailing off a little bit, sometimes. Tony: [00:04:23] I'm sorry. Yeah. The novel features a character that I started in a short story, and by the end of the story, the guy was still alive. Then I realized I kind of liked him. And I'd had an idea for the novel. The crime involved in the novel and I just sort of have never been able to see who would do it. And I see this guy now. It's basically two guys who are burglarizing the home of a crooked politician who ended up in jail. They believe there's a wall safe and a lot of money in it. They indeed find the safe and get away with it. And, very shortly, one of them is killed and the safe [illegible]. The rest of the book is basically the other guy, main guy, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Tony Knighton on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! - Debbi: [00:00:08] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Tony Knighton on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:08] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale. The nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my web site DebbiMack.com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:59] Hi everyone. I'm very pleased to have with me today a crime writer who's also a working fireman or firefighter, if you will. He's a lieutenant with the Philadelphia Fire Department. If you'd like to enter a giveaway for a copy of his novel Three Hours Past Midnight, just go to my blog and look for his guest post. You can also find the guest post on my Patreon page. So, in any case, here he is, Tony Knighton. Hi, Tony.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Tony: [00:01:34] Hi, Debbi. How are you doing?<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:36] OK. How are you today?<br /> <br /> Tony: [00:01:38] Oh, swell. How about you?<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:40] Not bad. Not bad at all. You know, it's Friday and the weekend's coming.<br /> <br /> Tony: [00:01:48] Yeah, yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:48] Let's see. I am reading your novella, Happy Hour and Other Philadelphia Cruelties? I have to say, the first chapter left me breathless.<br /> <br /> Tony: [00:01:59] Oh, thank you.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:02] You write a very fast-paced story. Would you say that's part of your style?<br /> <br /> Tony: [00:02:09] Yeah. Yeah. That's fair enough.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:12] Yeah. How would you describe your writing generally? Do you consider yourself hardboiled or noir? Is there a difference?<br /> <br /> Tony: [00:02:22] Sort of both. I heard Duane Swierczynski, another Philadelphian, talking about the subject, and he says the difference all counts on the ending. If it's a positive ending, you just wrote hardboiled. If it's a negative ending, you write noir. I think that's at least an interesting explanation. My stories are a little bit of both, I think. Happy Hour is definitely noir.<br /> <br /> "If it's a positive ending, you just wrote hardboiled. If it's a negative ending, you write noir. I think that's at least an interesting explanation. My stories are a little bit of both, I think."<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:16] So a little bit of both then.<br /> <br /> Tony: [00:03:19] Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:20] Do you focus more on mystery or kind of like thriller-type stuff, suspense.<br /> <br /> Tony: [00:03:26] Most of my stuff I guess falls into the category of crime fiction. My novel sort of ended up being a mystery, too. But I've always been a little bit more interested in will they get away? That just seems to be my preference or the kind of stuff I end up writing.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:58] Gotcha. So tell us about Three Hours Past Midnight. What is the book about?<br /> <br /> Tony: [00:04:09] That story ... it features a character that I wrote in a short story. And in that story ...<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:04:20] You're trailing off a little bit, sometimes.<br /> <br /> Tony: [00:04:23] I'm sorry. Yeah. The novel features a character that I started in a short story, and by the end of the story, the guy was still alive. Then I realized I kind of liked him. And I'd had an idea for the novel. The crime involved in the novel and I just sort of have never been able to see who would do it. And I see this guy now. It's basically two guys who are burglarizing the home of a crooked... Debbi Mack clean 20:31 Interview with Crime Writer Bill Brier – S. 5, Ep. 5 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-crime-writer-bill-brier-s-5-ep-5/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-crime-writer-bill-brier-s-5-ep-5 Sun, 18 Aug 2019 04:05:54 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18873 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Bill Brier on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! Debbi [00:00:13]: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale; the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, www.debbimack.com under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi [00:01:02]: Hi, everyone. Today, we have a crime fiction author who has a most interesting background. Before he began writing books, he worked in the film industry in different capacities. He also drives race cars. Now, he writes mysteries and thrillers. I'm pleased to have with me today, the award-winning author, Bill Brier. Hi, Bill, how you doing today? Bill Brier [00:01:28]: Hi, fine. How are you doing, Debbi? Debbi [00:01:30]: Okay. Um, where are you coming from today? Bill [00:01:38]: Thousand Oaks, California. I live in California. Debbi [00:01:41]: Ah, very nice. So, let's talk about your books. I'm in the midst of reading The Devil Orders Take-out, a standalone thriller. Was that your first novel? Bill [00:01:55]: Yes, uh-huh, it was. Debbi [00:01:57]: Okay. And what prompted you to write that particular story? Bill [00:02:02]: Well, that story started with—I was actually going to do a story about a talking dog, and I wrote maybe 50 pages of a young teenaged golfer who had this dog that would retrieve golf balls. And after about 50 pages, I realized this was working very well, so I scrapped it and started all over again. And I kept the character, the young boy, he was actually a teenager and eliminated the dog and the story went from there. Debbi [00:02:44]: Hmm, interesting. And can you tell us a little bit about the story? Bill [00:02:49]: Sure. It has to do with a mob boss and a first-rate tax lawyer who get into battles; life-and-death battles. The lawyer had a son murdered and, in trying to seek revenge, he sought out this crime boss. Now, prior to this, the crime boss had come up and approached the attorney asking him to settle an IRS case because he was being audited and he knew that this lawyer was the best there is. The lawyer refused to take the case and the crime boss was very upset with him. Later, the lawyer’s son and wife get killed through circumstances and there was a person who was responsible for this death, and the lawyer wanted retribution. Well, he bought a gun but he lost his nerve, so he remembered the crime boss. He approached the crime boss and said, ”Okay, I will do your taxes, you take care of rubbing out this person.” And what happens is that the crime boss does do that, but now the man is indebted to the crime boss and a lot of mystery and other things happen. And the son of the lawyer turns out to be a gifted golfer and the crime boss threatens to kill the kid—he was only maybe eight years old at this time—because he was mad at the lawyer. So, they are in the office, the crime boss’ office, and he says, “You're gonna get it hard, Bolt. You're not gonna like it, but I'm going to kill your son.” And the lawyer looks on the wall behind the crime boss and sees a picture of him playing golf with Lee Trevino, a professional golfer at the time, so he catches on that he likes golf. So, he says, “If you kill me, you'll miss out on making millions of dollars.” “Oh yeah, you tell me how that's gonna happen”, the crime boss says. Well, thinking quickly, he says “my son is a gifted golfer” and he's gonna win what would be the Masters. Debbi [00:05:58]: By the way, you don't have to give away all the spoilers here [l... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Bill Brier on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! - Debbi [00:00:13]: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Bill Brier on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy!<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:00:13]: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale; the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, www.debbimack.com under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:02]: Hi, everyone. Today, we have a crime fiction author who has a most interesting background. Before he began writing books, he worked in the film industry in different capacities. He also drives race cars. Now, he writes mysteries and thrillers. I'm pleased to have with me today, the award-winning author, Bill Brier. Hi, Bill, how you doing today?<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Bill Brier [00:01:28]: Hi, fine. How are you doing, Debbi?<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:30]: Okay. Um, where are you coming from today?<br /> <br /> Bill [00:01:38]: Thousand Oaks, California. I live in California.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:41]: Ah, very nice. So, let's talk about your books. I'm in the midst of reading The Devil Orders Take-out, a standalone thriller. Was that your first novel?<br /> <br /> Bill [00:01:55]: Yes, uh-huh, it was.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:57]: Okay. And what prompted you to write that particular story?<br /> <br /> Bill [00:02:02]: Well, that story started with—I was actually going to do a story about a talking dog, and I wrote maybe 50 pages of a young teenaged golfer who had this dog that would retrieve golf balls. And after about 50 pages, I realized this was working very well, so I scrapped it and started all over again. And I kept the character, the young boy, he was actually a teenager and eliminated the dog and the story went from there.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:02:44]: Hmm, interesting. And can you tell us a little bit about the story?<br /> <br /> Bill [00:02:49]: Sure. It has to do with a mob boss and a first-rate tax lawyer who get into battles; life-and-death battles. The lawyer had a son murdered and, in trying to seek revenge, he sought out this crime boss. Now, prior to this, the crime boss had come up and approached the attorney asking him to settle an IRS case because he was being audited and he knew that this lawyer was the best there is. The lawyer refused to take the case and the crime boss was very upset with him. Later, the lawyer’s son and wife get killed through circumstances and there was a person who was responsible for this death, and the lawyer wanted retribution. Well, he bought a gun but he lost his nerve, so he remembered the crime boss. He approached the crime boss and said, ”Okay, I will do your taxes, you take care of rubbing out this person.” And what happens is that the crime boss does do that, but now the man is indebted to the crime boss and a lot of mystery and other things happen. And the son of the lawyer turns out to be a gifted golfer and the crime boss threatens to kill the kid—he was only maybe eight years old at this time—because he was mad at the lawyer. So, they are in the office, the crime boss’ office, and he says, “You're gonna get it hard, Bolt. You're not gonna like it, but I'm going to kill your son.” And the lawyer looks on the wall behind the crime boss and sees a picture of him playing golf with Lee Trevino, a professional golfer at the time, so he catches on that he likes golf. So, he says, “If you kill me, you'll miss out on making millions of dollars.” “Oh yeah, you tell me how that's gonna happen”, the crime boss says. Well, Debbi Mack clean 20:16 Interview with Crime Writer Robert Crais – S. 5, Ep. 4 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-robert-crais-s-5-ep-4/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-robert-crais-s-5-ep-4 Sun, 11 Aug 2019 04:05:08 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18833 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Robert Crais on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! Debbi [00:00:13]: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale; the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, www.debbimack.com under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi [00:01:02]: Hi everyone, I'm pleased to have with me today an author whose books I'm quite familiar with and whose writing inspires me. His latest novel is ‘A Dangerous Man’, the 18th book in the Elvis Cole/Joe Pike series. He's also written other series and non-series books. Our guest today is bestselling author, Robert Crais. Hi, Robert, thanks for being with us today. Robert [00:01:28]: Debbi, it's a pleasure to be here. Thank you. Debbi [00:01:31]: That's awesome. Well, I am thrilled to have you on. Before I get to your latest book, tell us about Elvis and Joe. Who are these guys and what brought them together as a team? Robert [00:01:42]: Well, Elvis Cole, my core character, the guy I'm known for most I guess, is a private investigator in Los Angeles. You know, when I created—I go back with crime fiction for a long time. I mean, I discovered Raymond Chandler when I was a kid and he was my gateway drug and I fell in love with this world. And I knew and always wanted to create a private investigator of my own and that was in the cards for me from early on. And when I created him, I guess you could say I took little bits and pieces—you remember Calvin and Hobbes, and Calvin had this cardboard box and he called it his transmogrifier. And he would get into the box and it would change; it would become a fighter plane or a speed boat or a motorcycle, whatever it was because it was his transmogrifier, this magical device. All writers have a transmogrifier, and I took little bits and pieces of myself and my sensibility and my worldview and I transmogrified myself very loosely into Elvis Cole. You know, he likes to talk, he's verbal, he's funny but he's so much better than me. And he’s one of these people I think I aspire to be, I wish I were more like Elvis Cole. Believe me, he lives a much more adventurous life than I do; I sit in a room and type. "All writers have a transmogrifier, and I took little bits and pieces of myself and my sensibility and my worldview and I transmogrified myself very loosely into Elvis Cole. You know, he likes to talk, he's verbal, he's funny but he's so much better than me." But I have also always been a fan of buddy pictures, going back to buddy comic books, you know, and buddy stories of all kinds. I think partnership is a natural order of things. And I wanted Elvis to have a partner and I thought, well, you know, what would be the most interesting partner is a partner who was completely different from Elvis. If Elvis is verbal, then Joe Pike is going to say very little; and if Elvis is funny and wears his heart on his sleeve, Joe Pike is going to show more emotion. And I began the creation that way. But what became apparent to me after a while is that there were reasons that Joe was so silent and Joe held his emotions in check and was such an internal character. And I began to sense that there was a well of great sadness in Joe and maybe even pain, and that made him enormously fascinating and interesting to me. Because what I've done over the course of all these books, 18 books now, is explore these two characters, to try to reveal little bits and pieces of why they are the men that they are; why is Joe that way; why is Elvi... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Robert Crais on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! - Debbi [00:00:13]: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Robert Crais on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy!<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:00:13]: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale; the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, www.debbimack.com under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:02]: Hi everyone, I'm pleased to have with me today an author whose books I'm quite familiar with and whose writing inspires me. His latest novel is ‘A Dangerous Man’, the 18th book in the Elvis Cole/Joe Pike series. He's also written other series and non-series books. Our guest today is bestselling author, Robert Crais. Hi, Robert, thanks for being with us today.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Robert [00:01:28]: Debbi, it's a pleasure to be here. Thank you.<br /> <br /> Debbi [00:01:31]: That's awesome. Well, I am thrilled to have you on. Before I get to your latest book, tell us about Elvis and Joe. Who are these guys and what brought them together as a team?<br /> <br /> Robert [00:01:42]: Well, Elvis Cole, my core character, the guy I'm known for most I guess, is a private investigator in Los Angeles. You know, when I created—I go back with crime fiction for a long time. I mean, I discovered Raymond Chandler when I was a kid and he was my gateway drug and I fell in love with this world. And I knew and always wanted to create a private investigator of my own and that was in the cards for me from early on.<br /> <br /> And when I created him, I guess you could say I took little bits and pieces—you remember Calvin and Hobbes, and Calvin had this cardboard box and he called it his transmogrifier. And he would get into the box and it would change; it would become a fighter plane or a speed boat or a motorcycle, whatever it was because it was his transmogrifier, this magical device. All writers have a transmogrifier, and I took little bits and pieces of myself and my sensibility and my worldview and I transmogrified myself very loosely into Elvis Cole. You know, he likes to talk, he's verbal, he's funny but he's so much better than me. And he’s one of these people I think I aspire to be, I wish I were more like Elvis Cole. Believe me, he lives a much more adventurous life than I do; I sit in a room and type.<br /> <br /> "All writers have a transmogrifier, and I took little bits and pieces of myself and my sensibility and my worldview and I transmogrified myself very loosely into Elvis Cole. You know, he likes to talk, he's verbal, he's funny but he's so much better than me."<br /> <br /> But I have also always been a fan of buddy pictures, going back to buddy comic books, you know, and buddy stories of all kinds. I think partnership is a natural order of things. And I wanted Elvis to have a partner and I thought, well, you know, what would be the most interesting partner is a partner who was completely different from Elvis. If Elvis is verbal, then Joe Pike is going to say very little; and if Elvis is funny and wears his heart on his sleeve, Joe Pike is going to show more emotion. And I began the creation that way. But what became apparent to me after a while is that there were reasons that Joe was so silent and Joe held his emotions in check and was such an internal character. And I began to sense that there was a well of great sadness in Joe and maybe even pain, and that made him enormously fascinating and interesting to me. Because what I've done over the course of all these books, 18 books now, Debbi Mack clean 23:03 Interview with Crime Writer David Putnam – S. 5, Ep. 3 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-crime-writer-david-putnam-s-5-ep-3/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-crime-writer-david-putnam-s-5-ep-3 Sun, 04 Aug 2019 02:01:50 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18771 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer David Putnam on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! 00:13 Debbi: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale; the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, www[dot]debbimack[dot]com under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: [00:01:03] Today we have an author with an extensive and impressive background in law enforcement. He's worked in narcotics with the FBI on violent crimes. He's worked on a SWAT team. He was with the U.S. Marshalls. He was co-sworn in as a U.S. Marshall, among other things. And, according to his bio, was a member of the real life Hawaii Five-O, which I found very interesting. In any case, it's pretty clear where this author gets his material. Today's guest is bestselling author David Putnam. Hi, David. It's great to have my show today. David: [00:01:48] Thank you for having me. Debbi: [00:01:49] Oh, it's my pleasure. Thank you. Tell us about your protagonist, Bruno Johnson, and what prompted you to write about that character? What prompted you to create that particular kind of character? David: [00:02:03] Well, that's kind of a long explanation. I've been writing since like 1989. And I was constantly writing. I'd written 38 manuscripts when I finally sold my 34th manuscript, and I was trying everything. I tried police procedural, mystery, young adult, sci-fi. And I had four agents. I had a 156 rejections when I quit counting. And Bruno Johnson was just another one of those attempts to try to find a market for my writing. And Bruno Johnson, he is an ex-cop, ex-con who rescues children from toxic homes in South Central Los Angeles. He couldn't do it when he was a cop because there's too many rules and regulations. So now he goes outside the law to rescue the children. I chose Bruno and made him an African-American, because it adds an extra layer of conflict. When I was working for the sheriff's department, I left the jail after six months and went to work patrol in South Central Los Angeles. I went out with two African-American deputies and one was a good friend of mine. I got to see firsthand the added layer of conflict that he had to deal with. I thought that would work well in my books. So that's why I chose to do it that way. "When I was working for the sheriff's department, I left the jail after six months and went to work patrol in South Central Los Angeles. I went out with two African-American deputies and one was a good friend of mine. I got to see firsthand the added layer of conflict that he had to deal with. I thought that would work well in my books." Debbi: [00:03:25] That's very interesting, yeah. I'm reading your first in the series, The Disposables, and Michael Connelly called it "raw, powerful and eloquent", which I have to agree with. David: [00:03:39] Thank you. Debbi: [00:03:41] Did you have direct experience with seeing children in abuse situations? David: [00:03:47] Oh, yes. You know. Readers read for the emotion. That's what they're in the game for, they read for the emotion. And conflict is emotion. So I thought that I would also write about something that was most emotional to me, and the most difficult part of law enforcement was dealing with children who were abused, because they had no advocate except for law enforcement or social services. Debbi: [00:04:15] Yes. And social services can often be . . . David: [00:04:21] Overwhelmed. Debbi: [00:04:21] Overwhelmed, yes. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer David Putnam on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! - 00:13 Debbi: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer David Putnam on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy!<br /> <br /> 00:13 Debbi: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I’ll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale; the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, www[dot]debbimack[dot]com under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You’ll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:03] Today we have an author with an extensive and impressive background in law enforcement. He's worked in narcotics with the FBI on violent crimes. He's worked on a SWAT team. He was with the U.S. Marshalls. He was co-sworn in as a U.S. Marshall, among other things. And, according to his bio, was a member of the real life Hawaii Five-O, which I found very interesting. In any case, it's pretty clear where this author gets his material. Today's guest is bestselling author David Putnam. Hi, David. It's great to have my show today.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> David: [00:01:48] Thank you for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:49] Oh, it's my pleasure. Thank you. Tell us about your protagonist, Bruno Johnson, and what prompted you to write about that character? What prompted you to create that particular kind of character?<br /> <br /> David: [00:02:03] Well, that's kind of a long explanation. I've been writing since like 1989. And I was constantly writing. I'd written 38 manuscripts when I finally sold my 34th manuscript, and I was trying everything. I tried police procedural, mystery, young adult, sci-fi. And I had four agents. I had a 156 rejections when I quit counting. And Bruno Johnson was just another one of those attempts to try to find a market for my writing. And Bruno Johnson, he is an ex-cop, ex-con who rescues children from toxic homes in South Central Los Angeles. He couldn't do it when he was a cop because there's too many rules and regulations. So now he goes outside the law to rescue the children. I chose Bruno and made him an African-American, because it adds an extra layer of conflict. When I was working for the sheriff's department, I left the jail after six months and went to work patrol in South Central Los Angeles. I went out with two African-American deputies and one was a good friend of mine. I got to see firsthand the added layer of conflict that he had to deal with. I thought that would work well in my books. So that's why I chose to do it that way.<br /> <br /> "When I was working for the sheriff's department, I left the jail after six months and went to work patrol in South Central Los Angeles. I went out with two African-American deputies and one was a good friend of mine. I got to see firsthand the added layer of conflict that he had to deal with. I thought that would work well in my books."<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:25] That's very interesting, yeah. I'm reading your first in the series, The Disposables, and Michael Connelly called it "raw, powerful and eloquent", which I have to agree with.<br /> <br /> David: [00:03:39] Thank you.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:41] Did you have direct experience with seeing children in abuse situations?<br /> <br /> David: [00:03:47] Oh, yes. You know. Readers read for the emotion. That's what they're in the game for, they read for the emotion. And conflict is emotion. So I thought that I would also write about something that was most emotional to me, and the most difficult part of law enforcement was dealing with children who were abused, because they had no advocate except for law enforcement or social services.<br /> Debbi Mack clean 20:09 Interview with Crime Writer Earl Javorsky – S. 5, Ep. 2 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-earl-javorsky-s-5-ep-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-earl-javorsky-s-5-ep-2 Sun, 21 Jul 2019 04:05:39 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18732 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Earl Javorsky on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! 00:13 Intro Debbi: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale; the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, www[dot]debbimack[dot]com under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. 01:01 Debbi: Hi, everyone. Today, we have with us the author of one of the most interesting stories I've read in quite a while. When I say ‘interesting’, well, you'll see. But before I introduce him, I'd like to give a shout out to a friend of the podcast, Stewart A Williams Design. I can personally vouch for the quality of his work. He does my covers and he's absolutely fantastic. He runs a gamut of services, from typography, graphics, but his specialty is book covers; e-book and print. So, I highly recommend Stewart A. Williams. You can find his website at www[dot]stewartawilliamsdesign[dot]com. And with that now, I'd like to introduce to you the author of Down Solo and Trust Me, two very different thrillers that our guest is giving away. It's my great pleasure to introduce Earl Javorsky. 02:08 Earl: Great, thanks. Good to be with you. Debbi: Well, thank you for being here. Now, my introduction to your work was with Down Solo, and please tell the listeners about the main character, Charlie Miner, you know, the interesting part about him. Earl: The part that he’s dead? Debbi: Yeah. It kinda catches your attention right off the bat. Earl: Yeah, but he's not a zombie or a superhero or any weird thing like that. He's just a regular guy. He is PI, he has a drug problem. He wakes up dead at the morgue and there's a bullet hole on his forehead. And once he finds out he can move, it's like in the middle of the late night, early in the morning, the place is pretty quiet. And he finds a place to shower off. It's one of those hoses over a tub and he cleans himself up and steals clothes from another corpse and goes out. Gets a cab, on a mission, he's got to find out who killed him. It's pretty straightforward, isn't it? "He's just a regular guy. He is PI, he has a drug problem. He wakes up dead at the morgue and there's a bullet hole on his forehead." Debbi: It is, it’s very straightforward and a very intriguing premise. It kind of made me think of the movie, DOA, except instead of a guy who has been murdered but hasn’t died yet, you’ve got a guy who has died and wants to find his murderer. They're both trying to find their murderers but in different ways. What prompted you to write about a character in that particular situation? 03:48 Earl: I have absolutely no idea. So, I haven't been a ‘supernatural type’ reader, you know, since my early 20’s. I loved it then and then I went off into more conventional like Raymond Chandler and traditional mysteries and up to, you know, current great writers in that genre. And one day I sat down and I wrote the first page of Charlie Miner, of Down Solo and I had no idea what to do with it for like six months. And somewhere along the line, I went, okay, I got a guy, he's dead in a morgue, he's a heroin addict, let's make him a PI. Let's make his murder part of the case that he was looking into. Which case? How do we find out? And all of a sudden, I realized I could develop it and so I get him going home, finding out that his place has been searched and trashed. He gets access to his files and has to go through a bunch of files to find out which one maybe had to do with his murder and who the people were. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Earl Javorsky on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! - 00:13 Intro Debbi: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Earl Javorsky on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy!<br /> <br /> 00:13 Intro Debbi: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale; the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, www[dot]debbimack[dot]com under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> 01:01 Debbi: Hi, everyone. Today, we have with us the author of one of the most interesting stories I've read in quite a while. When I say ‘interesting’, well, you'll see. But before I introduce him, I'd like to give a shout out to a friend of the podcast, Stewart A Williams Design. I can personally vouch for the quality of his work. He does my covers and he's absolutely fantastic. He runs a gamut of services, from typography, graphics, but his specialty is book covers; e-book and print. So, I highly recommend Stewart A. Williams. You can find his website at www[dot]stewartawilliamsdesign[dot]com. And with that now, I'd like to introduce to you the author of Down Solo and Trust Me, two very different thrillers that our guest is giving away. It's my great pleasure to introduce Earl Javorsky.<br /> <br /> 02:08 Earl: Great, thanks. Good to be with you.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Well, thank you for being here. Now, my introduction to your work was with Down Solo, and please tell the listeners about the main character, Charlie Miner, you know, the interesting part about him.<br /> <br /> Earl: The part that he’s dead?<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yeah. It kinda catches your attention right off the bat.<br /> <br /> Earl: Yeah, but he's not a zombie or a superhero or any weird thing like that. He's just a regular guy. He is PI, he has a drug problem. He wakes up dead at the morgue and there's a bullet hole on his forehead. And once he finds out he can move, it's like in the middle of the late night, early in the morning, the place is pretty quiet. And he finds a place to shower off. It's one of those hoses over a tub and he cleans himself up and steals clothes from another corpse and goes out. Gets a cab, on a mission, he's got to find out who killed him. It's pretty straightforward, isn't it?<br /> <br /> "He's just a regular guy. He is PI, he has a drug problem. He wakes up dead at the morgue and there's a bullet hole on his forehead."<br /> <br /> Debbi: It is, it’s very straightforward and a very intriguing premise. It kind of made me think of the movie, DOA, except instead of a guy who has been murdered but hasn’t died yet, you’ve got a guy who has died and wants to find his murderer. They're both trying to find their murderers but in different ways. What prompted you to write about a character in that particular situation?<br /> <br /> 03:48 Earl: I have absolutely no idea. So, I haven't been a ‘supernatural type’ reader, you know, since my early 20’s. I loved it then and then I went off into more conventional like Raymond Chandler and traditional mysteries and up to, you know, current great writers in that genre. And one day I sat down and I wrote the first page of Charlie Miner, of Down Solo and I had no idea what to do with it for like six months. And somewhere along the line, I went, okay, I got a guy, he's dead in a morgue, he's a heroin addict, let's make him a PI. Let's make his murder part of the case that he was looking into. Which case? How do we find out? And all of a sudden, I realized I could develop it and so I get him going home, finding out that his place has been searched and trashed. Debbi Mack clean 21:49 Interview with Crime Writer Andy Rausch – S. 5, Ep. 1 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-writer-andy-rausch-s-5-ep-1/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-writer-andy-rausch-s-5-ep-1 Sun, 07 Jul 2019 04:05:45 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18673 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andy Rausch on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! Debbi: Hi everyone, this is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guests, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale, the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website www[dot[debbimack[dot]com under the “Crime Cafe” link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing. Debbi: So, well folks it's good to be back for a fifth season of this podcast. I got to tell you it's been cool and I'd like to thank the people, I think it's Kings River Magazine [correction: King’s River Life Magazine], who put up a nice mention of the podcast recently online. In addition, I'd also like to put in a good word for my cover artist, the one who works on my books, his name is Stewart A. Williams and he has a business called Stewart A. Williams Design, and I totally recommend him, highly recommend him for anybody who’s interested in self-publishing and finding a good cover artist. His website is www.stewardwilliamsdesign.com and with that, let's get to my guest. My guest today is Andy Rausch, he is the first guest of the season. He has that distinction, and he is a man of multiple talents. Andy is an author, a film journalist, a screenwriter, film producer, actor, and I believe, also a graphic novelist now. Did I manage to get all of it in, Andy? Andy: I think so, pretty much, you know. I do political activism. I do a lot of stuff. I'm busy. I'd like to think I'm good at some of them. I try, I try. Debbi: That's good. Well, it's a good thing to be busy Andy: Right and I write a lot of nonfiction, too, as you might have seen. About 30 of my books are probably nonfiction and then the other… I mean this year, I'll have my 38th book out and only one of them was self-published and I mean I know that's corny, because that stigma’s gone, but you know when I came up there was a stigma about self-publishing. So, I always thought, you know, you got to do it, but I mean some of the publishers they don't sell, so what's the difference, you know you might as well do it your way and get what you want done and I get that, I think that's amazing. But I do a lot. Debbi: Yes, yes, and keeping busy is good, as long as you're keeping busy with the right things. Andy: Right, right. Well, I figure if I stay busy with these things, it'll keep me out of trouble and unbusy with the bad things, you know? Debbi: Yes, yes, good point and just so you know, he's giving away kind of a two-book package. Is this correct, your latest novella Bloody Sheets and the anthology A Time for Violence? Andy: Right, so I just wanted to give away the books to, you know, bring it to more people's attention. I do work with a lot of publishers. Some of them are little, some are big. These are books that I'm very proud of that are with a smaller publisher, and you know, so whatever it takes to get readership I'm down for. I tell people if you can steal them, whatever you need to do. The publisher probably shouldn’t appreciate that, but my thing is just read them. I'll give them away, you know, I don't care and that's always been the way, I don't care to be rich. That’d be great, but I don't really care. I just want to get them out there. Debbi: All right, well, um, I have to ask you about the book I just finished reading, Elvis Presley, CIA Assassin? Oh, my god! That story is freaking hilarious. I felt like I was reading something out of Quentin Tarantino's movies. What prompted you to write that book? "Quentin had actually had an idea at one time before he made it, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andy Rausch on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy! - Debbi: Hi everyone, this is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andy Rausch on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below, or if you’re in a rush, download a copy!<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone, this is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack.<br /> <br /> Before I bring on my guests, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale, the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website www[dot[debbimack[dot]com under the “Crime Cafe” link.<br /> <br /> You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: So, well folks it's good to be back for a fifth season of this podcast. I got to tell you it's been cool and I'd like to thank the people, I think it's Kings River Magazine [correction: King’s River Life Magazine], who put up a nice mention of the podcast recently online.<br /> <br /> In addition, I'd also like to put in a good word for my cover artist, the one who works on my books, his name is Stewart A. Williams and he has a business called Stewart A. Williams Design, and I totally recommend him, highly recommend him for anybody who’s interested in self-publishing and finding a good cover artist. His website is www.stewardwilliamsdesign.com and with that, let's get to my guest.<br /> <br /> My guest today is Andy Rausch, he is the first guest of the season. He has that distinction, and he is a man of multiple talents. Andy is an author, a film journalist, a screenwriter, film producer, actor, and I believe, also a graphic novelist now. Did I manage to get all of it in, Andy?<br /> <br /> Andy: I think so, pretty much, you know. I do political activism. I do a lot of stuff. I'm busy. I'd like to think I'm good at some of them. I try, I try.<br /> <br /> Debbi: That's good. Well, it's a good thing to be busy<br /> <br /> Andy: Right and I write a lot of nonfiction, too, as you might have seen. About 30 of my books are probably nonfiction and then the other… I mean this year, I'll have my 38th book out and only one of them was self-published and I mean I know that's corny, because that stigma’s gone, but you know when I came up there was a stigma about self-publishing. So, I always thought, you know, you got to do it, but I mean some of the publishers they don't sell, so what's the difference, you know you might as well do it your way and get what you want done and I get that, I think that's amazing. But I do a lot.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yes, yes, and keeping busy is good, as long as you're keeping busy with the right things.<br /> <br /> Andy: Right, right. Well, I figure if I stay busy with these things, it'll keep me out of trouble and unbusy with the bad things, you know?<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yes, yes, good point and just so you know, he's giving away kind of a two-book package. Is this correct, your latest novella Bloody Sheets and the anthology A Time for Violence?<br /> <br /> Andy: Right, so I just wanted to give away the books to, you know, bring it to more people's attention. I do work with a lot of publishers. Some of them are little, some are big. These are books that I'm very proud of that are with a smaller publisher, and you know, so whatever it takes to get readership I'm down for. I tell people if you can steal them, whatever you need to do. The publisher probably shouldn’t appreciate that, but my thing is just read them. I'll give them away, you know, I don't care and that's always been the way, I don't care to be rich. That’d be great, but I don't really care. I just want to get them out there.<br /> <br /> Debbi: All right, well, um, I have to ask you about the book I just finished reading, Elvis Presley, CIA Assassin? Oh, my god! Debbi Mack clean 29:23 Interview with Crime Writer Joe Lansdale – S. 4, Ep. 23 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-crime-writer-joe-lansdale-s-4-ep-23/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-crime-writer-joe-lansdale-s-4-ep-23 Sun, 21 Apr 2019 04:05:17 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18388 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Joe Lansdale on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below, or if you're in a rush, download a copy! Debbi: [00:00:12]  Hi everyone, this is the Crime Cafe your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: The 9-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com under the “Crime Café” link. You can also get free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: [00:01:04]  It's my great pleasure to have with me today one of the most eclectic writers doing crime fiction, among other things. An author in multiple genres including mystery, westerns, horror, science fiction, and suspense, he has also written for comics, and several of his novels have been adapted for film and TV. My guest is none other than the very awesome Joe Lansdale. Debbi: [00:01:31]  Hi Joe. I'm so excited to talk with you today. Thank you so much for being here. Joe: [00:01:36]  Thank you, Debbi. I'm glad to be here. Debbi: [00:01:39]   It's so great to have you on. I first got to know your work as a reviewer for Mystery Scene Magazine actually. Joe: [00:01:45]   Really? That's a great mag. Debbi: [00:01:48]   Yeah, it's great, it was wonderful. I got these wonderful free books and I got to read them and talk about them. It was great! Joe: [00:01:54] (laughing) Debbi: [00:01:56]  So my Lansdale starter book was EDGE OF DARK WATER and, boy, that made an impression on me. Joe: [00:02:03]  I'm glad it did. Debbi: [00:02:04]   Tell me when you wrote it—did you think of it as a young adult novel? Because it is a very mature young adult novel, and I love that about it. Joe: [00:02:14]  No. I didn’t really think of it as a young adult novel. It was the first novel I did for my new publisher Mulholland, which is a branch of Little Brown. and it was just a story I wanted to tell. And I’ve always liked stories with young people as protagonists. In fact, I’ve written quite a few with young people as protagonists and so it just seemed natural to me and, you know, it just rolled out. Debbi: [00:02:40]   I know that feeling actually. The feeling that something is just rolling out. Joe: [00:02:43]  Mmm … it’s good feeling. Debbi: [00:02:45]   Yes it is! I have this one young adult novel I’ve done and it’s kind of like this real kind of variation from what I usually do. But the fact that you write in multiple genres to me is so encouraging, but let me get to the latest thing you have out which is in the anthology A TIME FOR VIOLENCE. Am I correct about that? Joe: [00:03:09]  Ah, yes, there is an anthology that has my story in it among others. Debbi: [00:03:14]   I got to tell you, I love that story. It was like the world’s most twisted holiday story. Joe: [00:03:22]  Thank you! Thank you so much. Debbi: [00:03:24]   It’s the highest compliment I can think to make for that particular story. It’s awesome. One thing I enjoy about your writing is the way you combine serious social issues with humor. Can you talk a little bit about Hap and Leonard and where those characters came from? Joe: [00:03:42]  Well, you know, Hap and Leonard really were an accident. I had a two-book contract for Bantam, which I was very excited about, for two crime novels, and the first one I wrote was COLD IN JULY. And when I finished COLD IN JULY, I thought, you know I’d like to write another novel that kind of has that old Gold Medal novel feel. Fawcett Gold Medal was a branch that did crime, and then there was another branch that did westerns, science fiction and so on. And I’ve collected those Gold Medal novels for years, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Joe Lansdale on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below, or if you're in a rush, download a copy! - Debbi: [00:00:12]  Hi everyone, this is the Crime Cafe your podcasting source of great crime, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Joe Lansdale on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below, or if you're in a rush, download a copy!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:12]  Hi everyone, this is the Crime Cafe your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: The 9-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMack.com under the “Crime Café” link. You can also get free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:04]  It's my great pleasure to have with me today one of the most eclectic writers doing crime fiction, among other things. An author in multiple genres including mystery, westerns, horror, science fiction, and suspense, he has also written for comics, and several of his novels have been adapted for film and TV. My guest is none other than the very awesome Joe Lansdale.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:31]  Hi Joe. I'm so excited to talk with you today. Thank you so much for being here.<br /> <br /> Joe: [00:01:36]  Thank you, Debbi. I'm glad to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:39]   It's so great to have you on. I first got to know your work as a reviewer for Mystery Scene Magazine actually.<br /> <br /> Joe: [00:01:45]   Really? That's a great mag.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:48]   Yeah, it's great, it was wonderful. I got these wonderful free books and I got to read them and talk about them. It was great!<br /> <br /> Joe: [00:01:54] (laughing)<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:56]  So my Lansdale starter book was EDGE OF DARK WATER and, boy, that made an impression on me.<br /> <br /> Joe: [00:02:03]  I'm glad it did.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:04]   Tell me when you wrote it—did you think of it as a young adult novel? Because it is a very mature young adult novel, and I love that about it.<br /> <br /> Joe: [00:02:14]  No. I didn’t really think of it as a young adult novel. It was the first novel I did for my new publisher Mulholland, which is a branch of Little Brown. and it was just a story I wanted to tell. And I’ve always liked stories with young people as protagonists. In fact, I’ve written quite a few with young people as protagonists and so it just seemed natural to me and, you know, it just rolled out.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:40]   I know that feeling actually. The feeling that something is just rolling out.<br /> <br /> Joe: [00:02:43]  Mmm … it’s good feeling.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:45]   Yes it is! I have this one young adult novel I’ve done and it’s kind of like this real kind of variation from what I usually do. But the fact that you write in multiple genres to me is so encouraging, but let me get to the latest thing you have out which is in the anthology A TIME FOR VIOLENCE. Am I correct about that?<br /> <br /> Joe: [00:03:09]  Ah, yes, there is an anthology that has my story in it among others.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:14]   I got to tell you, I love that story. It was like the world’s most twisted holiday story.<br /> <br /> Joe: [00:03:22]  Thank you! Thank you so much.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:24]   It’s the highest compliment I can think to make for that particular story. It’s awesome. One thing I enjoy about your writing is the way you combine serious social issues with humor. Can you talk a little bit about Hap and Leonard and where those characters came from?<br /> <br /> Joe: [00:03:42]  Well, you know, Hap and Leonard really were an accident. I had a two-book contract for Bantam, which I was very excited about, for two crime novels, and the first one I wrote was COLD IN JULY. And when I finished COLD IN JULY, I thought, Debbi Mack clean 31:07 Interview with Thriller Author Jamie Freveletti – S. 4, Ep. 22 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-thriller-author-jamie-freveletti-s-4-ep-22/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-thriller-author-jamie-freveletti-s-4-ep-22 Sun, 14 Apr 2019 04:05:10 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18360 Debbi Mack interviews thriller author Jamie Freveletti on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you're in a rush, click here to download a copy. Debbi: [00:00:12] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. Before I introduce my guest, I just want to mention that there are some great new perks and features for readers who support the Crime Cafe Patreon campaign. You can access the Patreon campaign from my website DebbiMack.com. Debbi: [00:00:41] Today, it's my great pleasure to have on the show an award winning and internationally bestselling author of thriller novels. Specifically, the Emma Caldridge Series, which is totally awesome. I've read one of them, and they're absolutely fantastic. She has also written novels in the Robert Ludlum Covert One Series and, as the author of both crime fiction and true crime, I'm thrilled to have on today Jamie Freveletti. Hey, Jamie. It is so good to see you. Jamie: [00:01:18] Good to see you again. Even if it's virtual. Debbi: [00:01:22] Even if it's virtual. Yeah. Virtual beats no contact or falling apart. Well, I've read the first book in your series, and Emma Caldridge is just the most awesome protagonist. So smart, so resourceful, so kickass. Tell us about her, how you developed that character, and how she has developed over the course of your series. Jamie: [00:01:53] So, she's a chemist right. She's kind of like a female MacGyver. She came about, because I had written a novel, a manuscript I should say, and nobody had picked it up. And it's called BLACK MONEY. So I wanted to write something else. I love thrillers. I was at a 24-hour race with my husband. He's an ultramarathon runner, and he runs 24 hours at a time. So I went to this race. I was a handler. I used to go to make sure he didn't die. So, it was in Colorado. We had a freak snowstorm in the middle of the night. It was 70 degrees when they started. It was minus whatever and snowing on them. So one man passed out on the trail and got hypothermia. So I was in charge of dragging him to the hospital when I did that, and I started thinking you know he didn't know where he was, he didn't know his name. And that gave me the idea for a lot of things, because I thought, "This is kind of frightening." You know you "what if" and that always starts every novel, right? What if this happened to me? What if I got hypothermia or I was somewhere where I didn't know where I was. He was from England. You know, he was in a strange location running this 100-mile race. He was obviously in fantastic shape. But something happened. So that's why I put her, in RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL, I have her down in the Colombian jungle. I was thinking what would it be like if your plane is down. You don't know the east from west. You don't know where you are. You know the jungle in Colombia is landmined at the time. Since then, there's been a peace agreement. Treaty. But that's how it started. Debbi: [00:03:41] That's really amazing. It's just ... the story is just riveting. I mean that first one that I read, the first in your series? Just a page-turner. Totally. Jamie: [00:03:52] Thank you. Yeah. RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL started my career and got the awards and got everything rolling. That was really ... That's really the book that I still look back on with great fondness. Debbi: [00:04:05] That's awesome. That's wonderful. You have degrees in law and a postgraduate degree in International Studies. I take it that you've drawn upon your legal practice experience in your writing to a certain extent? Jamie: [00:04:21] I do all the time. When I was a lawyer, I did a lot of food, drug, and medical device, both regulatory and litigation. White-collar defense. And since Emma's a chemist, she's kind of fashioned on a bunch of the expert witnesses from the pharmaceutical companies that I used to work with. I love the experts. Debbi Mack interviews thriller author Jamie Freveletti on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below. Or, if you're in a rush, click here to download a copy. - Debbi: [00:00:12] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews thriller author Jamie Freveletti on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below. Or, if you're in a rush, click here to download a copy.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:12] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. Before I introduce my guest, I just want to mention that there are some great new perks and features for readers who support the Crime Cafe Patreon campaign. You can access the Patreon campaign from my website DebbiMack.com.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:41] Today, it's my great pleasure to have on the show an award winning and internationally bestselling author of thriller novels. Specifically, the Emma Caldridge Series, which is totally awesome. I've read one of them, and they're absolutely fantastic. She has also written novels in the Robert Ludlum Covert One Series and, as the author of both crime fiction and true crime, I'm thrilled to have on today Jamie Freveletti. Hey, Jamie. It is so good to see you.<br /> <br /> Jamie: [00:01:18] Good to see you again. Even if it's virtual.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:22] Even if it's virtual. Yeah. Virtual beats no contact or falling apart. Well, I've read the first book in your series, and Emma Caldridge is just the most awesome protagonist. So smart, so resourceful, so kickass. Tell us about her, how you developed that character, and how she has developed over the course of your series.<br /> <br /> Jamie: [00:01:53] So, she's a chemist right. She's kind of like a female MacGyver. She came about, because I had written a novel, a manuscript I should say, and nobody had picked it up. And it's called BLACK MONEY. So I wanted to write something else. I love thrillers. I was at a 24-hour race with my husband. He's an ultramarathon runner, and he runs 24 hours at a time. So I went to this race. I was a handler. I used to go to make sure he didn't die. So, it was in Colorado. We had a freak snowstorm in the middle of the night. It was 70 degrees when they started. It was minus whatever and snowing on them. So one man passed out on the trail and got hypothermia. So I was in charge of dragging him to the hospital when I did that, and I started thinking you know he didn't know where he was, he didn't know his name. And that gave me the idea for a lot of things, because I thought, "This is kind of frightening." You know you "what if" and that always starts every novel, right? What if this happened to me? What if I got hypothermia or I was somewhere where I didn't know where I was. He was from England. You know, he was in a strange location running this 100-mile race. He was obviously in fantastic shape. But something happened. So that's why I put her, in RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL, I have her down in the Colombian jungle. I was thinking what would it be like if your plane is down. You don't know the east from west. You don't know where you are. You know the jungle in Colombia is landmined at the time. Since then, there's been a peace agreement. Treaty. But that's how it started.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:41] That's really amazing. It's just ... the story is just riveting. I mean that first one that I read, the first in your series? Just a page-turner. Totally.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Jamie: [00:03:52] Thank you. Yeah. RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL started my career and got the awards and got everything rolling. That was really ... That's really the book that I still look back on with great fondness.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:04:05] That's awesome. That's wonderful. You have degrees in law and a postgraduate degree in International Studies. I take it that you've drawn upon your legal practice experience in your writing to a certain extent?<br /> <br /> Jamie: [00:04:21] I do all the time. When I was a lawyer, I did a lot of food, drug, and medical device, both regulatory and litigation. White-collar defense. Debbi Mack clean 24:14 Interview with Crime Fiction Author D.P. Lyle – S. 4, Ep. 21 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-crime-fiction-author-d-p-lyle-s-4-ep-21/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-crime-fiction-author-d-p-lyle-s-4-ep-21 Sun, 31 Mar 2019 04:05:53 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18330 Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction author and consultant D.P. Lyle on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! Debbi: [00:00:12] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMacke.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:01] It's my great pleasure to have with me today an author, forensics expert, and consultant. My guest has won and been nominated for multiple prestigious awards for his works of fiction, and along with writing numerous works of fiction, he consults with other novelists and television writers on shows that include: Law & Order, CSI: Miami, Diagnosis Murder, Monk, House, Pretty Little Liars, and more. My guest is none other than DP Lyle. It's so great to have you on today, Doug. Thanks for being here. D.P.: [00:01:49] Thanks for having me, Debbi, I appreciate it. Debbi: [00:01:50] To say that you have an impressive body of work is understating things. For the benefit of listeners, how would you describe the types of books that you write? D.P.: [00:02:01] Well, I write both nonfiction and fiction, but my fiction works are mostly darker thrillers. But my Jake Longly, my newest series is comedic thrillers. I like comedy. And, you know, I'm a funny guy. What do you mean? So I write these comedic thrillers, and I'm really having fun with them. I was working on the fourth Jake book this morning. So, yeah. Debbi: [00:02:28] That's awesome. Tell us about Jake, then. What's he like? What's that protagonist like? D.P.: [00:02:34] Well, there's a lot of me in Jake, of course, and there's a lot of Jake in Jake, but he's an ex-professional baseball player who now owns a bar in Gulf Shores, Alabama. And his idea of life is to own a bar and chase bikinis. And his father, Ray, is ex-military spook world, special ops guy who's a P.I. now. And he doesn't understand why Jake won't work for him. But Jake always ends up mainly through his new love interest, Nicole, gets drug into Ray's world and all these cases. So you would say that Jake is a reluctant P.I. He doesn't want to be there, but he always ends up there. Debbi: [00:03:18] Hmm. So the chasing bikinis part always makes me think of John McDonald. D.P.: [00:03:25] Right. Debbi: [00:03:26] So he's not quite the white knight. Or is he? D.P.: [00:03:29] Oh, no, no. No, Jake's got his history. He's got an ex-wife named Tammy the Insane, as he calls her, who actually married the attorney that handled the divorce and that kind of thing. But then so Tammy always calls Jake for advice, though she doesn't like him. And she argues with him all the time. But she always calls him for advice, and it drives him crazy. And then Nicole, his new love interest is hot, but smart and tough and clever and focused. And so she's different than Jake, too. Jake is kind of one of these guys that gets through life on good looks and wit and charm. But he gets forced into situations that forces him to use skills he had no idea he had. Debbi: [00:04:17] Mm-hmm. That sounds interesting. D.P.: [00:04:20] It's a fun story. They're all comedic based, I mean. They're situational comedy, so to speak, with a lot of murders. Debbi: [00:04:30] Oh, that's always cool. D.P.: [00:04:32] Yeah, exactly. Debbi: [00:04:33] Murder with laughs is always cool. D.P.: [00:04:36] Exactly. Debbi: [00:04:38] How did you end up focusing on forensic science? You practice cardiology, right. D.P. Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction author and consultant D.P. Lyle on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! - Debbi: [00:00:12] Hi, everyone. Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction author and consultant D.P. Lyle on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:12] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website DebbiMacke.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [00:01:01] It's my great pleasure to have with me today an author, forensics expert, and consultant. My guest has won and been nominated for multiple prestigious awards for his works of fiction, and along with writing numerous works of fiction, he consults with other novelists and television writers on shows that include: Law & Order, CSI: Miami, Diagnosis Murder, Monk, House, Pretty Little Liars, and more. My guest is none other than DP Lyle. It's so great to have you on today, Doug. Thanks for being here.<br /> <br /> D.P.: [00:01:49] Thanks for having me, Debbi, I appreciate it.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:50] To say that you have an impressive body of work is understating things. For the benefit of listeners, how would you describe the types of books that you write?<br /> <br /> D.P.: [00:02:01] Well, I write both nonfiction and fiction, but my fiction works are mostly darker thrillers. But my Jake Longly, my newest series is comedic thrillers. I like comedy. And, you know, I'm a funny guy. What do you mean? So I write these comedic thrillers, and I'm really having fun with them. I was working on the fourth Jake book this morning. So, yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:28] That's awesome. Tell us about Jake, then. What's he like? What's that protagonist like?<br /> <br /> D.P.: [00:02:34] Well, there's a lot of me in Jake, of course, and there's a lot of Jake in Jake, but he's an ex-professional baseball player who now owns a bar in Gulf Shores, Alabama. And his idea of life is to own a bar and chase bikinis. And his father, Ray, is ex-military spook world, special ops guy who's a P.I. now. And he doesn't understand why Jake won't work for him. But Jake always ends up mainly through his new love interest, Nicole, gets drug into Ray's world and all these cases. So you would say that Jake is a reluctant P.I. He doesn't want to be there, but he always ends up there.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:18] Hmm. So the chasing bikinis part always makes me think of John McDonald.<br /> <br /> D.P.: [00:03:25] Right.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:26] So he's not quite the white knight. Or is he?<br /> <br /> D.P.: [00:03:29] Oh, no, no. No, Jake's got his history. He's got an ex-wife named Tammy the Insane, as he calls her, who actually married the attorney that handled the divorce and that kind of thing. But then so Tammy always calls Jake for advice, though she doesn't like him. And she argues with him all the time. But she always calls him for advice, and it drives him crazy. And then Nicole, his new love interest is hot, but smart and tough and clever and focused. And so she's different than Jake, too. Jake is kind of one of these guys that gets through life on good looks and wit and charm. But he gets forced into situations that forces him to use skills he had no idea he had.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:04:17] Mm-hmm. That sounds interesting.<br /> <br /> D.P.: [00:04:20] It's a fun story. They're all comedic based, I mean. They're situational comedy, so to speak, with a lot of murders.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:04:30] Oh, that's always cool.<br /> <br /> D.P. Debbi Mack clean 17:57 Interview with Mystery Author Danny Lopez – S. 4, Ep. 20 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-mystery-author-danny-lopez-s-4-ep-20/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-mystery-author-danny-lopez-s-4-ep-20 Sun, 17 Mar 2019 04:03:15 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18242 Debbi Mack interviews mystery author Phillippe Diederich (writing as Danny Lopez) on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! Debbi: [00:00:10] This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest. I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, DebbiMack.com, under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Debbi: [00:01:03] Hi, everyone. I'm pleased to have as my guest today the author of the Dexter Vega Mysteries, as well as highly-regarded novels such as PLAYING FOR THE DEVIL'S FIRE, a young adult novel that has received a couple of honors in terms of Best Fiction and Best Young Adult Fiction. Again, it's a pleasure to introduce Phillippe Diederich [aka Danny Lopez] Glad you could be here today. Danny: [00:01:30] Hi. Thanks for having me, Debbi. Debbi: [00:01:32] Well, I'm just glad you can be here. And before we talk about your mysteries, let's talk about the novels that came before that. What was your first novel about? Danny: [00:01:44] My first published novel is SOFRITO. And it's a novel about a Cuban-American who was born in the United States, has a Cuban restaurant in New York, and he travels to Havana for the first time in order to steal the recipe that had once belonged to his uncle. And in the process falls in love, discovers his late father's past, and mainly it deals a lot with the different shades of ideas on why people leave Cuba. You know, not necessarily political. So it's a double love story. It's a return to your own roots. It's a foodie book. It talks a lot about food and the restaurants. And it's a bit of a tour of Havana. I've met some people who have read it and say, "Oh, we went to Cuba because we read your book." Debbi: [00:02:45] That's really cool. How would you describe it in terms of genre? Danny: [00:02:53] Just straight up fiction. I got into writing because I like stories. So I try to create a story for all of my books. There has to be something beyond just characters or pretty writing. One of the things that happened with SOFRITO is that I had spent a lot of time in the 90s in Cuba, in Havana in particular, as a photojournalist. So it was still a forbidden place for Americans to go to. So I thought it would be interesting to write a book based on this place. I was so close and yet so far. And I also wanted to write about the different opinions that Cubans and Cuban-Americans had about Cuba and the Castro regime, etc. It took me so long to write and revise and get it published that by the time it got published, Obama had lifted some of the traveling sanctions that he had on. So it worked out quite well, I think, in the end that it got delayed in publication. Yeah. I'm just after a story. So I would say general fiction, you know. I'm really rooted in the classics of the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. And they all have stories, great writing, great stories. And that's what I try to do. "One of the things that happened with SOFRITO is that I had spent a lot of time in the 90s in Cuba, in Havana in particular, as a photojournalist. So it was still a forbidden place for Americans to go to. So I thought it would be interesting to write a book based on this place." Debbi: [00:04:17] That's excellent. And that's really the whole point to write good stories. Now, your mysteries are written under a pseudonym, Danny Lopez. What made you choose to take on a pseudonym and why Danny Lopez? Danny: [00:04:37] So what happened is I publish SOFRITO, which is a general fiction book, I suppose. Debbi Mack interviews mystery author Phillippe Diederich (writing as Danny Lopez) on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! - Debbi Mack interviews mystery author Phillippe Diederich (writing as Danny Lopez) on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:10] This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest. I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website, DebbiMack.com, under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:03] Hi, everyone. I'm pleased to have as my guest today the author of the Dexter Vega Mysteries, as well as highly-regarded novels such as PLAYING FOR THE DEVIL'S FIRE, a young adult novel that has received a couple of honors in terms of Best Fiction and Best Young Adult Fiction. Again, it's a pleasure to introduce Phillippe Diederich [aka Danny Lopez] Glad you could be here today.<br /> <br /> Danny: [00:01:30] Hi. Thanks for having me, Debbi.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:32] Well, I'm just glad you can be here. And before we talk about your mysteries, let's talk about the novels that came before that. What was your first novel about?<br /> <br /> Danny: [00:01:44] My first published novel is SOFRITO. And it's a novel about a Cuban-American who was born in the United States, has a Cuban restaurant in New York, and he travels to Havana for the first time in order to steal the recipe that had once belonged to his uncle. And in the process falls in love, discovers his late father's past, and mainly it deals a lot with the different shades of ideas on why people leave Cuba. You know, not necessarily political. So it's a double love story. It's a return to your own roots. It's a foodie book. It talks a lot about food and the restaurants. And it's a bit of a tour of Havana. I've met some people who have read it and say, "Oh, we went to Cuba because we read your book."<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:45] That's really cool. How would you describe it in terms of genre?<br /> <br /> Danny: [00:02:53] Just straight up fiction. I got into writing because I like stories. So I try to create a story for all of my books. There has to be something beyond just characters or pretty writing. One of the things that happened with SOFRITO is that I had spent a lot of time in the 90s in Cuba, in Havana in particular, as a photojournalist. So it was still a forbidden place for Americans to go to. So I thought it would be interesting to write a book based on this place. I was so close and yet so far. And I also wanted to write about the different opinions that Cubans and Cuban-Americans had about Cuba and the Castro regime, etc. It took me so long to write and revise and get it published that by the time it got published, Obama had lifted some of the traveling sanctions that he had on. So it worked out quite well, I think, in the end that it got delayed in publication. Yeah. I'm just after a story. So I would say general fiction, you know. I'm really rooted in the classics of the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. And they all have stories, great writing, great stories. And that's what I try to do.<br /> <br /> "One of the things that happened with SOFRITO is that I had spent a lot of time in the 90s in Cuba, in Havana in particular, as a photojournalist. So it was still a forbidden place for Americans to go to. So I thought it would be interesting to write a book based on this place."<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:04:17] That's excellent. And that's really the whole point to write good stories. Now, your mysteries are written under a pseudonym, Danny Lopez. Debbi Mack clean 26:30 Interview with Crime Writer Ellen Kirschman — S. 4, Ep. 19 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-crime-writer-ellen-kirschman-s-4-ep-19/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-crime-writer-ellen-kirschman-s-4-ep-19 Sun, 10 Mar 2019 05:05:34 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18197 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Ellen Kirschman on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack.com, under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing. Debbi: [00:01:04] Hi, everyone. It's my pleasure to have as my guest today a crime fiction and nonfiction author who calls herself "A Shrink with Ink", and I don't think that's a reference to tattoos, although we could always find out. It's crime writer and psychologist Ellen Kirschman. Hey, Ellen, I'm so glad to have you on the show today. Ellen: [00:01:29] Thank you. Debbi. I'm glad, finally, at last to be here. Debbi: [00:01:35] Awesome. Okay. In your bio, you mentioned being born in New York City, but say you were born on the wrong coast. And I've often had that same feeling, because I love the West Coast. And you mentioned that you live in San Francisco. Ellen: [00:01:49] Right. I live in the Bay Area. Debbi: [00:01:51] Is that not the most awesome city ever? Ellen: [00:01:54] Yes, it is. I love it. Debbi: [00:01:57] I just adore it. What's your favorite part of living in San Francisco? Ellen: [00:02:02] Well, I live about 40 minutes south, so my favorite part is that I can get up to San Francisco in just 40 minutes in my car or on a train. So I have one of the world's most beloved cities right there at my back door. I love a lot of things about the Bay area. The weather even though we have peculiar four seasons out here: flood, fire, earthquake, and landslides, usually. But most of the time it's temperate and wonderful, and I love the vibe out here. I know many parts of the country see us as being pretty ... a little on the "too far to the left" side, but that suits me just fine. Debbi: [00:02:57] I know where you're coming from. It is a beautiful area, and I love the cable cars in San Francisco. That's one thing I love about it, and actually I used to live in Petaluma. Ellen: [00:03:08] Did you? Debbi: [00:03:09] That's about 40 miles north. Ellen: [00:03:13] Right. Also a lovely community. Debbi: [00:03:16] It is. It is very, very nice. Your first books were non-fiction. Can you tell us about them? Ellen: [00:03:23] Sure. My first book, which just what came out, the third edition came out last May is called I LOVE A COP: WHAT POLICE FAMILIES NEED TO KNOW. And I'd been thinking about writing that book for almost 20 years, if you can believe it. It was just knocking on the inside of my head. We do so much training for police officers, but it was so clear to me as someone who worked primarily with police officers that this job just spilled over to their family life and their home in not always a very positive way, because the paradoxes, the kind of skills that make you a good street cop don't make you a very good parent, spouse, friend. You've got to really learn how to shift gears. So I really wanted to write something that would help police families navigate what it's like to be married to this job that they didn't select most of the time. So the book has been, it's been very gratifying. It's sold well over one hundred and fifty thousand copies. It's kind of, as people have said, the Bible for police families, and it's gratifying to know that I've been able to reach that many people and the help that many people. "I really wanted to write something that would help police families navigate what it's like to be marr... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Ellen Kirschman on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Ellen Kirschman on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack.com, under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:04] Hi, everyone. It's my pleasure to have as my guest today a crime fiction and nonfiction author who calls herself "A Shrink with Ink", and I don't think that's a reference to tattoos, although we could always find out. It's crime writer and psychologist Ellen Kirschman. Hey, Ellen, I'm so glad to have you on the show today.<br /> <br /> Ellen: [00:01:29] Thank you. Debbi. I'm glad, finally, at last to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:35] Awesome. Okay. In your bio, you mentioned being born in New York City, but say you were born on the wrong coast. And I've often had that same feeling, because I love the West Coast. And you mentioned that you live in San Francisco.<br /> <br /> Ellen: [00:01:49] Right. I live in the Bay Area.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:51] Is that not the most awesome city ever?<br /> <br /> Ellen: [00:01:54] Yes, it is. I love it.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:57] I just adore it. What's your favorite part of living in San Francisco?<br /> <br /> Ellen: [00:02:02] Well, I live about 40 minutes south, so my favorite part is that I can get up to San Francisco in just 40 minutes in my car or on a train. So I have one of the world's most beloved cities right there at my back door. I love a lot of things about the Bay area. The weather even though we have peculiar four seasons out here: flood, fire, earthquake, and landslides, usually. But most of the time it's temperate and wonderful, and I love the vibe out here. I know many parts of the country see us as being pretty ... a little on the "too far to the left" side, but that suits me just fine.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:57] I know where you're coming from. It is a beautiful area, and I love the cable cars in San Francisco. That's one thing I love about it, and actually I used to live in Petaluma.<br /> <br /> Ellen: [00:03:08] Did you?<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:09] That's about 40 miles north.<br /> <br /> Ellen: [00:03:13] Right. Also a lovely community.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:16] It is. It is very, very nice. Your first books were non-fiction. Can you tell us about them?<br /> <br /> Ellen: [00:03:23] Sure. My first book, which just what came out, the third edition came out last May is called I LOVE A COP: WHAT POLICE FAMILIES NEED TO KNOW. And I'd been thinking about writing that book for almost 20 years, if you can believe it. It was just knocking on the inside of my head. We do so much training for police officers, but it was so clear to me as someone who worked primarily with police officers that this job just spilled over to their family life and their home in not always a very positive way, because the paradoxes, the kind of skills that make you a good street cop don't make you a very good parent, spouse, friend. You've got to really learn how to shift gears. So I really wanted to write something that would help police families navigate what it's like to be married to this job that they didn't select most of the time. So the book has been, it's been very gratifying. It's sold well over one hundred and fifty thousand copies. It's kind of, as people have said, the Bible for police families, Debbi Mack clean 22:33 Interview with Author and Screenwriter James Longmore – S. 4, Ep. 18 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-with-author-and-screenwriter-james-longmore-s-4-ep-18/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-with-author-and-screenwriter-james-longmore-s-4-ep-18 Sun, 03 Mar 2019 05:05:20 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18132 Debbi Mack interviews crime author and screenwriter James Longmore on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack.com, under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:02] It's my great pleasure today to have James Longmore as my guest. James is not only an author, but a screenwriter and a publisher. He has written and directed short films, as well, and even done standup comedy. So thanks for being here today, James. James: [00:01:21] Thank you for having me. Nice to see you. Debbi: [00:01:25] Sure thing. It's great to see you. You've done so many interesting things. Let's start with your writing, though. What do you write mostly? Is it mostly horror or do you do other genres, as well? James: [00:01:39] A lot of it seems to be horror, because that's sort of where my mind defaults to, but mostly, you know, dark stuff. You know, if it's dark, whether it's your crime or horror or dark romance or whatever. I think if it's got a dark element to it, then that's me. A dark comedy is what I'm a big fan of already, which is something we British people do incredibly well. Debbi: [00:02:08] I do love dark comedy, and that's pretty awesome. But let's see. You've written five novels, three novellas, and a bunch of short stories. James: [00:02:19] Right, yeah. Apparently so. Yes. On my resume. Debbi: [00:02:24] Are all of your novels standalones? James: [00:02:27] They are, yeah. I envy authors who sort of plan and write a series of three, four, five. We spoke to somebody recently who's planned a series of like ten books. Maybe I just haven't had the idea yet that it would sustain any sort of series. A couple of my novels I think would make a good sequel, but I just seem to like to move on to the next idea. I'm not one for rehashing, to be honest. Debbi: [00:03:02] Interesting. Or for stretching things out. James: [00:03:04] For stretching things out. Yeah, yeah, it's the same reason I tend not to commit to long TV series. A nice little 10-part series or an eight-part series, that's fine. But these that go on for like 13 seasons, it's just ... I just can't commit to that. Debbi: [00:03:27] And they tend to kind of run out of gas after a while if they don't do it right. James: [00:03:32] They do usually. I mean, I remember I really got hooked on Breaking Bad and that was just about the right length. I think it was seven, maybe eight seasons, and that was enough. But some of them, they just go on and it's like ... really should have stopped. Season Seven, you should have quit. But honestly. I mean, obviously, as long as people still watch it and advertisers still fork it out, they'll still keep churning them out. Debbi: [00:03:58] Exactly, exactly right. Can you tell us a little about Flanagan? What's the book about? James: [00:04:04] It's a sort of dark psychological sort of ... I don't like to use the word erotica, because it's not really erotica. It's about an everyday or seemingly everyday couple who have a couple of sort of weird ways of getting their kicks, and I don't want to give too much. It has a twist that I don't want to give away because it's one that people [won't see coming]. I swear you'd never see it coming in a million years. But, for me, because I like dark things, I like horror. You know, I mean for me one of the most horrific monsters, if you like, Debbi Mack interviews crime author and screenwriter James Longmore on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. Debbi Mack interviews crime author and screenwriter James Longmore on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host, Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack.com, under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [00:01:02] It's my great pleasure today to have James Longmore as my guest. James is not only an author, but a screenwriter and a publisher. He has written and directed short films, as well, and even done standup comedy. So thanks for being here today, James.<br /> <br /> James: [00:01:21] Thank you for having me. Nice to see you.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:25] Sure thing. It's great to see you. You've done so many interesting things. Let's start with your writing, though. What do you write mostly? Is it mostly horror or do you do other genres, as well?<br /> <br /> James: [00:01:39] A lot of it seems to be horror, because that's sort of where my mind defaults to, but mostly, you know, dark stuff. You know, if it's dark, whether it's your crime or horror or dark romance or whatever. I think if it's got a dark element to it, then that's me. A dark comedy is what I'm a big fan of already, which is something we British people do incredibly well.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:08] I do love dark comedy, and that's pretty awesome. But let's see. You've written five novels, three novellas, and a bunch of short stories.<br /> <br /> James: [00:02:19] Right, yeah. Apparently so. Yes. On my resume.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:24] Are all of your novels standalones?<br /> <br /> James: [00:02:27] They are, yeah. I envy authors who sort of plan and write a series of three, four, five. We spoke to somebody recently who's planned a series of like ten books. Maybe I just haven't had the idea yet that it would sustain any sort of series. A couple of my novels I think would make a good sequel, but I just seem to like to move on to the next idea. I'm not one for rehashing, to be honest.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:02] Interesting. Or for stretching things out.<br /> <br /> James: [00:03:04] For stretching things out. Yeah, yeah, it's the same reason I tend not to commit to long TV series. A nice little 10-part series or an eight-part series, that's fine. But these that go on for like 13 seasons, it's just ... I just can't commit to that.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:27] And they tend to kind of run out of gas after a while if they don't do it right.<br /> <br /> James: [00:03:32] They do usually. I mean, I remember I really got hooked on Breaking Bad and that was just about the right length. I think it was seven, maybe eight seasons, and that was enough. But some of them, they just go on and it's like ... really should have stopped. Season Seven, you should have quit. But honestly. I mean, obviously, as long as people still watch it and advertisers still fork it out, they'll still keep churning them out.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:58] Exactly, exactly right. Can you tell us a little about Flanagan? What's the book about?<br /> <br /> James: [00:04:04] It's a sort of dark psychological sort of ... I don't like to use the word erotica, because it's not really erotica. It's about an everyday or seemingly everyday couple who have a couple of sort of weird ways of getting their kicks, and I don't want to give too much. It has a twist that I don't want to give away because it's one that... Debbi Mack clean 20:39 Interview with Crime Writer Andrew Nette – S. 4, Ep. 17 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/interview-crime-writer-andrew-nette-s-4-ep-17/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=interview-crime-writer-andrew-nette-s-4-ep-17 Sun, 17 Feb 2019 05:10:54 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=18071 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andrew Nette on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack.com under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more, if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:02] Finally, I'd like to tell you about another podcast that might interest you. Kings River Life has a new mystery podcast called Mysteryrat's Maze. Episodes consist of mystery short stories, and first chapters of mystery novels, read by local actors. To listen to the episodes and subscribe to the podcast, you can go to mysteryratsmaze.podbean.com, iTunes and Google Play. Click the icon below to learn more. [00:01:33] Hi, everyone. Today on the Crime Cafe, it's my pleasure to have a writer of fiction, non-fiction, a reviewer, and a self-proclaimed pulp scholar. It's my pleasure, as I said, to introduce Andrew Nette today. Andrew: [00:01:54] Thank you, Debbi. Nice to be here. Debbi: [00:01:58] I'm so happy you can be here. Andrew: [00:02:00] Yes. It took a bit of organizing, but we did it. Debbi: [00:02:03] We did it. We did it. How would you describe your particular type of fiction writing? Andrew: [00:02:13] I think without trying to make it too complicated I like to say that I sort of write elevated sort of genre novels. It's hardboiled fiction with the sort of noir tinge, although I don't think you can call yourself noir. You have to let someone else call you that. But I do try and I do try and put a lot of work into them. I try to make the writing the best I can and I try and inject quite a bit of politics and setting into my into my crime novels. My second novel is called Gunshine State and it's a heist novel. It's a heist gone wrong novel. I love heist movies, and I've always wanted to write that Australian heist gone wrong novel, because there's so few of them. But it's also quite political and it's set in a number of places. It's set in Queensland, which is in northern Australia. It's also set in Melbourne. It's also set in Thailand, where I lived for quite a while. Debbi: [00:03:21] I see. Well, I'm reading it now and enjoying it very much. Can you tell us a little bit about your first novel Ghost Money? Andrew: [00:03:30] Yeah. Ghost Money, a novel dear to my heart. I worked as a journalist in Cambodia in the 1990s for a wire service for a while. I lived in that part of Southeast Asia for about seven years, and I spent quite a bit of time in Cambodia. I always thought Cambodia would be a great setting for a crime novel, partly because things happened every day in Cambodia. You just couldn't make up ... terrible things, but also wonderful things. Also, I'm fascinated by the notion of what constitutes justice and law and order in countries which lack a great deal of justice and law and order and which have had something like the Khmer Rouge that did the horrendous Pol Pot regime happened to them. But when I was working in Cambodia in the 90s, I always thought this would be really great to set a crime novel here. And I never got around to it. I was too busy working as a journalist, and then later on I sort of came back to it. That was in the mid-90s, and then basically in about 2007, my father died and I had this epiphany. I thought I have to write this novel. So my family and I went and lived in Cambodia for a year. And I wrote a novel that's called Ghost Money, which is set in Cambodia in the mid-90s. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andrew Nette on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Andrew Nette on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack.com under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more, if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [00:01:02] Finally, I'd like to tell you about another podcast that might interest you. Kings River Life has a new mystery podcast called Mysteryrat's Maze. Episodes consist of mystery short stories, and first chapters of mystery novels, read by local actors. To listen to the episodes and subscribe to the podcast, you can go to mysteryratsmaze.podbean.com, iTunes and Google Play. Click the icon below to learn more.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [00:01:33] Hi, everyone. Today on the Crime Cafe, it's my pleasure to have a writer of fiction, non-fiction, a reviewer, and a self-proclaimed pulp scholar. It's my pleasure, as I said, to introduce Andrew Nette today.<br /> <br /> Andrew: [00:01:54] Thank you, Debbi. Nice to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:58] I'm so happy you can be here.<br /> <br /> Andrew: [00:02:00] Yes. It took a bit of organizing, but we did it.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:03] We did it. We did it. How would you describe your particular type of fiction writing?<br /> <br /> Andrew: [00:02:13] I think without trying to make it too complicated I like to say that I sort of write elevated sort of genre novels. It's hardboiled fiction with the sort of noir tinge, although I don't think you can call yourself noir. You have to let someone else call you that. But I do try and I do try and put a lot of work into them. I try to make the writing the best I can and I try and inject quite a bit of politics and setting into my into my crime novels. My second novel is called Gunshine State and it's a heist novel. It's a heist gone wrong novel. I love heist movies, and I've always wanted to write that Australian heist gone wrong novel, because there's so few of them. But it's also quite political and it's set in a number of places. It's set in Queensland, which is in northern Australia. It's also set in Melbourne. It's also set in Thailand, where I lived for quite a while.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:21] I see. Well, I'm reading it now and enjoying it very much. Can you tell us a little bit about your first novel Ghost Money?<br /> <br /> Andrew: [00:03:30] Yeah. Ghost Money, a novel dear to my heart. I worked as a journalist in Cambodia in the 1990s for a wire service for a while. I lived in that part of Southeast Asia for about seven years, and I spent quite a bit of time in Cambodia. I always thought Cambodia would be a great setting for a crime novel, partly because things happened every day in Cambodia. You just couldn't make up ... terrible things, but also wonderful things. Also, I'm fascinated by the notion of what constitutes justice and law and order in countries which lack a great deal of justice and law and order and which have had something like the Khmer Rouge that did the horrendous Pol Pot regime happened to them. But when I was working in Cambodia in the 90s, I always thought this would be really great to set a crime novel here. And I never got around to it. I was too busy working as a journalist, and then later on I sort of came back to it. That was in the mid-90s, and then basically in about 2007, my father died and I had this epiphany. Debbi Mack clean 22:20 Interview with Crime Writer Matt Coyle – S. 4, Ep. 16 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-16-interview-crime-writer-matt-coyle/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-16-interview-crime-writer-matt-coyle Sun, 03 Feb 2019 05:05:37 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17953 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Matt Coyle on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale: the nine book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my Web site debbimack[dot]com under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon. Along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:02] Hi everyone. Today our guest is the author of the bestselling Rick Cahill crime novels. His books have all either been chosen as finalists or won various awards including the Anthony for Best First Novel. It's my pleasure to introduce our guest Matt Coyle. Hi Matt. Thanks for being here today. Matt: [00:01:25] Thanks for having me. Debbi: [00:01:26] Well, how is San Diego? Matt: [00:01:28] It is a beautiful day today. It really is. Debbi: [00:01:31] Oh God. Matt: [00:01:33] It's exactly the kind of day people think about what they think of San Diego. Debbi: [00:01:36] Yeah. I love San Diego. Such a wonderful city and the weather is fantastic. So tell us about Rick Cahill. Who is he and what's his story? Matt: [00:01:51] Well, when the first book opens, which is Yesterday's Echo which came out 2013, it's been about eight years for Rick since his wife was murdered. He was a police officer on the Santa Barbara Police Department, arrested for his wife's murder, but never tried. He was released but never exonerated. [00:02:13] So he was kicked off the force eventually and he moved back to his hometown of San Diego, went to work in a restaurant kind of behind the scenes and eventually worked his way up to manager. We had to be more out in front because when he was arrested for his wife's murder, obviously the press was all over him. There was a 48 Hours episode on it, on her murder, which made him look like he was guilty. So he had all that baggage since his wife's death. Now, in the first book, he's managing a restaurant, helps a woman in peril. Now in Book Five, which is Wrong Light he's been a private investigator for five years. And a radio station has hired him to try to find out the person who's calling himself Pluto, who this person is, and why he's harassing their breakaway talk radio star Naomi Hendrix, and bad things ensue. Debbi: [00:03:20] Uh huh. So in the bio that you wrote with your guest post, you credited Raymond Chandler with inspiring you to write crime fiction. What was it about his writing that inspired you? Matt: [00:03:34] You know I read him very young. My father gave me The Simple Art of Murder when I was ... I think I was 12 to 13, 14. Somewhere around there. And of course I read the short stories in the book and I read his thesis on writing detective fiction. I just liked the idea of someone living by their own code. He was a man of honor, but he had his own code. I always see the private eye as kind of a gunfighter who rides into town alone and has to deal with sometimes competing forces, and all he has is his honor and his code. And Rick's very much that person. He actually lives by the credo handed down to him by his father who was a disgraced cop before him, which is sometimes you have to do what's right, even when the law says it's wrong. And with each book, Rick takes that more and more extreme. "I always see the private eye as kind of a gunfighter who rides into town alone and has to deal with sometimes competing forces, and all he has is his honor and his code." Debbi: [00:04:21] There's almost a Dirty Harry-ish side to that sort of philosophy. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Matt Coyle on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Matt Coyle on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale: the nine book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my Web site debbimack[dot]com under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon. Along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [00:01:02] Hi everyone. Today our guest is the author of the bestselling Rick Cahill crime novels. His books have all either been chosen as finalists or won various awards including the Anthony for Best First Novel. It's my pleasure to introduce our guest Matt Coyle. Hi Matt. Thanks for being here today.<br /> <br /> Matt: [00:01:25] Thanks for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:26] Well, how is San Diego?<br /> <br /> Matt: [00:01:28] It is a beautiful day today. It really is.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:31] Oh God.<br /> <br /> Matt: [00:01:33] It's exactly the kind of day people think about what they think of San Diego.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:36] Yeah. I love San Diego. Such a wonderful city and the weather is fantastic. So tell us about Rick Cahill. Who is he and what's his story?<br /> <br /> Matt: [00:01:51] Well, when the first book opens, which is Yesterday's Echo which came out 2013, it's been about eight years for Rick since his wife was murdered. He was a police officer on the Santa Barbara Police Department, arrested for his wife's murder, but never tried. He was released but never exonerated.<br /> <br /> [00:02:13] So he was kicked off the force eventually and he moved back to his hometown of San Diego, went to work in a restaurant kind of behind the scenes and eventually worked his way up to manager. We had to be more out in front because when he was arrested for his wife's murder, obviously the press was all over him. There was a 48 Hours episode on it, on her murder, which made him look like he was guilty. So he had all that baggage since his wife's death. Now, in the first book, he's managing a restaurant, helps a woman in peril. Now in Book Five, which is Wrong Light he's been a private investigator for five years. And a radio station has hired him to try to find out the person who's calling himself Pluto, who this person is, and why he's harassing their breakaway talk radio star Naomi Hendrix, and bad things ensue.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:20] Uh huh. So in the bio that you wrote with your guest post, you credited Raymond Chandler with inspiring you to write crime fiction. What was it about his writing that inspired you?<br /> <br /> Matt: [00:03:34] You know I read him very young. My father gave me The Simple Art of Murder when I was ... I think I was 12 to 13, 14. Somewhere around there. And of course I read the short stories in the book and I read his thesis on writing detective fiction. I just liked the idea of someone living by their own code. He was a man of honor, but he had his own code. I always see the private eye as kind of a gunfighter who rides into town alone and has to deal with sometimes competing forces, and all he has is his honor and his code. And Rick's very much that person. He actually lives by the credo handed down to him by his father who was a disgraced cop before him, which is sometimes you have to do what's right, even when the law says it's wrong. And with each book, Rick takes that more and more extreme.<br /> <br /> "I always see the private eye as kind of a gunfighter who rides into town alone and has to deal with somet... Debbi Mack clean 17:02 Philip Marlowe in ‘Where There’s a Will’ – S. 4, Ep. 15 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-15-philip-marlowe-theres-will/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-15-philip-marlowe-theres-will Sun, 27 Jan 2019 16:19:32 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17903 This episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode “Where There's a Will”. I hope you enjoy the show! :) Be a doll and support the podcast on Patreon! :)     This episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode “Where There's a Will”. - I hope you enjoy the show! :) - Be a doll and support the podcast on Patreon! :) -   -   This episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode “Where There's a Will”.<br /> <br /> I hope you enjoy the show! :)<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Be a doll and support the podcast on Patreon! :)<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />   Debbi Mack clean 31:16 Interview with Crime Writer K’Anne Meinel – S. 4, Ep. 14 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-14-interview-with-crime-writer-kanne-meinel/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-14-interview-with-crime-writer-kanne-meinel Sun, 06 Jan 2019 05:05:30 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17864 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer K'Anne Meinel on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! And be sure to enter her five-book giveaway! Just click here. Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack[dot]com under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:03] It's my pleasure today to have on an author with more than 100 published works including short stories, novels, and novellas. She works in a variety of genres, including crime fiction of course, and she's a USA TODAY bestselling author. She is also owner of Shadoe Publishing, amongst her other accomplishments. So it's my great pleasure to introduce K'Anne Meinel. Thanks for being here today, K'Anne. K'Anne: [00:01:38] Thank you for having me. Debbi: [00:01:41] It's my pleasure to have you on. Glad you're able to be here. So you've written an impressive number of works. How long have you written and published fiction? K'Anne: [00:01:55] I've written all my life but I've actually only published about eight years. But I had books waiting. I wrote my very first complete novel in 2003 and I did it in two weeks. Debbi: [00:02:12] Wow. K'Anne: [00:02:13] Yeah. Debbi: [00:02:13] That's impressive. Was that your completed draft or did you have to amend? K'Anne: [00:02:21] I played with it for eight years before I actually sought out publishers. Got 20 rejection letters, and something told me to go with self-publishing which has worked for me. Debbi: [00:02:34] That's excellent. Yeah. K'Anne: [00:02:35] Once I published it, I did get approached by a publisher, and I should have read more of the reviews because they turned out to be con artists. I've never received any residuals. Debbi: [00:02:49] Oh my gosh. K'Anne: [00:02:49] They stole it, and then I got my rights back. Using my lawyers. And they've never stopped publishing it. They keep stealing. Debbi: [00:03:03] Oh, my gosh. That's awful. K'Anne: [00:03:05] Yeah, it was a horrible experience. That's why you know I caution people. Yeah. Anybody can call themself a publisher but watch what they do. Debbi: [00:03:15] Right. Absolutely. And self-publishing ... you have your own imprint. I also have my own imprint and I think that's very important. K'Anne: [00:03:23] Yeah. Because a lot of self-published authors, if they don't have a so-called publisher behind them, some stores won't even consider them. Debbi: [00:03:34] Yes, exactly. Exactly right. It gives you a more professional image. K'Anne: [00:03:41] It does. It does. And I've compared my paperback books to some of the so-called professional books. Some people that I may compete with or whatever, and I'm very pleased with what we've produced. And it was a learning curve. You know I didn't walk into this knowing anything, but I really enjoy learning. It's a challenge. I absolutely love formatting my books. Once the story is written, then tweaking all the little fine details like putting in a doodad here that most people wouldn't notice. But when you're looking at a paperback and it feels different, accordingly, and you don't know why, it's because of those details. Debbi: [00:04:29] Yes. Yeah I really like self-publishing and the flexibility that it gives you. K'Anne: [00:04:40] Well, they're trying to make it a little harder. I notice with CreateSpace going away, because Amazon is bringing it back under their umbrella and it's n... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer K'Anne Meinel on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript! - And be sure to enter her five-book giveaway! Just click here. - Debbi Mack interviews crime writer K'Anne Meinel on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below. Or, if you’re in a rush, click here to download the transcript!<br /> <br /> And be sure to enter her five-book giveaway! Just click here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack[dot]com under the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [00:01:03] It's my pleasure today to have on an author with more than 100 published works including short stories, novels, and novellas. She works in a variety of genres, including crime fiction of course, and she's a USA TODAY bestselling author. She is also owner of Shadoe Publishing, amongst her other accomplishments. So it's my great pleasure to introduce K'Anne Meinel. Thanks for being here today, K'Anne.<br /> <br /> K'Anne: [00:01:38] Thank you for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:41] It's my pleasure to have you on. Glad you're able to be here. So you've written an impressive number of works. How long have you written and published fiction?<br /> <br /> K'Anne: [00:01:55] I've written all my life but I've actually only published about eight years. But I had books waiting. I wrote my very first complete novel in 2003 and I did it in two weeks.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:12] Wow.<br /> <br /> K'Anne: [00:02:13] Yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:13] That's impressive. Was that your completed draft or did you have to amend?<br /> <br /> K'Anne: [00:02:21] I played with it for eight years before I actually sought out publishers. Got 20 rejection letters, and something told me to go with self-publishing which has worked for me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:34] That's excellent. Yeah.<br /> <br /> K'Anne: [00:02:35] Once I published it, I did get approached by a publisher, and I should have read more of the reviews because they turned out to be con artists. I've never received any residuals.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:49] Oh my gosh.<br /> <br /> K'Anne: [00:02:49] They stole it, and then I got my rights back. Using my lawyers. And they've never stopped publishing it. They keep stealing.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:03] Oh, my gosh. That's awful.<br /> <br /> K'Anne: [00:03:05] Yeah, it was a horrible experience. That's why you know I caution people. Yeah. Anybody can call themself a publisher but watch what they do.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:15] Right. Absolutely. And self-publishing ... you have your own imprint. I also have my own imprint and I think that's very important.<br /> <br /> K'Anne: [00:03:23] Yeah. Because a lot of self-published authors, if they don't have a so-called publisher behind them, some stores won't even consider them.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:34] Yes, exactly. Exactly right. It gives you a more professional image.<br /> <br /> K'Anne: [00:03:41] It does. It does. And I've compared my paperback books to some of the so-called professional books. Some people that I may compete with or whatever, and I'm very pleased with what we've produced. And it was a learning curve. You know I didn't walk into this knowing anything, but I really enjoy learning. It's a challenge. I absolutely love formatting my books. Once the story is written, then tweaking all the little fine details like putting in a doodad here that most people wouldn't notice. But when you're looking at a paperback and it feels different, accordingly, and you don't know why, Debbi Mack clean 28:17 Interview with Crime Writer Chris Roy – S. 4, Ep. 13 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-13-interview-crime-writer-chris-roy/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-13-interview-crime-writer-chris-roy Sun, 23 Dec 2018 05:05:06 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17813 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Chris Roy on the Crime Cafe podcast. Check out the show notes below. Or, if you're in a rush, click here to download the transcript! Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack[dot]com. Just click on the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:04] It's my pleasure to have my guest today crime fiction author Chris Roy. He's from South Mississippi and currently resides in the Mississippi Department of Corrections. So the audio might not be perfect. You'll probably hear a lot of background noise, but let's hope for the best. I would also like to mention that Chris has edited along with Andy Rausch A Time For Violence. This is his latest project. It is a love letter to the great anthologies of yesteryear. And the theme is violence. And I'll let Chris do the describing from here. Thanks for being here today, Chris. It's great to have you on. Chris: [00:01:55] It's nice to be here today. Debbi: [00:01:59] I'm glad you're able to be here and I think it goes without saying that your experiences have informed your fiction. Can you tell us a little bit about exactly how your experiences have inspired you to write? Chris: [00:02:18] Oh, sure. Some of my earlier works of crime fiction were short stories that had two characters I created named Razor and Blondie. This was about 10 years ago. They were based on personal experiences selling drugs, stealing cars, identity theft, that sort of thing. And also a lot tough crimes preferred from criminals while incarcerated. And so I had just had all this knowledge about crimes and also I found that when I was started writing these stories I like to create crimes, create new crimes. So I had all of this this knowledge to draw on and experience to draw on and that is where my original stories came from. Debbi: [00:03:16] Would you say to your genre is more geared toward noir or thriller? Chris: [00:03:26] It's noir definitely. My earlier works were thriller. There were anti-heroes and they had all these difficulties and there was usually a happy ending. The stuff I write now, terrible things happen to really good people and the endings are usually not very good. So it's definitely noir right now. "My earlier works were thriller. There were anti-heroes and they had all these difficulties and there was usually a happy ending. The stuff I write now, terrible things happen to really good people and the endings are usually not very good." Debbi: [00:03:52] I was going to say, yeah, I read your story Her Name is Mercie. I think I'm saying that right. and I liked it very much and your other book Shocking Circumstances. I've just started. And I'm interested that you focused on female protagonists. Can you talk about what prompted that? Chris: [00:04:19] Okay. When I was studying books on writing, when I started getting serious, the first story that I wrote after that was Shocking Circumstances and I was thinking you know I have a limited knowledge of skills that I can put into my characters you know. I was a mechanic on the street. And I'm a tattoo artist now. I studied engineering, metal fabrication. Boxing. I actually teach boxing and have for many years in here. You can hear in the background, there's a guy beating on his bag now. You hear that? That's one of my guys. I train. He's getting a warmed up for a workout. We're going to work out afterwards. After the podcast. So I had these skills, knowledge that I can put on my characters and s... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Chris Roy on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Check out the show notes below. Or, if you're in a rush, click here to download the transcript! - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Chris Roy on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below. Or, if you're in a rush, click here to download the transcript!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two e-books for sale: the nine-book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack[dot]com. Just click on the "Crime Cafe" link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [00:01:04] It's my pleasure to have my guest today crime fiction author Chris Roy. He's from South Mississippi and currently resides in the Mississippi Department of Corrections. So the audio might not be perfect. You'll probably hear a lot of background noise, but let's hope for the best. I would also like to mention that Chris has edited along with Andy Rausch A Time For Violence. This is his latest project. It is a love letter to the great anthologies of yesteryear. And the theme is violence. And I'll let Chris do the describing from here. Thanks for being here today, Chris. It's great to have you on.<br /> <br /> Chris: [00:01:55] It's nice to be here today.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:59] I'm glad you're able to be here and I think it goes without saying that your experiences have informed your fiction. Can you tell us a little bit about exactly how your experiences have inspired you to write?<br /> <br /> Chris: [00:02:18] Oh, sure. Some of my earlier works of crime fiction were short stories that had two characters I created named Razor and Blondie. This was about 10 years ago. They were based on personal experiences selling drugs, stealing cars, identity theft, that sort of thing. And also a lot tough crimes preferred from criminals while incarcerated. And so I had just had all this knowledge about crimes and also I found that when I was started writing these stories I like to create crimes, create new crimes. So I had all of this this knowledge to draw on and experience to draw on and that is where my original stories came from.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:16] Would you say to your genre is more geared toward noir or thriller?<br /> <br /> Chris: [00:03:26] It's noir definitely. My earlier works were thriller. There were anti-heroes and they had all these difficulties and there was usually a happy ending. The stuff I write now, terrible things happen to really good people and the endings are usually not very good. So it's definitely noir right now.<br /> <br /> "My earlier works were thriller. There were anti-heroes and they had all these difficulties and there was usually a happy ending. The stuff I write now, terrible things happen to really good people and the endings are usually not very good."<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:03:52] I was going to say, yeah, I read your story Her Name is Mercie. I think I'm saying that right. and I liked it very much and your other book Shocking Circumstances. I've just started. And I'm interested that you focused on female protagonists. Can you talk about what prompted that?<br /> <br /> Chris: [00:04:19] Okay. When I was studying books on writing, when I started getting serious, the first story that I wrote after that was Shocking Circumstances and I was thinking you know I have a limited knowledge of skills that I can put into my characters you know. I was a mechanic on the street. And I'm a tattoo artist now. I studied engineering, metal fabrication. Boxing. I actually teach boxing and have for many years in here. You can hear in the background, there's a guy beating on his bag now. You hear that? That's one of my guys. I train. Debbi Mack clean 26:52 Interview with Crime Writer Paul Heatley – S. 4, Ep. 12 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-12-interview-with-crime-writer-paul-heatley/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-12-interview-with-crime-writer-paul-heatley Sun, 09 Dec 2018 05:05:31 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17717 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Paul Heatley on this episode of the Crime Cafe. Check out the show notes below! Or, if you’re in a rush, download your copy here! Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack[dot]com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:02] It's my pleasure today to have as my guest the author of the Eye for an Eye series, one of which I'm currently in the midst of reading and thoroughly enjoying, as well as other novels and more than 50 short stories. Very impressive. I mean, it just amazes me. Anyway, from northeast England, it's Paul Heatley. Hi, Paul. Paul: [00:01:29] Hello, Debbi. Debbi: [00:01:30] It's great to have you on. Paul: [00:01:32] Thank you. Good to be here. Debbi: [00:01:34] Excellent. How would you describe your books in terms of genre or subgenre? Paul: [00:01:43] Crime fiction noir. That's the best way to describe them. Sometimes I set them in America. Sometimes I set them here in northeast England. I think it just depends on what kind of story I'm trying to tell and how I think it can be best presented. Some story ideas come to me and I just think that wouldn't work in England. [00:02:03] But I do watch a lot of American movies and a lot of American TV shows. I read a lot of American books and I think that's what has a big influence on me and why I end up setting things in America and why when I get ideas, after going through them. I'm like, "Is this English? Is it American?" And that's how the creative process grows as the setting process. Debbi: [00:02:24] That's very interesting. I noticed you did mention a lot of American authors as influential. James Ellroy, Jim Thompson, and Chester Himes being your big three there. And I've read all of them and enjoy all of them. They're great authors. Are there any particular books by them that you find particularly inspirational? Paul: [00:02:48] Yeah. For James Ellroy, it would be Black Dahlia. That was probably the first crime book I read that a big impact, because that was a big shock for me to see that crime fiction could be dark. And that sounds silly, but I read it when I was about 16 or 17, and up to that point, my only knowledge of crime fiction was ... it wasn't anything I'd read. It was adaptations of Agatha Christie, and you know, if you're not in that kind of thing, you're not going to be into that kind of thing. But then I read James Ellroy and you had these incredibly dopey policemen and sociopathic serial killers, and it was just something incredible to read and to discover and that's really what turned around for me. And Jim Thompson again, he came after Ellroy. And he was another one that kind of opened my eyes to what crime fiction is and what it can be, because at the same time as discovering Ellroy, I don't like police procedurals. On Paul's favorite books: "For James Ellroy, it would be Black Dahlia. That was probably the first crime book I read that a big impact, because that was a big shock for me to see that crime fiction could be dark." [00:03:48] And Jim Thompson doesn't write that. Jim Thompson, for the most part, writes from the bad guys' point of view and that's what I like. I like to read from the criminals' point of view. That's why I like noir. And Savage Night by him is my favorite. That's just totally off the rails. It's just great. Chester Himes ... anything, anything Chester Himes. I just think he's fantastic. [00:04:12] There's not a single book particularly stick... Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Paul Heatley on this episode of the Crime Cafe. - Check out the show notes below! Or, if you’re in a rush, download your copy here! - Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Paul Heatley on this episode of the Crime Cafe.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below! Or, if you’re in a rush, download your copy here!<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:00:13] Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack[dot]com, under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> [00:01:02] It's my pleasure today to have as my guest the author of the Eye for an Eye series, one of which I'm currently in the midst of reading and thoroughly enjoying, as well as other novels and more than 50 short stories. Very impressive. I mean, it just amazes me. Anyway, from northeast England, it's Paul Heatley. Hi, Paul.<br /> <br /> Paul: [00:01:29] Hello, Debbi.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:30] It's great to have you on.<br /> <br /> Paul: [00:01:32] Thank you. Good to be here.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:01:34] Excellent. How would you describe your books in terms of genre or subgenre?<br /> <br /> Paul: [00:01:43] Crime fiction noir. That's the best way to describe them. Sometimes I set them in America. Sometimes I set them here in northeast England. I think it just depends on what kind of story I'm trying to tell and how I think it can be best presented. Some story ideas come to me and I just think that wouldn't work in England.<br /> <br /> [00:02:03] But I do watch a lot of American movies and a lot of American TV shows. I read a lot of American books and I think that's what has a big influence on me and why I end up setting things in America and why when I get ideas, after going through them. I'm like, "Is this English? Is it American?" And that's how the creative process grows as the setting process.<br /> <br /> Debbi: [00:02:24] That's very interesting. I noticed you did mention a lot of American authors as influential. James Ellroy, Jim Thompson, and Chester Himes being your big three there. And I've read all of them and enjoy all of them. They're great authors. Are there any particular books by them that you find particularly inspirational?<br /> <br /> Paul: [00:02:48] Yeah. For James Ellroy, it would be Black Dahlia. That was probably the first crime book I read that a big impact, because that was a big shock for me to see that crime fiction could be dark. And that sounds silly, but I read it when I was about 16 or 17, and up to that point, my only knowledge of crime fiction was ... it wasn't anything I'd read. It was adaptations of Agatha Christie, and you know, if you're not in that kind of thing, you're not going to be into that kind of thing. But then I read James Ellroy and you had these incredibly dopey policemen and sociopathic serial killers, and it was just something incredible to read and to discover and that's really what turned around for me. And Jim Thompson again, he came after Ellroy. And he was another one that kind of opened my eyes to what crime fiction is and what it can be, because at the same time as discovering Ellroy, I don't like police procedurals.<br /> <br /> On Paul's favorite books: "For James Ellroy, it would be Black Dahlia. That was probably the first crime book I read that a big impact, because that was a big shock for me to see that crime fiction could be dark."<br /> <br /> [00:03:48] And Jim Thompson doesn't write that. Jim Thompson, for the most part, writes from the bad guys' point of view and that's what I like. I like to read from the criminals' point of view. That's why I like noir. And Savage Night by him is my favorite. Debbi Mack clean 20:57 Philip Marlowe Episode, “The Panama Hat” – S. 4, Ep. 11 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-11-philip-marlowe-episode-panama-hat/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-11-philip-marlowe-episode-panama-hat Sun, 25 Nov 2018 05:05:32 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17634 This episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode “The Panama Hat”. I hope you enjoy the show! :)             And don't forget to support us on Patreon! :) This episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode “The Panama Hat”. - I hope you enjoy the show! :) -   -   -   -   -   -   - And don't forget to support us on Patreon! :) This episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode “The Panama Hat”.<br /> <br /> I hope you enjoy the show! :)<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> And don't forget to support us on Patreon! :) Debbi Mack clean 30:12 Interview with Crime Writer Dana King – S.4, Ep. 10 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-10-interview-crime-writer-dana-king/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-10-interview-crime-writer-dana-king Sun, 11 Nov 2018 05:05:27 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17568 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Dana King on this episode of the Crime Cafe. Check out the show notes below! Or, if you're in a rush, download your copy here! Debbi M: [00:00:06] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. [00:00:25] Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale. The nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack[dot]com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon. Along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. [00:01:02] It's my pleasure to have as my guest today the author of two series and a standalone novel as well as several short stories. And he is also a Shamus nominee and nominee for other awards. [00:01:19] It's Dana King. Hi, Dana. It's great to have you on today. Dana K: [00:01:23] It's great to be here. Thanks for having me. Debbi M: [00:01:26] It's my pleasure to have you on, Dana. I was at the C3 conference with Dana, and he told the funniest story during Noir at the Bar. But we won't go into that. It was great, though. That was a wonderful take-off on the Sergeant Friday Dragnet thing. And had a lot of hardboiled humor in it. So I'm a big fan just based on that. So you have two series: Penns River and Nick Forte--is that correct? Dana King writes the Penns River and Nick Forte series. Dana K: [00:02:02] That's right. Nick Forte. That's right. Debbi M: [00:02:04] And is Nick Forte a private eye? Dana K: [00:02:08] Yes. Debbi M: [00:02:08] Okay, tell us a little bit about that series. Dana K: [00:02:12] He's a private eye based in Chicago. It got started actually you mentioned that the satire on the Joe Friday stories. He was the first character actually created. I was coming out of a musical career and I wrote a short story that was supposed to be a satire on Mickey Spillane that used a bunch of friends of mine as part of a story with a musical background to it. And it was so well-received by a lot of people I wrote another story about the job I was at and included them. Same type, too. He was investigating something at this job, and I went to another job and they read the other two stories and pretty soon I got to thinking maybe I should do something more serious with this character and that's where the idea for writing the novels came from. Nick Forte is a private eye based in Chicago. Debbi M: [00:02:57] Aha. Okay, and how did you choose Chicago as a location? Dana K: [00:03:03] I was living in Chicago at the time, and I really enjoyed my time there so there were a lot of locations, a lot of things about Chicago that came to mind when I was putting it together. Debbi M: [00:03:14] Interesting. And the Penns River novels. I'm reading one now and enjoying it. They're based in a small town near Pittsburgh, correct? Dana K: [00:03:28] Yes. Debbi M: [00:03:29] Because you are originally from that area? Click on the cover to check it out! Dana K: [00:03:31] Yes. Penns River as a town is actually an amalgam of three small cities about 20 miles up the Allegheny River from Pittsburgh, and I grew up sort of in all three of them. I was born in Warren and the hospital is no longer there. My parents took me to an apartment in another of those three cities. That building has since burned to the ground is now a vacant lot. And then I grew up in the third one and lived there--in fact, my parents lived there until just last year. My father passed. So I know not just the area, but I know the people, I know the kinds of things they are interested in. I had an idea for a police procedural story. I wanted to tell it. I needed a new setting, because obviously Forte wouldn't work for a police procedural. Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Dana King on this episode of the Crime Cafe. - Check out the show notes below! Or, if you're in a rush, download your copy here! - Debbi M: [00:00:06] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Dana King on this episode of the Crime Cafe.<br /> <br /> Check out the show notes below! Or, if you're in a rush, download your copy here!<br /> <br /> Debbi M: [00:00:06] Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack.<br /> <br /> [00:00:25] Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two ebooks for sale. The nine-book boxed set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy links for both on my website debbimack[dot]com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon. Along with our eternal gratitude for doing so.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> [00:01:02] It's my pleasure to have as my guest today the author of two series and a standalone novel as well as several short stories. And he is also a Shamus nominee and nominee for other awards.<br /> <br /> [00:01:19] It's Dana King. Hi, Dana. It's great to have you on today.<br /> <br /> Dana K: [00:01:23] It's great to be here. Thanks for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi M: [00:01:26] It's my pleasure to have you on, Dana. I was at the C3 conference with Dana, and he told the funniest story during Noir at the Bar. But we won't go into that. It was great, though. That was a wonderful take-off on the Sergeant Friday Dragnet thing. And had a lot of hardboiled humor in it. So I'm a big fan just based on that. So you have two series: Penns River and Nick Forte--is that correct?<br /> Dana King writes the Penns River and Nick Forte series.<br /> Dana K: [00:02:02] That's right. Nick Forte. That's right.<br /> <br /> Debbi M: [00:02:04] And is Nick Forte a private eye?<br /> <br /> Dana K: [00:02:08] Yes.<br /> <br /> Debbi M: [00:02:08] Okay, tell us a little bit about that series.<br /> <br /> Dana K: [00:02:12] He's a private eye based in Chicago. It got started actually you mentioned that the satire on the Joe Friday stories. He was the first character actually created. I was coming out of a musical career and I wrote a short story that was supposed to be a satire on Mickey Spillane that used a bunch of friends of mine as part of a story with a musical background to it. And it was so well-received by a lot of people I wrote another story about the job I was at and included them. Same type, too. He was investigating something at this job, and I went to another job and they read the other two stories and pretty soon I got to thinking maybe I should do something more serious with this character and that's where the idea for writing the novels came from.<br /> Nick Forte is a private eye based in Chicago.<br /> Debbi M: [00:02:57] Aha. Okay, and how did you choose Chicago as a location?<br /> <br /> Dana K: [00:03:03] I was living in Chicago at the time, and I really enjoyed my time there so there were a lot of locations, a lot of things about Chicago that came to mind when I was putting it together.<br /> <br /> Debbi M: [00:03:14] Interesting. And the Penns River novels. I'm reading one now and enjoying it. They're based in a small town near Pittsburgh, correct?<br /> <br /> Dana K: [00:03:28] Yes.<br /> <br /> Debbi M: [00:03:29] Because you are originally from that area?<br /> <br /> Click on the cover to check it out!<br /> <br /> Dana K: [00:03:31] Yes. Penns River as a town is actually an amalgam of three small cities about 20 miles up the Allegheny River from Pittsburgh, and I grew up sort of in all three of them. I was born in Warren and the hospital is no longer there. My parents took me to an apartment in another of those three cities. That building has since burned to the ground is now a vacant lot. And then I grew up in the third one and lived there--in fact, my parents lived there until just last year. My father passed. So I know not just the area, Debbi Mack clean 25:54 Interview with Crime Writer David Malcolm – S. 4, Ep. 9 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-9-crime-talk-david-malcolm/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-9-crime-talk-david-malcolm Sun, 28 Oct 2018 04:05:35 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17526 Debbi Mack interviews crime writer David Malcolm on this episode of the Crime Cafe. Interview highlights: David discusses his novel, The German Messenger, a historical espionage story. He covered the following topics: The role of historical research in fiction writing. The appeal of espionage fiction in a broader context. Authors who have influenced his writing, including Joseph Conrad's The Secret Agent and John Buchan's The 39 Steps. The influence of film noir on his work. His next project, a series of adventure stories. His advice for aspiring writers: "Writers write." For more detail, check out the podcast! And consider becoming a supporter on Patreon! I'm starting a special newsletter for Patreon supporters! Coming soon! Debbi Mack interviews crime writer David Malcolm on this episode of the Crime Cafe. - Interview highlights: - David discusses his novel, The German Messenger, a historical espionage story. He covered the following topics: - Debbi Mack interviews crime writer David Malcolm on this episode of the Crime Cafe.<br /> <br /> Interview highlights:<br /> <br /> David discusses his novel, The German Messenger, a historical espionage story. He covered the following topics:<br /> <br /> The role of historical research in fiction writing.<br /> <br /> The appeal of espionage fiction in a broader context.<br /> <br /> Authors who have influenced his writing, including Joseph Conrad's The Secret Agent and John Buchan's The 39 Steps.<br /> <br /> The influence of film noir on his work.<br /> <br /> His next project, a series of adventure stories.<br /> <br /> His advice for aspiring writers: "Writers write."<br /> <br /> For more detail, check out the podcast!<br /> <br /> And consider becoming a supporter on Patreon! I'm starting a special newsletter for Patreon supporters! Coming soon! Debbi Mack clean 28:43 Interview with Crime Author Gareth Spark – S. 4, Ep. 8 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-8-crime-talk-author-gareth-spark/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-8-crime-talk-author-gareth-spark Sun, 14 Oct 2018 04:05:17 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17466 This week, the Crime Cafe presents crime talk between Debbi Mack and crime writer Gareth Spark. If you enjoy this podcast, please feel free to share it! And please consider becoming a Patreon supporter. Thanks! :) This week, the Crime Cafe presents crime talk between Debbi Mack and crime writer Gareth Spark. - If you enjoy this podcast, please feel free to share it! - And please consider becoming a Patreon supporter. Thanks! :) This week, the Crime Cafe presents crime talk between Debbi Mack and crime writer Gareth Spark.<br /> <br /> If you enjoy this podcast, please feel free to share it!<br /> <br /> And please consider becoming a Patreon supporter. Thanks! :) Debbi Mack clean 23:24 Interview with Crime Author Michael Zimecki – S. 4, Ep. 7 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-7-crime-talk-author-michael-zimecki/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-7-crime-talk-author-michael-zimecki Sun, 30 Sep 2018 04:05:14 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17370 This week, the Crime Cafe presents Debbi Mack's interview with crime author Michael Zimecki. Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can provide podcast transcripts. Thanks! :) This week, the Crime Cafe presents Debbi Mack's interview with crime author Michael Zimecki. - Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can provide podcast transcripts. Thanks! :) This week, the Crime Cafe presents Debbi Mack's interview with crime author Michael Zimecki.<br /> <br /> Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can provide podcast transcripts. Thanks! :) Debbi Mack clean 20:48 Interview with Crime Thriller Author Elka Ray – S. 4, Ep. 6 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-6-crime-talk-with-author-elka-ray/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-6-crime-talk-with-author-elka-ray Sun, 16 Sep 2018 04:08:15 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17313 This week, the Crime Cafe presents Debbi Mack's interview with crime thriller author Elka Ray. Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can provide podcast transcripts. Thanks! :) This week, the Crime Cafe presents Debbi Mack's interview with crime thriller author Elka Ray. - Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can provide podcast transcripts. Thanks! :) This week, the Crime Cafe presents Debbi Mack's interview with crime thriller author Elka Ray.<br /> <br /> Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can provide podcast transcripts. Thanks! :) Debbi Mack clean 16:01 Interview with Thriller Author Jame DiBiasio – S. 4, Ep. 5 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-5-chat-thriller-author-jame-dibiasio/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-5-chat-thriller-author-jame-dibiasio Sun, 02 Sep 2018 04:05:46 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17269 Author Debbi Mack interviews thriller author Jame DiBiasio on the Crime Cafe podcast. Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can provide podcast transcripts. Thanks! :) Supporters get access to free books and stories, including my first novel, Identity Crisis, Donna Fletcher Crow's novel, A Very Private Grave, my short story "Jasmine", and advance looks at the third Sam McRae novel and my next release featuring a new protagonist. Along with all the perks you get as a supporter. So check it out! :) Author Debbi Mack interviews thriller author Jame DiBiasio on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can provide podcast transcripts. Thanks! :) - Supporters get access to free books and stories, Author Debbi Mack interviews thriller author Jame DiBiasio on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can provide podcast transcripts. Thanks! :)<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Supporters get access to free books and stories, including my first novel, Identity Crisis, Donna Fletcher Crow's novel, A Very Private Grave, my short story "Jasmine", and advance looks at the third Sam McRae novel and my next release featuring a new protagonist. Along with all the perks you get as a supporter.<br /> <br /> So check it out! :) Debbi Mack clean 20:11 Philip Marlowe Episode, ‘The Persian Slippers’ – S. 4, Ep. 4 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-4-philip-marlowe-episode-persian-slippers/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-4-philip-marlowe-episode-persian-slippers Sun, 19 Aug 2018 04:05:11 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17211 Instead of the usual interview, this episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode “The Persian Slippers”. I hope you enjoy the show! :) Coming soon! A sneak peek at my upcoming novel for Patreon supporters! Instead of the usual interview, this episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode “The Persian Slippers”. - I hope you enjoy the show! :) - Coming soon! A sneak peek at my upcoming novel for Patreon supporters! Instead of the usual interview, this episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode “The Persian Slippers”.<br /> <br /> I hope you enjoy the show! :)<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Coming soon! A sneak peek at my upcoming novel for Patreon supporters! Debbi Mack clean 29:17 Interview with Crime Fiction and Noir Author Jason Michel – S. 4, Ep. 3 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-3-chat-crime-noir-author-jason-michel/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-3-chat-crime-noir-author-jason-michel Sun, 05 Aug 2018 04:05:36 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17080 Author Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction and noir author Jason Michel on the Crime Cafe podcast. Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can continue to provide podcast transcripts. Thank you! :) Author Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction and noir author Jason Michel on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can continue to provide podcast transcripts. Thank you! :) Author Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction and noir author Jason Michel on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter so we can continue to provide podcast transcripts. Thank you! :) Debbi Mack clean 27:08 Interview with Crime Fiction Author Phillip Thompson – S. 4, Ep. 2 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-2-chat-crime-fiction-author-phillip-thompson/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-2-chat-crime-fiction-author-phillip-thompson Sun, 22 Jul 2018 04:05:49 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=17013 Author Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction author Phillip Thompson on the Crime Cafe podcast. To buy any of the booka displayed below, just click on the cover. The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. Or download the PDF copy and read it later. Debbi: Hello everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack and before I bring on my guest, may I remind you—like you have a choice—that The Crime Cafe 9 Book Set and Crime Cafe Short Story Anthology are available for sale on Amazon, Barnes & Nobel, Kobo, Apple, etc. You can find the buy links on my website, debbimack.com and also we have a Patreon campaign. If you make a $5 monthly donation, you will get access to a lot of really great content; short stories and, for an addition $5 per month, get a free copy of our Crime Cafe 9 Book Set. That’s nine novels for free. So, consider it please and you’ll get our endless gratitude as well. Okay, having said that, it’s my pleasure to introduce my guest, a Mississippi native, a Marine, a journalist and speech writer, as well as the author of four novels, Phillip Thompson. Hi Phillip, it’s great to have you on. Thanks for being here. Phillip: Hi, Debbi. Thanks for inviting me. Debbi: Sure thing! There is so much I could ask you, because you’ve done so many fascinating things, but let’s talk about your crime writing. Phillip: Okay. Debbi: Your first novel was, Enemy Within. Tell us about the story and that protagonist. Phillip: Sure. That novel seems completely old now. I wrote it in the late 90’s and the protagonist is an ATF Agent named Wade Stuart, who’s investigating a white militia who is plotting to overthrow the governor of the state of Mississippi and also has a gun smuggling operation going. And Stuart who is investigating this kind of runs into a moral dilemma, but he starts to challenge his own thinking about the government that he works for, the government that he served and how that clashes with individual freedoms. And when I wrote it at the time, it was precipitated by something, an incident that I ran across on active duty and it made me start to think about, you know, what would really happen if Americans were confronted with individual freedoms, especially with gun rights? And this goes back, you know, 20 years. Back then it sort of seemed implausible if you will, but 20 years later it seems a little bit more relevant now than it did even back then. Debbi: Yes, absolutely. It seems like a very timely issue. Phillip: I thought it was then. It wasn’t so much then, but I think, you know years later… Debbi: You were ahead of your time [laughs]. Phillip: Apparently it was, yeah. Debbi: Well, I think that’s a very intriguing premise and I actually bought a copy of the story. Phillip: Oh, okay. Debbi: So, I’m looking forward to reading it. Phillip: Thanks. Debbi: Definitely. On your blog you mention you’ve tried to turn it into a screenplay, or did you turn it into a screenplay? Phillip: Well, I have a draft. I’m not necessarily a screenwriter. I did teach myself how to write screenplays a few years ago and I had this grand idea, oh, I’ll just turn my first novel into a screenplay, which is a lot, lot harder than it sounds. It’s a completely different form; screenwriting is. You’ve got 120 pages and you have to…there are rules that you need to comply with. So, I have a draft, but it’s very rough, and I don’t think it’s quite ready for prime time yet. Debbi: My sympathies are with you. I know what it’s like to try to adapt one’s own novel because I’ve done it. Phillip: Right, you’re a screenwriter yourself. Debbi: It’s very, very tough, and I didn’t think I was going to be able to do it actually. The person who asked me, the producer said, I think you can. Go right ahead and I’m like okay [laughs]. It’s tough, it’s really, really tough. Author Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction author Phillip Thompson on the Crime Cafe podcast. - To buy any of the booka displayed below, just click on the cover. - The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. - Author Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction author Phillip Thompson on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> To buy any of the booka displayed below, just click on the cover.<br /> <br /> The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it.<br /> <br /> Or download the PDF copy and read it later.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hello everyone. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense, and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack and before I bring on my guest, may I remind you—like you have a choice—that The Crime Cafe 9 Book Set and Crime Cafe Short Story Anthology are available for sale on Amazon, Barnes & Nobel, Kobo, Apple, etc. You can find the buy links on my website, debbimack.com and also we have a Patreon campaign. If you make a $5 monthly donation, you will get access to a lot of really great content; short stories and, for an addition $5 per month, get a free copy of our Crime Cafe 9 Book Set. That’s nine novels for free. So, consider it please and you’ll get our endless gratitude as well. Okay, having said that, it’s my pleasure to introduce my guest, a Mississippi native, a Marine, a journalist and speech writer, as well as the author of four novels, Phillip Thompson. Hi Phillip, it’s great to have you on. Thanks for being here.<br /> <br /> Phillip: Hi, Debbi. Thanks for inviting me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Sure thing! There is so much I could ask you, because you’ve done so many fascinating things, but let’s talk about your crime writing.<br /> <br /> Phillip: Okay.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Your first novel was, Enemy Within. Tell us about the story and that protagonist.<br /> <br /> Phillip: Sure. That novel seems completely old now. I wrote it in the late 90’s and the protagonist is an ATF Agent named Wade Stuart, who’s investigating a white militia who is plotting to overthrow the governor of the state of Mississippi and also has a gun smuggling operation going. And Stuart who is investigating this kind of runs into a moral dilemma, but he starts to challenge his own thinking about the government that he works for, the government that he served and how that clashes with individual freedoms. And when I wrote it at the time, it was precipitated by something, an incident that I ran across on active duty and it made me start to think about, you know, what would really happen if Americans were confronted with individual freedoms, especially with gun rights? And this goes back, you know, 20 years. Back then it sort of seemed implausible if you will, but 20 years later it seems a little bit more relevant now than it did even back then.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yes, absolutely. It seems like a very timely issue.<br /> <br /> Phillip: I thought it was then. It wasn’t so much then, but I think, you know years later…<br /> <br /> Debbi: You were ahead of your time [laughs].<br /> <br /> Phillip: Apparently it was, yeah.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Well, I think that’s a very intriguing premise and I actually bought a copy of the story.<br /> <br /> Phillip: Oh, okay.<br /> <br /> Debbi: So, I’m looking forward to reading it.<br /> <br /> Phillip: Thanks.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Definitely. On your blog you mention you’ve tried to turn it into a screenplay, or did you turn it into a screenplay?<br /> <br /> Phillip: Well, I have a draft. I’m not necessarily a screenwriter. I did teach myself how to write screenplays a few years ago and I had this grand idea, oh, I’ll just turn my first novel into a screenplay, which is a lot, lot harder than it sounds. It’s a completely different form; screenwriting is. You’ve got 120 pages and you have to…there are rules that you need to comply with. So, I have a draft, but it’s very rough, and I don’t think it’s quite ready for prime time yet.<br /> <br /> Debbi: My sympathies are with you. I know what it’s like to try to adapt one’s own novel because I’ve done it.<br /> <br /> Phillip: Right, Debbi Mack clean 22:54 Interview with Mystery Author Daniella Bernett – S. 4, Ep. 1 https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-4-ep-1-chat-mystery-author-daniella-bernett/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-4-ep-1-chat-mystery-author-daniella-bernett Sun, 08 Jul 2018 04:05:09 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=16947 Author Debbi Mack interviews mystery author Daniella Bernett on the Crime Cafe podcast. To buy the book displayed below, just click on the cover. The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. Or download the PDF copy and read it later. Debbi: Hello everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. It’s a real thrill to be back for a fourth season of this podcast and before I get into introducing my guest, I would like to say two things. We have The Crime Cafe publications on sale on my website, debbimack.com under "Crime Cafe". You can find them at any retailer, online and if you happen to catch this podcast during July of 2018, they’re going for a special price on Smashwords. I mean a really low price, so check it out. And the second thing I wanted to say is we now have a Patreon page. If you want to support the podcast, there are all sorts of cool perks that go along with being a supporter, like early looks at novels and drafts and free short stories, video chats, that kind of thing. So, there is a lot there for people who support the podcast, including a free copy of the 9 book set if you support at the $10 or above level. So, having said that, let’s get to the podcast. Let’s get to our guest, our distinguished guest who is back for a second time; a return visit from Daniella Burnett who writes the Emmeline Kirby/Gregory Longdon series, mystery series. Welcome, Daniella. It’s great to have you back. Daniella: Thank you very much. I’m glad to be here again. Debbi: It’s wonderful to be here for a fourth season and to have you as well. Daniella: Yes, your program is so delightful and you give so many people an opportunity to hear about different authors and their mysteries. Debbi: I do my best [laughs]. Daniella: [laughs] Debbi: Right now you have a third book out. Is that correct? And you’re working on the fourth one and getting it published. Daniella: Actually the third book is out. The fourth book, The Checkered Past will be released on September 29th, and I’m actually working on Book Six at the moment. Debbi: Okay, yeah. Of course, we’re always working on the book that’s way ahead of what’s being published [laughs]. Or, you know, yeah. But, so everything always feels a little out of whack timewise [laughs]. Daniella: Yes, it does a little. Debbi: But, in any case, tell us a little bit about Book Three because I noticed that it gets into some dark secrets, as far as Gregory is concerned and Emmeline’s relationship with him. Daniella: Okay, well Book Three was, From Beyond The Grave, which took place in Torquay along the English Riviera in Devon. There’s a change in dynamic in Emmeline and Gregory’s relationship so that’s why I decided to take them out of their usual environment, which is in London so that we could focus more on their relationship and the change in dynamic of it and as you mentioned, in that book Gregory has always had secrets but his secrets are taking a different turn and are impacting the dynamic of their relationship. Debbi: Yes! And there’s a kind of a love triangle of sorts. Daniella: Yes there is a woman from his past that causes conflicts and a lot of grief for Emmeline in, From Beyond The Grave. Debbi: So that sounds intriguing and it ends up extending to a certain extent into Book Four. Daniella: Yes, it does because I am leaving something hanging at the end there to intrigue my readers and make them want to go to four, which will be coming out in September. Debbi: Yes! Daniella: Certain questions are answered in Book Four, but more questions linger. Debbi: My goodness! One of the things I was wondering, in Book Four you get into the very interesting subject of Nazi-looted art. Daniella: Yes, I do. Book Four focuses on a looted Nazi painting and a former IRA Commander because as I was developing the story line for my book, Author Debbi Mack interviews mystery author Daniella Bernett on the Crime Cafe podcast. - To buy the book displayed below, just click on the cover. - The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. - Author Debbi Mack interviews mystery author Daniella Bernett on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> To buy the book displayed below, just click on the cover.<br /> <br /> The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it.<br /> <br /> Or download the PDF copy and read it later.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Hello everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. It’s a real thrill to be back for a fourth season of this podcast and before I get into introducing my guest, I would like to say two things. We have The Crime Cafe publications on sale on my website, debbimack.com under "Crime Cafe". You can find them at any retailer, online and if you happen to catch this podcast during July of 2018, they’re going for a special price on Smashwords. I mean a really low price, so check it out. And the second thing I wanted to say is we now have a Patreon page. If you want to support the podcast, there are all sorts of cool perks that go along with being a supporter, like early looks at novels and drafts and free short stories, video chats, that kind of thing. So, there is a lot there for people who support the podcast, including a free copy of the 9 book set if you support at the $10 or above level. So, having said that, let’s get to the podcast. Let’s get to our guest, our distinguished guest who is back for a second time; a return visit from Daniella Burnett who writes the Emmeline Kirby/Gregory Longdon series, mystery series. Welcome, Daniella. It’s great to have you back.<br /> <br /> Daniella: Thank you very much. I’m glad to be here again.<br /> <br /> Debbi: It’s wonderful to be here for a fourth season and to have you as well.<br /> <br /> Daniella: Yes, your program is so delightful and you give so many people an opportunity to hear about different authors and their mysteries.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I do my best [laughs].<br /> <br /> Daniella: [laughs]<br /> <br /> Debbi: Right now you have a third book out. Is that correct? And you’re working on the fourth one and getting it published.<br /> <br /> Daniella: Actually the third book is out. The fourth book, The Checkered Past will be released on September 29th, and I’m actually working on Book Six at the moment.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Okay, yeah. Of course, we’re always working on the book that’s way ahead of what’s being published [laughs]. Or, you know, yeah. But, so everything always feels a little out of whack timewise [laughs].<br /> <br /> Daniella: Yes, it does a little.<br /> <br /> Debbi: But, in any case, tell us a little bit about Book Three because I noticed that it gets into some dark secrets, as far as Gregory is concerned and Emmeline’s relationship with him.<br /> <br /> Daniella: Okay, well Book Three was, From Beyond The Grave, which took place in Torquay along the English Riviera in Devon. There’s a change in dynamic in Emmeline and Gregory’s relationship so that’s why I decided to take them out of their usual environment, which is in London so that we could focus more on their relationship and the change in dynamic of it and as you mentioned, in that book Gregory has always had secrets but his secrets are taking a different turn and are impacting the dynamic of their relationship.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yes! And there’s a kind of a love triangle of sorts.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Daniella: Yes there is a woman from his past that causes conflicts and a lot of grief for Emmeline in, From Beyond The Grave.<br /> <br /> Debbi: So that sounds intriguing and it ends up extending to a certain extent into Book Four.<br /> <br /> Daniella: Yes, it does because I am leaving something hanging at the end there to intrigue my readers and make them want to go to four, which will be coming out in September.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yes!<br /> <br /> Daniella: Certain questions are answered in Book Four, but more questions linger.<br /> Debbi Mack clean 19:15 S. 3, Ep. 22: A Chat with Crime Fiction Author David Swinson https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-3-ep-22-a-chat-with-crime-fiction-author-david-swinson/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-3-ep-22-a-chat-with-crime-fiction-author-david-swinson Sun, 22 Apr 2018 04:05:46 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=16745 Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction author David Swinson. To buy any of the books displayed, just click on the cover. The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. Or download the PDF copy and read it later. Debbi: Hi! This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. Before I introduce our guest, I’d like to remind you to check out the Crime Cafe story collections; a boxed set and a short story anthology. They’re on my website, debbimack.com. Just click on the link “Crime Cafe” and you can get to the buy buttons there, as well as see our merchandise and other stuff that’s cool, and subscribe buttons, of course, to the podcast. Also, get ready for our Patreon launch. I’m setting up an online community for supporters of the Crime Cafe and there will be great perks for anybody who contributes and exclusive content if you contribute at a certain level. It’s not a very high level, either. So, it’s monthly contributions and I would greatly appreciate your support for that. When that comes out, I’ll let you know. In any case, without further ado, I would like to introduce my distinguished guest… David: Oh geez! Debbi: A really great author who writes wonderful crime fiction, David Swinson. David: Hi! Debbi: Hi, David. How’s it going? David: Good, good. Debbi: Excellent. I met you online after reading, The Second Girl. I found a review, I can’t remember where it was, but somewhere or other a review popped up for, The Second Girl and I was just captivated by it. Not only because it’s set in D.C., which is, you know, I live near D.C., arguably Columbia is a suburb of D.C. David: Fairfax Station. Debbi: Yeah, but it was just such a wonderful story with a great protagonist. David: Thank you. Debbi: Now reading Crime Song, which is a stunning and wonderful follow up. It’s excellent and I would like you to tell us more about Frank Marr and the series and how and why you developed this character. David: Well, Frank Marr … I think The Second Girl was published in May of 2016 and then Crime Song, June of 2017 and then the third book is not coming out until February 2019. But prior to 2016, I mean Frank Marr was in my head seriously for years, I mean a long time. And I had written a couple of other books prior to The Second Girl and they got rejected and they were police procedurals and then I went back to Frank and said, listen I’m just going to have fun. I’m going to do something that’s so outside of me, and Frank Marr is totally outside of me. I mean, in certain ways I’d love to be like him. In certain ways I would not want to be like him at all. But nothing bothers him or affects him, I mean as far as like his habit and stuff like that. It’s like he’s almost blind to that kind of stuff. But I just sat down and had fun and wrote it, and when I gave it to my agent with the other two books I had written, she goes, “Are you sure you’re done?” You know? And that’s sort of like an indication, well, maybe I better go…but on this one she didn’t say that. She just said, this is good and she did not send it out wide, she only sent…I wanted her to send it to an editor who had turned me down like two times, Josh Kendall at Little Brown in Mulholland and he ended up falling in love with it. But Frank…before Frank was a retired cop turned PI, he was an actual burglar. Not a cop, just a regular burglar that got involved in some PI work. But he was also a burglar and that’s what, you know got him his money and stuff like that. But Frank Marr, he ended up changing and I made him a retired cop turned PI. It also used to take place in 1999, because that’s really when MS-13 was really active with trying to recruit young girls and stuff like that in high schools and I agreed with my editor. I mean 1999…I wanted to really get away from all the social media, because I can’t stand having to write about that stuff. Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction author David Swinson. - To buy any of the books displayed, just click on the cover. - The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. - Or download the PDF copy and read it later. - Debbi: Hi! Debbi Mack interviews crime fiction author David Swinson.<br /> <br /> To buy any of the books displayed, just click on the cover.<br /> <br /> The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it.<br /> <br /> Or download the PDF copy and read it later.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi! This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. Before I introduce our guest, I’d like to remind you to check out the Crime Cafe story collections; a boxed set and a short story anthology. They’re on my website, debbimack.com. Just click on the link “Crime Cafe” and you can get to the buy buttons there, as well as see our merchandise and other stuff that’s cool, and subscribe buttons, of course, to the podcast. Also, get ready for our Patreon launch. I’m setting up an online community for supporters of the Crime Cafe and there will be great perks for anybody who contributes and exclusive content if you contribute at a certain level. It’s not a very high level, either. So, it’s monthly contributions and I would greatly appreciate your support for that. When that comes out, I’ll let you know. In any case, without further ado, I would like to introduce my distinguished guest…<br /> <br /> David: Oh geez!<br /> <br /> Debbi: A really great author who writes wonderful crime fiction, David Swinson.<br /> <br /> David: Hi!<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, David. How’s it going?<br /> <br /> David: Good, good.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Excellent. I met you online after reading, The Second Girl. I found a review, I can’t remember where it was, but somewhere or other a review popped up for, The Second Girl and I was just captivated by it. Not only because it’s set in D.C., which is, you know, I live near D.C., arguably Columbia is a suburb of D.C.<br /> <br /> David: Fairfax Station.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yeah, but it was just such a wonderful story with a great protagonist.<br /> <br /> David: Thank you.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Now reading Crime Song, which is a stunning and wonderful follow up. It’s excellent and I would like you to tell us more about Frank Marr and the series and how and why you developed this character.<br /> <br /> David: Well, Frank Marr … I think The Second Girl was published in May of 2016 and then Crime Song, June of 2017 and then the third book is not coming out until February 2019. But prior to 2016, I mean Frank Marr was in my head seriously for years, I mean a long time. And I had written a couple of other books prior to The Second Girl and they got rejected and they were police procedurals and then I went back to Frank and said, listen I’m just going to have fun. I’m going to do something that’s so outside of me, and Frank Marr is totally outside of me. I mean, in certain ways I’d love to be like him. In certain ways I would not want to be like him at all. But nothing bothers him or affects him, I mean as far as like his habit and stuff like that. It’s like he’s almost blind to that kind of stuff.<br /> <br /> But I just sat down and had fun and wrote it, and when I gave it to my agent with the other two books I had written, she goes, “Are you sure you’re done?” You know? And that’s sort of like an indication, well, maybe I better go…but on this one she didn’t say that. She just said, this is good and she did not send it out wide, she only sent…I wanted her to send it to an editor who had turned me down like two times, Josh Kendall at Little Brown in Mulholland and he ended up falling in love with it. But Frank…before Frank was a retired cop turned PI, he was an actual burglar. Not a cop, just a regular burglar that got involved in some PI work. But he was also a burglar and that’s what, you know got him his money and stuff like that.<br /> <br /> But Frank Marr, he ended up changing and I made him a retired cop turned PI. It also used to take place in 1999, because that’s really when MS-13 was really active with trying to recruit yo... Debbi Mack clean 32:28 S. 3, Ep. 21: Philip Marlowe Episode, “Trouble is My Business” https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-3-ep-21-philip-marlowe-episode-trouble-business/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-3-ep-21-philip-marlowe-episode-trouble-business Sun, 15 Apr 2018 04:05:57 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=16711 Instead of the usual interview, this episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode "Trouble is My Business". Instead of the usual interview, this episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode "Trouble is My Business". Instead of the usual interview, this episode of the Crime Cafe features the Philip Marlowe radio episode "Trouble is My Business". Debbi Mack clean 27:04 S. 3, Ep. 20: A Chat with Crime Fiction Publisher Anne Trager https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-3-ep-20-chat-crime-fiction-publisher-anne-trager/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-3-ep-20-chat-crime-fiction-publisher-anne-trager Sun, 01 Apr 2018 04:05:52 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=16653 Debbi Mack interviews translator and crime fiction publisher Anne Trager. To buy Minced, Marinated, and Murdered, just click on the cover below. The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. Or download the PDF copy and read it later. Debbi: Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I introduce my guest, I’ll remind you to check out the Crime Cafe boxed set and anthology on my website. Just go to debbimack.com and click on the “Crime Cafe” link and you can find the buy buttons for both books and download them there. They’re sold at a very reasonable price and you can also find the podcast subscription buttons there and the Crime Cafe merchandise, so check it out. And now, it’s my great pleasure to bring on translator and crime fiction publisher, from France (living in France at any rate) Anne Trager. Hi Anne! It’s so great to have you on. Thanks for being here. Anne: Hi Debbi! I am thrilled to be here. Thanks so much for having me. Debbi: Well, I am very happy to have you. Let’s talk about Le French Book. Le French Book, is that correct? Anne: That’s correct, that’s correct. Debbi: Le French Book. Tell us about how you went to translating for others to founding a publishing company. Anne: Well, so it happened in 2012. I was working…I had been living in France for a really, really long time. I moved over here in 1985 just because I was obsessed with France and so I ended up in France and then I just stayed and I worked as a translator for a really long time. I worked in publishing in France and I worked in international communications for international companies here, well, in Paris at the time when I was living in Paris. And one morning, I just woke up and I said, you know I’ve got to do something here. I am reading these fantastic French writers in French. I love mysteries and thrillers and they just weren’t being translated into English. Now some were, but very, very few. I mean at the time there were only … like three percent of the books published in the United States were translations and that’s all languages together. So, imagine the tiny, tiny percentage of French books that were actually getting into English. This is still the case, actually. I mean we can only do much, but we do what we can, right? And it was really frustrating because I’d read these authors and I couldn’t talk to them to my friend and I couldn’t share them with the people I wanted to share them with, you know? And I said, actually I can do this. I have a foot in the U.S. because I’m American and that’s where I grew up and that’s my culture and I have a foot in France because that’s where I’m living and I speak French and I translate and I know about publishing. So, there you go. That’s how we started Le French Book. Debbi: That’s fantastic! How many titles do you publish a year? Anne: Well, it’s really variable. I mean I wish we could do more. So far we’ve published about 30 titles and it goes up and down, and we’ve had years where we’ve published more and years when we’ve published fewer, you know depending on any number of factors including the fact that translation takes a really long time and you know you need to spend time translating books. Debbi: Yes. I was going to ask who your favorite crime fiction authors, French or otherwise are? Anne: Oh, you know, that’s a really, really hard question. I mean we have published 30 titles. That’s not 30 different authors because we have some series, but I have a bunch of authors and in our…you know we publish a bunch of different authors and I’m very involved in each one of those books. And you really, really have to love a book to want to translate it because it requires actually getting into an author’s head, you know. Understanding who they are, where they’re coming from, what they’re trying to get across; getting into the story and building a br... Debbi Mack interviews translator and crime fiction publisher Anne Trager. - To buy Minced, Marinated, and Murdered, just click on the cover below. - The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. - Debbi Mack interviews translator and crime fiction publisher Anne Trager.<br /> <br /> To buy Minced, Marinated, and Murdered, just click on the cover below.<br /> <br /> The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it.<br /> <br /> Or download the PDF copy and read it later.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I introduce my guest, I’ll remind you to check out the Crime Cafe boxed set and anthology on my website. Just go to debbimack.com and click on the “Crime Cafe” link and you can find the buy buttons for both books and download them there. They’re sold at a very reasonable price and you can also find the podcast subscription buttons there and the Crime Cafe merchandise, so check it out. And now, it’s my great pleasure to bring on translator and crime fiction publisher, from France (living in France at any rate) Anne Trager. Hi Anne! It’s so great to have you on. Thanks for being here.<br /> <br /> Anne: Hi Debbi! I am thrilled to be here. Thanks so much for having me.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Well, I am very happy to have you. Let’s talk about Le French Book. Le French Book, is that correct?<br /> <br /> Anne: That’s correct, that’s correct.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Le French Book. Tell us about how you went to translating for others to founding a publishing company.<br /> <br /> Anne: Well, so it happened in 2012. I was working…I had been living in France for a really, really long time. I moved over here in 1985 just because I was obsessed with France and so I ended up in France and then I just stayed and I worked as a translator for a really long time. I worked in publishing in France and I worked in international communications for international companies here, well, in Paris at the time when I was living in Paris. And one morning, I just woke up and I said, you know I’ve got to do something here. I am reading these fantastic French writers in French. I love mysteries and thrillers and they just weren’t being translated into English.<br /> <br /> Now some were, but very, very few. I mean at the time there were only … like three percent of the books published in the United States were translations and that’s all languages together. So, imagine the tiny, tiny percentage of French books that were actually getting into English. This is still the case, actually. I mean we can only do much, but we do what we can, right? And it was really frustrating because I’d read these authors and I couldn’t talk to them to my friend and I couldn’t share them with the people I wanted to share them with, you know? And I said, actually I can do this. I have a foot in the U.S. because I’m American and that’s where I grew up and that’s my culture and I have a foot in France because that’s where I’m living and I speak French and I translate and I know about publishing. So, there you go. That’s how we started Le French Book.<br /> <br /> Debbi: That’s fantastic! How many titles do you publish a year?<br /> <br /> Anne: Well, it’s really variable. I mean I wish we could do more. So far we’ve published about 30 titles and it goes up and down, and we’ve had years where we’ve published more and years when we’ve published fewer, you know depending on any number of factors including the fact that translation takes a really long time and you know you need to spend time translating books.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yes. I was going to ask who your favorite crime fiction authors, French or otherwise are?<br /> <br /> Anne: Oh, you know, that’s a really, really hard question. I mean we have published 30 titles. That’s not 30 different authors because we have some series, but I have a bunch of authors and in our…you know we publish a bunch of different authors and I’m very involved in each one of those books. And you really, really have to love a book to want to translate it because it requires actually get... Debbi Mack clean 26:02 S. 3, Ep. 19: Debbi Mack Reads Chapter Seven of ‘Identity Crisis’ https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-3-ep-19-debbi-mack-reads-chapter-seven-identity-crisis/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-3-ep-19-debbi-mack-reads-chapter-seven-identity-crisis Sun, 18 Mar 2018 04:05:42 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=16586 Debbi Mack reads Chapter 7 of her New York Times bestselling hardboiled mystery, Identity Crisis, on the Crime Cafe podcast. Here's the text of the reading: CHAPTER SEVEN By the time I recovered my wind, they’d gagged me and tied my hands behind my back. The rope was tight, making my wrists hurt. Having my arms stretched back was awkward, forcing me to use muscles I’d not used in ages. The car’s air conditioning was on full blast. I was freezing and sweating like a pig. On the whole, it was not an ideal arrangement. They took me somewhere. I can’t tell you where. I can’t even tell you how long it took. A blindfold takes away all sense of place and time. Being terrified doesn’t make things much better. When we finally got to wherever the hell we went, they guided me out of the car with hands gripping both my arms. We marched a few yards, then stopped. I heard the jingle of keys. No one spoke. A door opened and we went inside. The floor was hard and the only sound was the faint echo of our footsteps. We walked until we reached another door. More walking, then up a short flight of steps. Despite my fear, I was amazed at how well my other senses worked, taking up the slack caused by the blindfold. First, a hard floor, then a carpet, now bare floor again. The place felt warm and stuffy, but maybe I was just nervous. The guys holding my arms were firm, but not rough. Not gentle either, but they had no reason to be rough—yet. They maneuvered me around until I felt something against the back of my knees. One of the men grunted something like “siddown” in my ear. I complied with gratitude. My legs shook. Sweat dripped from my armpits and my stomach was jumpy. I desperately hoped I wouldn’t vomit—especially with the gag on. They bound my legs and took off the blindfold and gag. I was on a stage, facing a dark theater, squinting into two blinding white spotlights. When my eyes adjusted, I could see empty seats. What had I expected, a full house? “Ms. McRae.” A disembodied male voice, electrically amplified, boomed from the dark. I blinked and waited for more. “Ms. McRae,” the voice repeated in an implacable and monotonous tone. “It’s good to meet you.” I didn’t trust myself to say anything, so I nodded. “I’m sorry about the inconvenience. It’s important you know we’re serious.” No shit, I thought. I licked my lips, but my mouth had gone so dry it was a wasted gesture. “You do realize that?” I worked my mouth again and managed to say, “Yes.” It sounded like I’d swallowed ground glass. “Good. Let’s get down to business then,” the robotic voice droned on. “It would be good to do this quickly and painlessly, don’t you agree?” He could have been talking about killing me, for all I knew. I said, “Yes.” “Where is Melanie Hayes, Ms. McRae?” “I don’t know.” “What was that?” “I don’t know.” In my peripheral vision, I sensed a presence. A big, heavy, muscle-bound presence. “Is that your final answer?” Had I been kidnapped by Regis Philbin? “I just don’t—” Suddenly, I was facing left, my cheek stinging, but I hadn’t turned my head—someone had turned it for me. The slap had come fast and from out of nowhere. “Where is she?” I tried to catch my breath. “I … don’t know.” Another slap, harder this time. The lights were making my eyes hurt. My head throbbed. “Where is Melanie Hayes?” Again, I told him I didn’t know. I got a punch in the ribs. Then another. “Where is she?” I shook my head. It hurt to breathe now. Another hard slap followed by a punch in the gut. I gasped for air. “Stop that,” the voice commanded. “Give her time.” The muscle man stepped back. I got my time. Then the voice said, “What’s your business with Bruce Schaeffer?” How the hell had Schaeffer gotten into this? “Wanted to ask him some questions.” “About what? What sort of questions?” “Thought maybe he might know where Melanie is.” Pause. “I’m not sure I believe you.” Debbi Mack reads Chapter 7 of her New York Times bestselling hardboiled mystery, Identity Crisis, on the Crime Cafe podcast. - Here's the text of the reading: CHAPTER SEVEN By the time I recovered my wind, Debbi Mack reads Chapter 7 of her New York Times bestselling hardboiled mystery, Identity Crisis, on the Crime Cafe podcast.<br /> <br /> Here's the text of the reading:<br /> <br /> <br /> CHAPTER SEVEN<br /> By the time I recovered my wind, they’d gagged me and tied my hands behind my back. The rope was tight, making my wrists hurt. Having my arms stretched back was awkward, forcing me to use muscles I’d not used in ages. The car’s air conditioning was on full blast. I was freezing and sweating like a pig. On the whole, it was not an ideal arrangement.<br /> They took me somewhere. I can’t tell you where. I can’t even tell you how long it took. A blindfold takes away all sense of place and time. Being terrified doesn’t make things much better.<br /> <br /> When we finally got to wherever the hell we went, they guided me out of the car with hands gripping both my arms. We marched a few yards, then stopped. I heard the jingle of keys. No one spoke.<br /> <br /> A door opened and we went inside. The floor was hard and the only sound was the faint echo of our footsteps. We walked until we reached another door. More walking, then up a short flight of steps. Despite my fear, I was amazed at how well my other senses worked, taking up the slack caused by the blindfold. First, a hard floor, then a carpet, now bare floor again. The place felt warm and stuffy, but maybe I was just nervous. The guys holding my arms were firm, but not rough. Not gentle either, but they had no reason to be rough—yet.<br /> <br /> They maneuvered me around until I felt something against the back of my knees. One of the men grunted something like “siddown” in my ear. I complied with gratitude. My legs shook. Sweat dripped from my armpits and my stomach was jumpy. I desperately hoped I wouldn’t vomit—especially with the gag on.<br /> <br /> They bound my legs and took off the blindfold and gag. I was on a stage, facing a dark theater, squinting into two blinding white spotlights. When my eyes adjusted, I could see empty seats. What had I expected, a full house?<br /> <br /> “Ms. McRae.” A disembodied male voice, electrically amplified, boomed from the dark.<br /> <br /> I blinked and waited for more.<br /> <br /> “Ms. McRae,” the voice repeated in an implacable and monotonous tone. “It’s good to meet you.”<br /> <br /> I didn’t trust myself to say anything, so I nodded.<br /> <br /> “I’m sorry about the inconvenience. It’s important you know we’re serious.”<br /> <br /> No shit, I thought. I licked my lips, but my mouth had gone so dry it was a wasted gesture.<br /> <br /> “You do realize that?”<br /> <br /> I worked my mouth again and managed to say, “Yes.” It sounded like I’d swallowed ground glass.<br /> <br /> “Good. Let’s get down to business then,” the robotic voice droned on. “It would be good to do this quickly and painlessly, don’t you agree?”<br /> <br /> He could have been talking about killing me, for all I knew. I said, “Yes.”<br /> <br /> “Where is Melanie Hayes, Ms. McRae?”<br /> <br /> “I don’t know.”<br /> <br /> “What was that?”<br /> <br /> “I don’t know.” In my peripheral vision, I sensed a presence. A big, heavy, muscle-bound presence.<br /> <br /> “Is that your final answer?”<br /> <br /> Had I been kidnapped by Regis Philbin? “I just don’t—”<br /> <br /> Suddenly, I was facing left, my cheek stinging, but I hadn’t turned my head—someone had turned it for me. The slap had come fast and from out of nowhere.<br /> <br /> “Where is she?”<br /> <br /> I tried to catch my breath. “I … don’t know.”<br /> <br /> Another slap, harder this time. The lights were making my eyes hurt. My head throbbed.<br /> <br /> “Where is Melanie Hayes?”<br /> <br /> Again, I told him I didn’t know. I got a punch in the ribs. Then another.<br /> <br /> “Where is she?”<br /> <br /> I shook my head. It hurt to breathe now. Another hard slap followed by a punch in the gut. I gasped for air.<br /> Debbi Mack clean 14:27 S. 3, Ep. 18: A Chat with Mystery Author Richard Helms https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-3-ep-18-chat-mystery-author-richard-helms/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-3-ep-18-chat-mystery-author-richard-helms Sun, 04 Mar 2018 05:05:03 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=16509 Debbi Mack interviews mystery author Richard Helms. To buy any of the books displayed, just click on the cover. The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. Or download the PDF copy and read it later. Debbi: Hi everybody. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I introduce my guest, I’d like to remind you to please check out the Crime Cafe Nine Book Set and the Crime Cafe Short Story Anthology. Both publications you can find on my website, debbimack.com when you click on the link Crime Cafe. You can also find the podcast subscription buttons there, as well as Crime Cafe merch. And with that, I would like to introduce my good friend and a great writer who also happens to be a multi-award winning author, a retired clinical forensic psychologist, and a retired college professor, Richard Helms. Do you go by Rick or Richard? Richard: I go by Rick. Debbi: Yes, I always call you Rick [laughs]. So, very cool, Rick. Thanks for being here. I’m so glad you could be here. Richard: Well, I’m happy to be here. I appreciate you having me today. Debbi: Well, it’s my pleasure and at this point, you said you have 19 published novels? Richard: Well, yeah. I have 19 that have been published. I think three of them are still in print. So, a bunch of them are available as ebooks, but most of my novels right now are out-of-print for any of a number of reasons. My own publishing company folded up back in 2011 and several of the books were on that, and Five Star (I’m one of the Five Star orphans). Some of you may not be familiar with Five Star. It was a division of Cengage Learning, which used to be Houghton Mifflin. It was Thomson-Shore and all these other, but anyway, they folded their mystery thriller line, I guess January of 2015 and I got the message on my birthday that my book publisher was going out of business. Not only that, but my books were going to be going out of print. So, the books that I had with Five Star are largely out-of-print at this point, but I have had 19 published up to this point beginning all the way back in 1980, which is probably before a lot of people watching this were born, when I had my first couple of novels published by World Karting Magazine. I was a go-cart racer back then when I was in college and Anne Bazzoli-Kugler with World Karting Magazine talked me into writing a series of stories about a driver named Karl Geary and the two books, Geary’s Year and Geary’s Gold were serialized over the course of about four years in World Karting Magazine. I immediately got to work and started writing an adult style thriller. At the time I was really reading a lot of Robert Ludlum and Ken Follett and David Morrell and so I decided I was going to write a Ludlum-style thriller called, The Valentine Profile because obviously getting published was so incredibly easy that all I had to do was dash it out and send it off and people would pay to publish it. I didn’t see another book in print for almost 20 years [laughs]. So… Debbi: This is not a place to look for overnight success. Richard: Well, most of the overnight successes I know have been doing this for about 20 years [laughs]. Debbi: Exactly! Exactly! Richard: At one level or another. I mean [Robert] Crais was writing for TV for years; Lee Goldberg, too. You know people who’ve been slaving away in the salt mines of writing in the back rooms of the story-runner rooms, and a lot of them are now coming out as novelists and doing a really great job. Debbi: That’s correct. That’s true. I was going to ask you about stock car racing and if you’d ever considered writing a NASCAR novel. Richard: Well, I wrote a novella, which is currently…I have a book of short stories that’s currently with my new book publisher. It’s Clay Stafford Books out of Nashville, Tennessee. But I’ve sent them a short story compilation that includes an unpublis... Debbi Mack interviews mystery author Richard Helms. - To buy any of the books displayed, just click on the cover. - The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. - Or download the PDF copy and read it later. - Debbi: Hi everybody. Debbi Mack interviews mystery author Richard Helms.<br /> <br /> To buy any of the books displayed, just click on the cover.<br /> <br /> The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it.<br /> <br /> Or download the PDF copy and read it later.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi everybody. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I introduce my guest, I’d like to remind you to please check out the Crime Cafe Nine Book Set and the Crime Cafe Short Story Anthology. Both publications you can find on my website, debbimack.com when you click on the link Crime Cafe. You can also find the podcast subscription buttons there, as well as Crime Cafe merch. And with that, I would like to introduce my good friend and a great writer who also happens to be a multi-award winning author, a retired clinical forensic psychologist, and a retired college professor, Richard Helms. Do you go by Rick or Richard?<br /> <br /> Richard: I go by Rick.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Yes, I always call you Rick [laughs]. So, very cool, Rick. Thanks for being here. I’m so glad you could be here.<br /> <br /> Richard: Well, I’m happy to be here. I appreciate you having me today.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Well, it’s my pleasure and at this point, you said you have 19 published novels?<br /> <br /> Richard: Well, yeah. I have 19 that have been published. I think three of them are still in print. So, a bunch of them are available as ebooks, but most of my novels right now are out-of-print for any of a number of reasons. My own publishing company folded up back in 2011 and several of the books were on that, and Five Star (I’m one of the Five Star orphans). Some of you may not be familiar with Five Star. It was a division of Cengage Learning, which used to be Houghton Mifflin. It was Thomson-Shore and all these other, but anyway, they folded their mystery thriller line, I guess January of 2015 and I got the message on my birthday that my book publisher was going out of business.<br /> <br /> Not only that, but my books were going to be going out of print. So, the books that I had with Five Star are largely out-of-print at this point, but I have had 19 published up to this point beginning all the way back in 1980, which is probably before a lot of people watching this were born, when I had my first couple of novels published by World Karting Magazine. I was a go-cart racer back then when I was in college and Anne Bazzoli-Kugler with World Karting Magazine talked me into writing a series of stories about a driver named Karl Geary and the two books, Geary’s Year and Geary’s Gold were serialized over the course of about four years in World Karting Magazine. I immediately got to work and started writing an adult style thriller. At the time I was really reading a lot of Robert Ludlum and Ken Follett and David Morrell and so I decided I was going to write a Ludlum-style thriller called, The Valentine Profile because obviously getting published was so incredibly easy that all I had to do was dash it out and send it off and people would pay to publish it. I didn’t see another book in print for almost 20 years [laughs]. So…<br /> <br /> Debbi: This is not a place to look for overnight success.<br /> <br /> Richard: Well, most of the overnight successes I know have been doing this for about 20 years [laughs].<br /> <br /> Debbi: Exactly! Exactly!<br /> <br /> Richard: At one level or another. I mean [Robert] Crais was writing for TV for years; Lee Goldberg, too. You know people who’ve been slaving away in the salt mines of writing in the back rooms of the story-runner rooms, and a lot of them are now coming out as novelists and doing a really great job.<br /> <br /> Debbi: That’s correct. That’s true. I was going to ask you about stock car racing and if you’d ever considered writing a NASCAR novel.<br /> <br /> Richard: Well, I wrote a novella, Debbi Mack clean 31:48 S. 3, Ep. 17: A Chat with Thriller Author Kristin Helling https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-3-ep-17-a-chat-with-thriller-author-kristin-helling/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-3-ep-17-a-chat-with-thriller-author-kristin-helling Sun, 18 Feb 2018 05:05:42 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=16460 Debbi Mack interviews thriller author Kristin Helling. To buy any of the books displayed, just click on the cover. The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. Or download the PDF copy and read it later. Debbi: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m Debbi Mack, your host. Before I bring on my guest, I’d like to say two things. First, check out my website and the link at debbimack.com. The link “Crime Cafe” where you can find all the buy links for the Crime Cafe publications, as well as the subscribe button for the podcast. Secondly, I’m putting together a Patreon campaign for people who would like to support the podcast. Yes, you can help keep the lights on here and keep the great crime, suspense and thriller talk coming. So, they’ll be great perks for people who get involved and donate as low as a dollar. So, please consider it and be on the lookout for the page. I’ll let everyone know when that’s up. But now, what you’ve been waiting for. My guest is Kristin Helling who “enjoys stories with a journey, whether it’s a journey across the globe, a journey through space, or a journey of finding oneself.” I like that. How’s it going Kristin? It’s great to have you on. Kristin: Good, thank you for having me, Debbi. Debbi: Sure thing. It’s wonderful. So, you’ve done a lot of different types of writing and that intrigues me, but we’ll start with your thriller writing. The Altruism Effect, tell us about the book. What is the book about? Kristin: Yeah, so the premise is based around a psychological experiment from our history, a real one. As I was studying psychology, I got my minor with my bachelor’s in psychology and it was just all of these cases from the past that have taught us so much about humanity, was just so inspiring to me and so I feel like the stories write themselves when I read these cases and so my series, Mastermind Murderers is based off of loose inspirations from psychological studies. So, the first book, The Altruism Effect is based off of the Stanford Prison Experiment that happened in 1971. So, yeah my protagonist is a psychologist herself. She’s graduated with her doctorate and she’s running a clinic with a few other graduates that she has come close with and she’s had a couple of horrific experiences, which relates back to the prison experiment. Kind of helps her guide herself through life. Debbi: I know as a lawyer, it affected me. Kristin: She went through the training to be a psychologist and that definitely came from my background in psychology as well as, you know the cases that I allude to as well. Debbi: Yeah, I thought it was interesting that you had that reference to the Stanford Experiment, because I think I’ve heard of it before and that’s just very scary. And where does The Bystander Effect go from this, the next book I assume in the series? Is it an extension of what happens before? Is it the same protagonist or does something else happen? Kristin: It is, yes. So, this is a four book series. So, I don’t think it’s a spoiler in saying that she survives [laughs]. Debbi: Thank heavens [laughs]. Kristin: And so the second book, The Bystander Effect opens up with the detective that speaks to her when she’s in the hospital at the end. He actually goes back and visits her after there’s been some time for her to heal and he actually approaches her to ask for her expertise in a case that he’s currently working on. So, he…because of the experience that she had, he’s finding similarities in some current cases he’s working on and he thinks with her experience and her education that she would be a really big help to the case. And so, with a lot of kind of going within herself and seeing if this was possible for her to even do, she ends up taking the job, and so the two of them work to try and solve the next case that comes up. That’s kind of how the rest of the series is line... Debbi Mack interviews thriller author Kristin Helling. - To buy any of the books displayed, just click on the cover. - The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. - Or download the PDF copy and read it later. - Debbi: Hi, Debbi Mack interviews thriller author Kristin Helling.<br /> <br /> To buy any of the books displayed, just click on the cover.<br /> <br /> The interview transcript is below, if you’d like to read it.<br /> <br /> Or download the PDF copy and read it later.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hi, everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. Your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m Debbi Mack, your host. Before I bring on my guest, I’d like to say two things. First, check out my website and the link at debbimack.com. The link “Crime Cafe” where you can find all the buy links for the Crime Cafe publications, as well as the subscribe button for the podcast. Secondly, I’m putting together a Patreon campaign for people who would like to support the podcast. Yes, you can help keep the lights on here and keep the great crime, suspense and thriller talk coming. So, they’ll be great perks for people who get involved and donate as low as a dollar. So, please consider it and be on the lookout for the page. I’ll let everyone know when that’s up. But now, what you’ve been waiting for. My guest is Kristin Helling who “enjoys stories with a journey, whether it’s a journey across the globe, a journey through space, or a journey of finding oneself.” I like that. How’s it going Kristin? It’s great to have you on.<br /> <br /> Kristin: Good, thank you for having me, Debbi.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Sure thing. It’s wonderful. So, you’ve done a lot of different types of writing and that intrigues me, but we’ll start with your thriller writing. The Altruism Effect, tell us about the book. What is the book about?<br /> <br /> Kristin: Yeah, so the premise is based around a psychological experiment from our history, a real one. As I was studying psychology, I got my minor with my bachelor’s in psychology and it was just all of these cases from the past that have taught us so much about humanity, was just so inspiring to me and so I feel like the stories write themselves when I read these cases and so my series, Mastermind Murderers is based off of loose inspirations from psychological studies. So, the first book, The Altruism Effect is based off of the Stanford Prison Experiment that happened in 1971. So, yeah my protagonist is a psychologist herself. She’s graduated with her doctorate and she’s running a clinic with a few other graduates that she has come close with and she’s had a couple of horrific experiences, which relates back to the prison experiment. Kind of helps her guide herself through life.<br /> <br /> Debbi: I know as a lawyer, it affected me.<br /> <br /> Kristin: She went through the training to be a psychologist and that definitely came from my background in psychology as well as, you know the cases that I allude to as well.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Yeah, I thought it was interesting that you had that reference to the Stanford Experiment, because I think I’ve heard of it before and that’s just very scary. And where does The Bystander Effect go from this, the next book I assume in the series? Is it an extension of what happens before? Is it the same protagonist or does something else happen?<br /> <br /> Kristin: It is, yes. So, this is a four book series. So, I don’t think it’s a spoiler in saying that she survives [laughs].<br /> <br /> Debbi: Thank heavens [laughs].<br /> <br /> Kristin: And so the second book, The Bystander Effect opens up with the detective that speaks to her when she’s in the hospital at the end. He actually goes back and visits her after there’s been some time for her to heal and he actually approaches her to ask for her expertise in a case that he’s currently working on. So, he…because of the experience that she had, he’s finding similarities in some current cases he’s working on and he thinks with her experience and her education that she would be a really big help to the case. And so, with a lot of kind of going within herself and seeing if this was ... Debbi Mack clean 16:20 S. 3, Ep. 16: A Chat with Mystery Author S.G. Wong https://www.debbimack.com/blog/podcast-episodes/s-3-ep-16-a-chat-with-mystery-author-s-g-wong/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=s-3-ep-16-a-chat-with-mystery-author-s-g-wong Sun, 04 Feb 2018 05:05:32 +0000 http://www.debbimack.com/?p=16402 Debbi Mack interviews mystery author S.G. Wong. The transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. Or download the PDF copy and read it later. Debbi: Hello everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. This is your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I introduce my guest, I would just like to remind you to check out the Crime Cafe link on my website, debbimack.com where you can find buy links for the Crime Cafe Boxed Set and Short Story Anthology. It’s only $1.99 for the boxed set and $0.99 for the anthology and you can also subscribe to the podcast there. And now, it’s a great pleasure for me to introduce my next guest, a woman who writes in the hardboiled mystery genre, which I love and also has an awesome female protagonist, S. G. Wong. Hi, S.G., how are you doing today? S.G.: I’m doing well Debbi. How are you? Debbi: Fine, thanks! I had the pleasure of reading your first Lola Starke novel Die On Your Feet. I just thought it was so, such an interesting concept. S.G.: Thank you. Debbi: How about you tell us about Lola and her companion, so to speak, Aubrey [laughs]. S.G.: So, as you mentioned my series protagonist, her name is Lola Starke, and Lola lives in a city, I call Crescent City. I created a world for her and it’s based on 1930’s Los Angeles, but the premise is “what if the Chinese had colonized rather than Europeans” and then I also imagined ghosts being a regular part of life in Crescent City. So, Lola’s constant companion, Aubrey is invisible to Lola but she hears him. She hears him just fine. Oftentimes, she’s not happy about hearing what he has to say, but you know those are the best sorts of, you know partnerships. Dramatic partnerships are, you know, when they’re at odds. It’s really fun to write. So, Lola is a bit of a trust fund baby, but she’s actually also a private investigator. She chose that path because of her father who worked at one of the studios in town. So, since it’s based on, you know, not a very close reading of 1930’s era L.A., but sort of this Hollywood glamorized version that we all sort of have (those of us who don’t actually live there). So, there’s a movie studio, there’s a movie studio system and so Lola’s father used to work as a fixer for the studios and she’s kind of gotten into that sort of problem solving career. So, that’s who she is and her companion, Aubrey. Yeah, her ghost [laughs]. Debbi: That’s really something. The first book ends in a way that’s not really a cliffhanger, but really strongly suggests an interesting sequel. That’s all I’ll say about that. S.G.: I’ve actually…well so far, I mean now it’s 2018 isn’t it? There are three books out in this series so far, and I’m actually busily working on a prequel novella. It’s actually a re-working. I actually had finished it back in July of 2017 and then you know how it is, Debbi when you’ve done something and it’s okay, but something’s not quite sitting right with you, you know as the writer. And so I sat with that for months, and I finally decided in December I had to re-write the whole thing because it just was not quite working. So, I have no idea when that’s going to be out [laughs], but I’m working on it. And then, in terms of the continuing novel series, I have an idea to do three more books. Books Four, Five and Six I guess it would be. Sort of like a trilogy within the larger series because I have a really long story arc I want to explore. So, that’s what’s on deck I guess, as they say. Debbi: Wow, that’s fascinating. I realized that you had some books after the first one and I was curious about what kind of story arc Lola had without giving too much away over the course of those books. S.G.: Right. So far books One, Two and Three and thank you very much again for your lovely, kind words about book One, Die On Your Feet. So, the two books after that, the second one is called, In For A Pound and the third one is called, Debbi Mack interviews mystery author S.G. Wong. - The transcript is below, if you’d like to read it. - Or download the PDF copy and read it later. - Debbi: Hello everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. This is your podcasting source of great crime, Debbi Mack interviews mystery author S.G. Wong.<br /> <br /> The transcript is below, if you’d like to read it.<br /> <br /> Or download the PDF copy and read it later.<br /> <br /> Debbi: Hello everyone. This is the Crime Cafe. This is your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I’m your host, Debbi Mack. Before I introduce my guest, I would just like to remind you to check out the Crime Cafe link on my website, debbimack.com where you can find buy links for the Crime Cafe Boxed Set and Short Story Anthology. It’s only $1.99 for the boxed set and $0.99 for the anthology and you can also subscribe to the podcast there. And now, it’s a great pleasure for me to introduce my next guest, a woman who writes in the hardboiled mystery genre, which I love and also has an awesome female protagonist, S. G. Wong. Hi, S.G., how are you doing today?<br /> <br /> S.G.: I’m doing well Debbi. How are you?<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Debbi: Fine, thanks! I had the pleasure of reading your first Lola Starke novel Die On Your Feet. I just thought it was so, such an interesting concept.<br /> <br /> S.G.: Thank you.<br /> <br /> Debbi: How about you tell us about Lola and her companion, so to speak, Aubrey [laughs].<br /> <br /> S.G.: So, as you mentioned my series protagonist, her name is Lola Starke, and Lola lives in a city, I call Crescent City. I created a world for her and it’s based on 1930’s Los Angeles, but the premise is “what if the Chinese had colonized rather than Europeans” and then I also imagined ghosts being a regular part of life in Crescent City. So, Lola’s constant companion, Aubrey is invisible to Lola but she hears him. She hears him just fine. Oftentimes, she’s not happy about hearing what he has to say, but you know those are the best sorts of, you know partnerships. Dramatic partnerships are, you know, when they’re at odds. It’s really fun to write. So, Lola is a bit of a trust fund baby, but she’s actually also a private investigator. She chose that path because of her father who worked at one of the studios in town. So, sinc